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Jun 25 2009

Reading is FUN-damental

I need to get back into reading something other than the e-interweb tubes, so I just bought a bunch of books via Amazon.  To wit:

  • “Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch”
    Neil Gaiman; Mass Market Paperback; CDN$ 8.75
  • “Webmage”
    Kelly Mccullough; Paperback; CDN$ 9.99
  • “Cybermancy”
    Kelly Mccullough; Paperback; CDN$ 9.99
  • “Codespell”
    Kelly Mccullough; Paperback; CDN$ 7.50
  • “Mythos”
    Kelly Mccullough; Paperback; CDN$ 9.99
  • “Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: The Classic Regency Romance – Now with Ultraviolent Zombie Mayhem!”
    Jane Austen; Paperback; CDN$ 8.98
  • “The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark”
    Carl Sagan; Hardcover; CDN$ 7.70 (used)
  • “Atlas Shrugged”
    Ayn Rand; Paperback; CDN$ 19.53

Guess which one I’m joking about buying. Here’s a hint — it’s fucking Ayn Rand, okay? And yeah, the price isn’t a joke. Even now, her emitic of a book costs twice as much as any other on my reading list. I honestly wish she’d “gone Galt” before she decided to write this execrable piece of self-lauding trash.*

4-7 days apparently, for the bulk of these books. Should be around the same time as we start getting some fucking idea when our bedroom set is going to arrive. Which is fun. Should also hopefully arrive sometime near when those damned Galileoscopes finally wend their way to our neck of the woods as well. Not that I’m complaining about the Galileoscopes — those at least have a good reason for the delay, and are for a good cause ultimately. The furniture, on the other hand, already has me a grand poorer and in debt of slightly over another grand to Wells Fargo (of all goddamn companies!!), and I haven’t seen hide nor hair of the damnable things.


*If you actually plan on reading this horrid little example of literary backwash, here’s the tl;dr: people, when you treat them nicely, will invariably become total shitheels and slack off leaving you to do all the work, so let’s all grind society to a halt by going on strike until the shitheels start doing their part to maintain society to our high standards too. Also, hooray for capitalism and boo to anything even remotely associated with the political left, or even slightly left of capitalist fatcat millionaire douchebag.

8 comments

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  1. 1
    Dan J

    “Good Omens” is a classic! I can’t say that I’ve read any of Kelly Mccullough’s work though. I recently started re-reading Neal Stephenson’s “Baroque Cycle”. I’ve never really been one to read historical fiction, but Stephenson’s stuff is incredible.

  2. 2
    Jason Thibeault

    Cryptonomicon is another of those books that have long been on my reading list; one of these days I’ll get around to giving it a chance. Snow Crash too, which I believe is actually sitting on my bookshelf waiting for me to get around to it.

    I’ve been out of the reading world for far too long.

  3. 3
    Anonymous

    I haven’t read “Snow Crash”, but it’s on my long list of “want to read”. You must definitely read “Cryptonomicon”. Being an IT geek, you will love it, especially if you have any interest in cryptography. It really is an amazing book. Of course, the main characters in “Cryptonomicon” are the descendants of the main characters in “The Baroque Cycle” (except for one of the characters who is in both of them).

    I usually keep a paperback with me for the times when I really have nothing to do for ten or twenty minutes. If I didn’t read, I would probably be even more nuts than usual.

  4. 4
    Dan J

    I haven’t read “Snow Crash”, but it’s on my long list of “want to read”. You must definitely read “Cryptonomicon”. Being an IT geek, you will love it, especially if you have any interest in cryptography. It really is an amazing book. Of course, the main characters in “Cryptonomicon” are the descendants of the main characters in “The Baroque Cycle” (except for one of the characters who is in both of them).

    I usually keep a paperback with me for the times when I really have nothing to do for ten or twenty minutes. If I didn’t read, I would probably be even more nuts than usual.

  5. 5
    Stephanie Z

    I do love Good Omens. It’s everything that’s right about British humor in one place. I hope you enjoy Kelly’s books (and love that the prices tell me something about the history of exchange rates).

  6. 6
    Jason Thibeault

    I hope so too, but judging from the snippet you posted, I don’t doubt that I will. It seems like my childhood fascination with mythology wrapped up in my adult fascination with computers, so it’s right up my alley.

    I’d already read half, give or take, of Good Omens in PDF format, and I know it’s good. I don’t know why I had lost interest in it (probably just got distracted by something else going on in my life), and since it’s in PDF format, doesn’t really re-intrude into my life the same way a book with a bookmark in it.

    I know, I’m evil for downloading it, but I’m very much of the camp where you buy once you decide something’s worth it.

  7. 7
    Jason Thibeault

    Good Omens is definitely worth it, I don’t know why you stopped reading it either. Every time I read it it just gets better. Crowley is my hero.

  8. 8
    Dan J

    I may have to re-read “Good Omens” again soon. Another of Neil Gaiman’s that I really enjoy is “American Gods”. I re-read it last year, and enjoyed it immensely, all over again. I understand there’s a different edition available in the UK that’s 12000 words longer than the original edition.

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