CPS erasure of male victims…. VICTORY!

Well this was, in all honesty, unexpected. 

I fully accept the concerns raised by some, however, that we need to be clearer in our annual VaWG report about the inclusion of men and boys, which is why I have arranged for amendments to be made to the current, and all future, reports. We will clarify our introductory remarks and we will also, where possible, include a breakdown of gender volumes.

When we first set about getting together our open letter, my most optimistic hope was that the CPS would notice it had happened, grudgingly admit we might have a point, and make some token effort to be less blatant in showing contempt for male victims next time .  But it was really just a plaintive cry.

Never in my wildest dreams did I imagine the CPS might admit they got it wrong, go back amend the current report and so publicly commit to not doing the same again in future.

As I’m sure you’ll notice, the piece by Saunders is brimful of self-justification and waffle, as well as a lot of words that address complaints which were never actually made in the first place, but right in the middle is everything we asked for and considerably more. Honestly I don’t care.

This is something I don’t often get to write as a campaigner, activist or journalist, so I am going to revel in the moment….

WE WON!

WE ACTUALLY BLOODY WON!

Feminist indoctrination in schools? The Telegraph’s tankful of bullshit.

Yesterday it seemed like everyone and their dog was pointing me towards the article in the Telegraph by Dan Bell of Inside Man magazine. “We must stop indoctrinating boys in feminist ideology” screamed the headline, followed by the standfirst: “Feminist organisations, backed by government policy, are teaching young boys at school to feel guilty and ashamed of their gender.”

I should be clear from the off the Dan is a mate of mine, I am generally a supporter or (and occasional contributor) to Inside Man, and the argument that is about to follow is one that Dan and I have had (literally) over a pint in the pub before, and may well do again. On that basis I am sure he won’t mind if I take it public, and explain why I believe on this issue he is not just wrong, but irresponsibly, damagingly wrong. [Read more…]

The letters continue: Erasure, misrepresentation and Orwellian doublespeak

To the signatories of the letter Gender is all too relevant in violence statistics.

First let me thank you for the opportunity to continue this important conversation. It is clear your letter in the Guardian today is a reaction to the one signed by myself and 30 others last week, however it would be wrong to call it a response, as you do not appear to have addressed or even understood any of the issues our letter raised, preferring to criticise us on a variety of points which our letter simply did not make.

Allow me to be more specific.

Your correspondents call on the director of public prosecutions to “affirm [her] commitment to eliminating intimate violence against human beings of any gender” and criticise the Crown Prosecution Service’s presentation of statistics in its annual violence against women and girls report for being so explicitly gendered (Letters, 2 July).

We did not criticise the CPS report for being so explicitly gendered. We would expect a report entitled “Violence Against Women and Girls, crime report” to be explicitly gendered. Nor did we condemn the CPS for producing a report with that subject and title.

We criticised the CPS report for being dishonest and misleading in including crimes against at least 13,154 (known) boys and men in a report entitled ‘Violence Against Women and Girls’ while going to some lengths to entirely obscure the experiences of male victims.

It is established fact that these crimes are massively disproportionately committed against women and girls (female genital mutilation exclusively so) and that they are related to women’s broader inequality with men. Your correspondents claim without citation that “one in six of all victims” are male. This is disputed, and certainly does not apply equally to all the forms of abuse in the CPS report.

The figure of 1 in 6 did not require citation as it comes from the CPS report itself and the accompanying data tables. Where gender was recorded, 16% of victims of the crimes described in the report were men and boys. This is most certainly not disputed, the statistics are in Table 8 of the performance information here.

Furthermore, it is also critical that we retain gender in our naming and analysis of these crimes because of the gender of the perpetrators, whom your correspondents do not mention at all.

We did not mention it because we had no dispute with how the CPS report covered the gender of the perpetrators. The report explained quite clearly that around 94% of offenders of these crimes within the criminal justice system were male and 6% female. We accept this, and had no reason to raise it in our letter.

In searching for recognition and then for justice and support for male survivors of abuse, it is a grave mistake to suggest taking gender out of the naming and analysis, and neutralising these crimes into Orwellian “intimate abuse”. A failure to name and call out the abuse of power in these crimes is what kept them invisible for so long.

At no point in our letter did we suggest taking gender out of the analysis. On the contrary, we clearly expressed that male victims have their own gender-specific issues, such as those relating to social expectations of a ‘real man.’ Nor are gender issues neutralised by the phrase ‘intimate abuse’ or ‘intimate violence’ – this term has always been used by many public bodies including the Office of National Statistics, to describe crimes such as domestic violence and abuse – for example, see here, the chapter “Intimate Personal Violence and Serious Sexual Assault.”

You describe this phrase as “Orwellian.” I would suggest what is truly Orwellian is for the experiences of many thousands of violated men and boys to be described with the phrase ‘violence against women and girls.’ War is peace; freedom is slavery; boys are girls. What is truly Orwellian is for the CPS to highlight the conviction of Fr Francis Paul Cullen as an example of their success in prosecuting crimes against women and girls, when the large majority of his victims were boys, and for the gender of those victims to be entirely “taken out of the analysis” by descriptions of his victims only in gender-neutral terms as “young people.”

I would add that it is this type of erasure of male victims – even when the statistics and facts are right before our eyes – which has done so much to keep those crimes invisible for so long, a tragedy which your letter appears to strive to continue.

