“Buy this book and share it as widely as possible”: Amazon Customer Review of “Why Are You Atheists So Angry?”

I’ve gotten some nice Amazon customer reviews for Why Are You Atheists So Angry? 99 Things That Piss Off the Godless, and I thought I’d repost some of them. Here’s a good one, five stars out of five. (As of this writing, the book has 148 customer reviews, and 120 are either 5-star or 4-star.) Here’s what Barry Taylor had to say:

Should be required reading for all

Anyone who reads Greta Christina’s blog will be familiar with her accessible and insightful writing style, and this book offers more of the same but with a specific focus. Yes, we atheists are angry, and we have good reasons to be. Buy this book and share it as widely as possible.

Thanks, Barry! And if any of you have read Why Are You Atheists So Angry?, it’d be awesome if you’d post a review.

***

Here, by the way, is ordering info for the book in all three formats — print, ebook, and audiobook!

Why Are You Atheists So AngryEbook editions:
The Kindle edition is available at Amazon.
The Nook edition is available at Barnes & Noble.
Smashwords has the book in multiple formats, including iBooks, Sony Reader, Kobo, Kindle (.mobi), Stanza, Aldiko, Adobe Digital Editions, any other reader that takes the Epub format, Palm Doc (PDB), PDF, RTF, Online Reading via HTML, and Plain Text for either downloading or viewing.
All ebook editions and formats cost just $7.99.

Print edition:
The print edition is available at Powell’s Books.
The print edition is also available at Amazon. However, be advised (if you haven’t been already) that seriously abusive labor practices have been reported at Amazon warehouses. Please bear that in mind when you’re deciding where to buy my book — or indeed, where to buy anything. (For the record: Powell’s employees are unionized.) Again, that’s the link for Amazon US — it’s available in other regions as well.
The print edition is available at Last Gasp.
The print edition is $14.95 USD. It is published by Pitchstone Publishing.

Wholesale sales of the print edition:
Bookstores and other retailers can get the book from Ingram, Baker & Taylor, and other standard wholesale distributors. It can also be purchased directly from the publisher, Pitchstone Publishing.

Audiobook edition:
The audiobook version is available at Audible.
The audiobook version is available on iTunes.
The audiobook version is available on Amazon.
And yes, I did the recording for it!


Comforting Thoughts book cover oblong 100 JPGComing Out Atheist Bendingwhy are you atheists so angryGreta Christina is author of four books: Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God, Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why, Why Are You Atheists So Angry? 99 Things That Piss Off the Godless, and Bending: Dirty Kinky Stories About Pain, Power, Religion, Unicorns, & More.

“Witty, and to the point!” Amazon Customer Review of “Why Are You Atheists So Angry?”

I’ve gotten some nice Amazon customer reviews for Why Are You Atheists So Angry? 99 Things That Piss Off the Godless, and I thought I’d repost some of them. Here’s a good one, five stars out of five. (As of this writing, the book has 148 customer reviews, and 120 are either 5-star or 4-star.) Here’s what James Greenamyer “dayglowjim” had to say:

Witty, and to the point!

Greta Christina puts it all together with this little book, and she’s funny while she does it! I laughed more than one time out loud while I read this, and I think she hit most of the reasons that I find believers so irritating. A really great read!

Thanks, James! And if any of you have read Why Are You Atheists So Angry?, it’d be awesome if you’d post a review.

***

Here, by the way, is ordering info for the book in all three formats — print, ebook, and audiobook!

Why Are You Atheists So AngryEbook editions:
The Kindle edition is available at Amazon.
The Nook edition is available at Barnes & Noble.
Smashwords has the book in multiple formats, including iBooks, Sony Reader, Kobo, Kindle (.mobi), Stanza, Aldiko, Adobe Digital Editions, any other reader that takes the Epub format, Palm Doc (PDB), PDF, RTF, Online Reading via HTML, and Plain Text for either downloading or viewing.
All ebook editions and formats cost just $7.99.

Print edition:
The print edition is available at Powell’s Books.
The print edition is also available at Amazon. However, be advised (if you haven’t been already) that seriously abusive labor practices have been reported at Amazon warehouses. Please bear that in mind when you’re deciding where to buy my book — or indeed, where to buy anything. (For the record: Powell’s employees are unionized.) Again, that’s the link for Amazon US — it’s available in other regions as well.
The print edition is available at Last Gasp.
The print edition is $14.95 USD. It is published by Pitchstone Publishing.

Wholesale sales of the print edition:
Bookstores and other retailers can get the book from Ingram, Baker & Taylor, and other standard wholesale distributors. It can also be purchased directly from the publisher, Pitchstone Publishing.

Audiobook edition:
The audiobook version is available at Audible.
The audiobook version is available on iTunes.
The audiobook version is available on Amazon.
And yes, I did the recording for it!


