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Nov 30 2012

Matt Barber fails simple irony test

Don’t forget, the Gamers For Godlessness 24 Hour Gameathon fundraiser for Camp Quest and Women In Secularism starts tomorrow at 12 Noon EST! This link will take you there, though the link will only be live tomorrow at 10am EST.

Considering the So-Called War On Christmas is a trumped-up and nonexistent thing, and how Christians get all up in arms any time they’re told “no, they can’t impose their version of Christmas on others”, and how any instance of “Happy Holidays” is somehow offensive to them… yeah. Matt Barber apparently thinks the problem is people being too easily offended. But he doesn’t get that practically nobody on the “let’s keep government secular” side of the equation is actually offended by Christmas, or nativity scenes, or you celebrating in Christ’s name. We just don’t want you doing it on public or government grounds.

Have your nativity scenes on your church lawns, or your front yards (if one nativity scene every three blocks is insufficient density for your tastes — seriously, how many churches do you really need?). I don’t give a shit, frankly, as long as your religious displays and your creches are on your own property, not on the government’s or public land.

And please stop being so easily offended by people pointing out that there are people of other faiths who don’t need yours rammed down their throats, because you should know it works both ways. This is yet another instance of a majority, in a position of privilege by virtue of having most of the political and social clout, who thinks any attempt to limit their free hand to subjugate the minorities is actually a form of suppression — he actually uses the phrase “tyranny of the minority” to describe telling the majority to take their foot off the minority’s throat. It’s bloody laughable! It’s no more an abrogation of your rights than telling bullies to stop stealing other kids’ lunch money is an abrogation of the bullies’ rights.

News flash: you do not have the right to impose your religion on others. The laws you attempt to break by putting your religious displays on public and government land also protect you from having to suffer through some other religion’s imposition of their observances should they ever gain political sway — and you breaking those laws is definitely not a right.

1 comment

  1. 1
    Loqi

    News flash: you do not have the right to impose your religion on others.

    But don’t you see that’s oppressing Christians? That’s one of the faith’s major goals!

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