Unveiled: Neither Veil nor Submission


fitnah-UNVEILED-nov13_Page_01Fitnah’s November issue of Unveiled (Volume 1, Issue 2) has now been published and can be found here: fitnah-UNVEILED-nov13.

editor: Maryam Namazie
design by: Kiran Opal

Content includes:

The veil is nothing but the flag of the Muslim far-right, An interview with Algerian sociologist Marieme Helie Lucas. In this must-read interview, Marieme Helie Lucas says:

“If we do agree that this sudden rise of specific veils worldwide passing off as THE ‘Islamic’ veil is neither cultural nor religious but a political flag that fundamentalists use in order to increase their political visibility at the expense of women, then we must also admit that wearing this form of veil – now – in Europe and North America has a political purpose; the women who wear it, whether they are aware of it or not, are wearing the flag of a far-right political party. Hence I could hardly agree with the formulation: ‘a woman choosing how to dress.’ This veil is definitely not to be equated to wearing high heels versus flat shoes, or miniskirts versus trousers. It is not a fashion; it is a political marker. If one decides one is going to wear a swastika as a brooch, one cannot ignore its political meaning; one cannot pretend one does not care for the fact that it was the ’flag’ of Nazi Germany. One cannot pretend one just likes its shape. It is a political statement.”

Neither Veil nor Submission, Editorial by Maryam Namazie on the niqab ban. In it, she writes:

“The niqab and burqa in particular are the visible signs of Islamism’s war on women and the society at large. It also represents sex apartheid and Sharia law and all that follows. In Madani School, burqa-wearing girls must sit in the back of the classroom. On school trips, they must give way to boys and male teachers who cut in front of them in queues. Music is banned… The call for a ban has nothing to do with a clash of civilisations. It has everything to do with a global struggle between secularists, including many Muslims, on the one hand and theocrats and the religious-Right on the other.”

Newsflash provides updates on women’s rights and issues in a number of countries worldwide.

In the Art Corner, one can find information on an Afghan rap singer and censored packaging in Iran.

Recent highlighted campaigns, include End Stoning Now and End Legalised Paedophilia in Iran

Full issue can be found here: fitnah-UNVEILED-nov13.

Comments

  1. says

    FITNA unveiled?
    I think you don’t know how to spread FITNAH and get succeeded…your ignorant group acts like an immature adolescence in spreading FITNAH among ignorant intellectuals (idiots/stupids)….

    I agree you are inspired by ayan hirsi ali, that left Islam after knowing Islamic teachings (????!!!!) was the reason for 9/11 attack on WTC and keeping that in mind wrote the first book called FITNA.

    You need a thorough training with superior technological strategies to destroy Muslim nations/belief (Iraq, Afghanistan) and to kill millions of innocent children, women and people…

    Don’t you like to know how to spread fitna, fasaad among ignorant people?…watch the following video :

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZMEHc14IWf4

    one more : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ezIU6ZxYU3A

  2. Dave Day says

    This is, so far as I have experienced, the most eloquent explanation of what is and is not true about the way some Muslim women dress, and why it is so important to all of us… the whole world, as we are surely all touched by the hand of fundamentalist, extremist Islam. (By Islam, I differentiate from moderate, secular Muslims.)

    Many thanks for such a succinct and illuminating piece of writing!

    Dave.

  3. Janet says

    Thanks for the link to the fascinating interview with Marieme Helie Lucas.

    My memories of feminism in the 1970s differ from hers in an important respect, though. As an activist throughout the 1970s i never knew any feminist who defended female genital mutilation (FGM) as a “cultural right”.

    We battled to get FGM called by its correct name, for a start! It was routinely called “female circumcision” until feminists refused to let it hide under such a euphemism any more.

    We also struggled to get it accepted as an issue that white activists had a right to campaign on. Men on the left tried to ignore uncomfortable issues such as FGM, or avoid discussion by saying that our opposition to FGM was “cultural imperialism”.

    But I agree with Marieme that many women today seem to have lost their certainty about such important issues. Is it the paralysing force of cultural relativism, which stops people saying that anything is totally unacceptable? Or are they more frightened of being called “racist” than furious about oppression of women?

    • says

      I came across many of those feminists in the 80s, telling me not to call it FGM and to call it circumcision and respect culture… Of course that is not to say that all feminists thought that way but a large segment did – in the same way that they call for the respect of the veil and burqa and niqab today.

  4. logicthoughts says

    you are a funny woman….there is no FGM in saudi arabia where islamic tradition followed strictly…FMG is more cultural than religious act….your formula of FMG = veil burqa and nikab itself shows your lack of intelligency and how ignorant you are…

    VERY FUNNY WOMAN.

      • logicthoughts says

        Thank you for calling me an idiot…, I am still laughing at your comparison between genital mutilation is equal to burqa, veil and hijab and calling me an idiot as well..… one of the greatest jokes of 21st century…it shows your standard of FREETHOUGHTS and lack of common sense. Now everybody knows who is an idiot….