I do not speak today on behalf of the other signatories to our letter, only for myself, but I for one do not believe in taking gender out of the analysis of sexual and intimate offences. I believe gender issues are crucial to understanding why so many such crimes occur, and what kind of support is needed by victims. What I cannot accept is a cruel and misleading approach which focusses entirely on the gender of victims when they are women and girls and entirely ignores and erases gender when the victims are men and boys, or worse, when the experiences of those men and boys are subsumed into descriptions of violence against women and girls.

I finish on a note of genuine sadness. In our own letter we were very careful to honestly declare our full commitment to supporting all efforts to end violence against women and girls. Many of the signatories to our letter work with female survivors alongside men and boys, and are only too aware of the issues. But even though your response begins by noting our call for the CPS and other bodies to affirm their commitment to recognising and supporting male victims of intimate violence and abuse, in your response you could not even bring yourselves to offer a single equivalent word of support or compassion for the countless thousands of men and boys who are raped, abused, beaten and molested every year. I would add that, despite contacting them directly, we have as yet had no contact from the CPS or any other body that so much as acknowledges the existence of male victims, far less affirming support for their needs.

The male victims I know and support, and those engaged professionally by many of my co-signatories, often report feeling worthless and ignored, as if no one cares about what happened to them in the past or what will happen to them now and in the future. How tragic that your letter may well serve to confirm their darkest suspicions.

The Guardian publishes our open letter to CPS

After I published my blog post last week, several friends and colleagues from organisations involved in men’s health and recovery got in touch to share their astonishment and anger at what I had revealed. The brazen falsehood in the presentation of the ‘Violence against Women and Girls’ data was shocking enough, but possibly worse was the failure of any mainstream media or journalists to pick up on what had happened and challenge the CPS over their work.

We decided to take matters into our own hands. By Monday we had got together a draft letter, nominally to the Guardian’s letters page but really to Alison Saunders and the CPS, The response was phenomenal. We ended up with around 30 of Britain’s leading experts in the fields agreeing to put their names to the letter and this morning, I am very proud to say, the letter appears in the Guardian . We have also sent a press release to all national news desks, so hopefully further media will follow. [Read more…]

Why is the CPS erasing the experience of thousands of abuse victims?

The report by the Crown Prosecution Service, published yesterday, has an unequivocal title: “Violence Against Women and Girls, crime report 2014-15.”

One might reasonably presume from this that the report details statistics for crimes of violence committed against women and girls. Indeed, that presumption appears to have been made by pretty much every journalist who covered the story. The Independent, for example, reported that “107,104 people were prosecuted for violence against women in 2014-15.”

This is quite simply not true. In the very first paragraph of the executive summary, the authors explain that the report is ‘an analysis of the key prosecution issues in each Violence against Women and Girls (VAWG) strand – domestic abuse, rape, sexual offences, stalking, harassment, forced marriage, honour based violence, female genital mutilation, child abuse, human trafficking, prostitution and pornography.’ [Read more…]

How I learned how to love

There was to be no arguing. The bathroom was to be redecorated, and redecorated fast. There was some shiny black and silver patterned wallpaper that had gone up just a couple of years earlier, but it had been a mistake, and it had to go. It was at the top of a short but important list of jobs, from tending some newly planted grass seeds to buying a new peanut dispenser for the bird table in the garden, but none of them rivalled the bathroom walls for urgency. Neither I nor any family member could be trusted with that vital task, so the painters and decorators came in on the Tuesday and that very night something inside him went pop and the haemorrhaging began. [Read more…]

More thoughts on male objectification, body sculpting and those adverts

Since this topic has been keeping you all interested this week, thought I’d point you towards a piece that’s just gone up at IB Times. I guess it captures some of my thoughts about the debate that has been going on, as well as spelling out where I stand on broader issues of our cultural obsession (?) with the male body beautiful.

Full piece is here, with a taster below. There’s no commenting at IB Times so if you want to call me rude names I’m happy to accommodate here.

—- [Read more…]

Wolf-whistling and over-reactions

Irony is a hard concept to define but easy to recognise. The other day a woman contacted a police station in Worcester to report that she had been repeatedly and persistently sexually harassed by construction workers on a site in Worcester. Police heard her complaint, went and had a word with the company concerned and decided no further action was necessary.

This morning this story is splashed on the front page of the Daily Mail, and is reported at length in the Express, the Telegraph, the Mirror, the Metro and several international news sites, and as I write, it is being discussed on the phone-in show on the BBC’s talk station, 5Live. All these media outlets want to know the same thing… who has over-reacted? Was it the police? Should they have simply told her to piss off and stop wasting their time? Or was it the woman who made the complaint? Should she have grown a thicker skin or accepted the harassment as a compliment.

The answer, my dear friends and colleagues in the media, is that the only people who have over-reacted are YOU, you pustulating cluster of pillow-brained wazzocks, YOU have over-reacted, no one else. Irony. [Read more…]

Protein World and the pollution of the commons

Unless you have been living under a rock these past few days (or haven’t logged on to Twitter, which amounts to much the same) you have probably caught passing breezes from an almighty flap about the London Underground billboard advertising campaign for Protein World.

Featuring the improbably slender physique of Australian model Renee Somerfield next to the slogan “ARE YOU BEACH BODY READY?” these posters inspired an online petition demanding their removal and an associated social media tempest. Things really got lively, however, when the company declined to follow the usual corporate PR social media strategy (issue a half-arsed apology for “any offence caused” then batten down the hatches) and instead standing their ground and launching gleefully into a full-blown flame-war with their critics – apparently handled personally by their CEO and marketing director. [Read more…]