        Reminder : I think you know, why communist / an atheist Mr. Stalin had banned thoughts of his critics of his “freethoughts” before killing millions of Russian innocents.

  5. Dave Day says

    Whilst FGM may not be practiced widely in Saudi Arabia, even so, it is very much a practice associated with areas of the world where Islam is the majority religion. It is not a practice associated with Christians, Jews, Sikhs, Buddhists, Hindus, etc. It may be cultural, but if it is not called for by the Islamic tradition, then surely it must come from some non-Islamic tradition, in which case I am surprised that Muslim leaders and teachers have not spoken out against it. If it is not Islamic in tradition, then it would seem logical to conclude that it comes from some pre-Islamic religion, and is therefore Haram, surely?

    Could it be that Moslem leaders know that if they called for an end to FGM people would leave the faith? Could the culture be stronger than Islam? It seems that Moslems may ‘turn a blind eye’ when it suits their purpose, but then, didn’t Mohammad say that it was acceptable to lie to infidels when it suits the purposes of Moslems?

    I think FGM shows Islam to be the barbaric Stone/Bronze/Iron Age religion that it is, and Islamists don’t like it when the facts are pointed out in public. I do admit though that you are more likely to argue in favour of FGM than to accept that your whole belief system may be flawed! It would probably mean turning against your friends, family, culture, and what gives you emotional security. So, it’s just not going to happen. Of course, if you turned your back on Islam I’m also not sure how your friends and family might react. If Moslems, then maybe not in the nicest of ways?!

    For my part, I am willing to accept that you will not be swayed in your views by my, or any other person’s argument… at least not yet. However, it is more likely that you will change your views than it is that I will change mine! :0)

    • logicthoughts says

      I respect your opinion but don’t agree with your argument.

      In short ,Your argument and question have answer in itself. You said:……… “It may be cultural, but if it is not called for by the Islamic tradition, “then surely it must come from some non-Islamic tradition “……..

  6. Dave Day says

    I think when anyone says that they respect a person’s opinion but don’t agree, but don’t offer any counter-argument, it looks very much like they don’t have an answer that they have any confidence in. It would seem that such a person would be taking a differing viewpoint ‘on faith’, i.e. believing something with little or no evidence!

    If the tradition of FGM is non-Islamic, then it must come from some pre-Islamic religion. So, my question still stands. If it is non-Islamic, why has it not been denounced by leaders of Moslem communities, Imams, etc.? Surely if it’s not to be denounced for being barbaric, then for being a tradition that has carried on from a pre-Islamic religion? Or does Islam allow the continuation of previous religious traditions after one has converted to Islam? From what I know of Islam, it would be unlikely for any Moslem to admit to this, but it seems that Mohamed himself made certain ‘accommodations’ so that certain tribes would follow him and join his cause (sorry, follow Allah and follow Allah’s instructions through his prophet.)

    You quoted my previous argument, at least in part, and I have tried to clarify my argument, but I would like to know why you think my argument is flawed, if indeed you do? Or, do you just have no logical answer for my questions? Do you just disagree with me… but don’t really have a logical reason why? Is this just a matter of faith for you?

  7. logicthoughts says

    MR .Dev Day, peace be upon you,
    Your repeated question:……If the tradition of FGM is non-Islamic, then it must come from some pre-Islamic religion. So, my question still stands. If it is non-Islamic, why has it not been denounced by leaders of Moslem communities,

    My answer: most of the Muslim leaders denounced FGM and abandoned this act entirely in SAUDI ARABIA…the leaders who still want to continue this tradition may not agree with that. ..some Muslims In India ,Pakistan and few other Muslim nations still follow un Islamic traditions such as praying to dead man, believing in fake baba’s(saints) which is still common in Hindu culture. Those who converted from Hinduism to Islam still continue with this act…that doesn’t mean Islamic leaders support these traditions or beliefs.

  8. logicthoughts says

    *…… Those who converted from Hinduism to Islam still continue with this act…that doesn’t mean Islamic leaders support these traditions or beliefs.

    Correction : SOME of Those who converted from Hinduism to Islam still continue with this act…that doesn’t mean Islamic leaders support these traditions or beliefs.

  9. Val Nuttall says

    Logicthoughts (now that is funny),

    So many of your words are amusing in this blog but we must give special attention to the following……

    “.I think you don’t know how to spread FITNAH and get succeeded…your ignorant group acts like an immature adolescence in spreading FITNAH among ignorant intellectuals (idiots/stupids)…. ..

    and

    “there is no FGM in saudi arabia where islamic tradition followed strictly…FMG is more cultural than religious act….your formula of FMG = veil burqa and nikab itself shows your lack of intelligency and how ignorant you are…”

    We really enjoyed it, it produced much laughter in the houshold, keep trying won’t you! Wankers are often the funniest people

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