Comforting Thoughts book cover oblong 100 JPGComing Out Atheist Bendingwhy are you atheists so angryGreta Christina is author of four books: Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God, Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why, Why Are You Atheists So Angry? 99 Things That Piss Off the Godless, and Bending: Dirty Kinky Stories About Pain, Power, Religion, Unicorns, & More.

“A clear perspective of death”: Amazon Customer Review of “Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God”

Got a really nice customer review on Amazon of Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God. Five stars out of five. (In fact, the book now has four Amazon customer reviews, and all four are five stars.) Here’s what Matthew O’Neil had to say:

An excellent read!

Author Greta Christina has delivered an excellent, concise, quick read on the atheist perspective of death and the afterlife. Not only is it a clear perspective of death and the (lack of) life after, but she presents the philosophical problems with mainstream religious thought on the afterlife. More comforting is the resource guide she makes available for those coping with loss and looking for support, minus the supernatural hoopla. Well done!

Thanks, Matthew! And if any of you have read Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God, it’d be awesome if you’d post a review.

Comforting Thoughts book cover oblong 200 JPGThe Kindle ebook edition is available on Amazon (that’s the link for Amazon US, btw — it’s available in other regions as well); the Nook edition is available at Barnes & Noble; and the Smashwords edition is available on Smashwords. All ebook editions are $2.99. You can get the audiobook on Audible, Amazon, and iTunes. The audiobook is $2.99 (discounted slightly on Amazon, of course). (Plans for a print edition are in the works.)

Here’s the description of the book: [Read more…]

Greta Interviewed on “Atheists Talk” Radio Show/Podcast with Brianne Bilyeu!

Minnesota-AtheistsPodcast fans: I recently did an interview with the Atheists Talk radio show, and it’s available as a podcast! We talked about my new book, Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing To Do About God, and about atheist and humanist approaches to death and mortality.

Here’s what the folks at Atheists Talk say about the show:

Whether we call ourselves atheists, agnostics, nonbelievers, freethinkers or none of the above, we have likely all given some thought to the consequences of our non-belief. One of those consequences is the way that we view the concept of death, and more specifically the knowledge that we will one day die, as will every living being in existence. It can be quite a daunting topic to think about. As we well know, there are many ways that human beings comfort and protect themselves against the idea of death, but many of them are focused on the idea of an afterlife, reincarnation or other supernatural ideas, which leaves nonbelievers and skeptics out in the proverbial cold.

Here to continue the conversation of how non-believers perceive the ideas and field the existential questions surrounding death and the meaning of a finite life is Greta Christina with her newly published book Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing To Do With God. Greta Christina tackles hard philosophical questions in a relaxed, conversational tone, and one cannot help but be…comforted…by the thoughts and ideas that she lays out.

If you enjoy podcasts, I hope you’ll check this one out!

Comforting Thoughts book coveComforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing To Do About God is available in ebook at Kindle/Amazon (that’s the link for Amazon US — it’s available in other regions as well), Nook/Barnes & Noble, and Smashwords. The audiobook is available at Audible, Amazon, and iTunes. All ebook and audiobook editions are just $2.99. And yes, I did the recording for the audiobook. (Plans for a print edition are in the works, but there’s currently no publication date scheduled.)


Comforting Thoughts book cover oblong 100 JPGComing Out Atheist Bendingwhy are you atheists so angryGreta Christina is author of four books: Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God, Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why, Why Are You Atheists So Angry? 99 Things That Piss Off the Godless, and Bending: Dirty Kinky Stories About Pain, Power, Religion, Unicorns, & More.

“Clear-eyed conversation about death and grief”: Valerie Tarico on “Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God”

From the time our daughters were little, one of my husband’s goals and mine has been to help them deal with grief without resorting to false hope or superstition. When small pets died, we created a simple family ritual about the natural cycle of birth and death — and we celebrated the life, however brief. When a friend’s suicide left them in anguish, we talked through the pain that can make living unbearable. When a companion animal’s suffering became obvious, we released that life together. We talk together often about the relationships, wonders, and sense of purpose that make life meaningful to us. When Greta Christina’s small, thoughtful book of musings about death becomes available, each of our girls will receive a copy.

Cheeky, smart, unflinchingly honest, and deeply personal (as always) — Greta Christina is a perfect guide for nontheists who are looking for clear-eyed conversation about death and grief. The comforts she offers are powerful because they require no denial or self-delusion and instead are rooted in gratitude and wonder at the gift of life — and the precious opportunities made all the more acute by their transience.

Comforting Thoughts book cover oblong 200 JPGGot a really nice blurb about my new book, Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God, from Valerie Tarico, Ph.D., psychologist, and author of Trusting Doubt: A Former Evangelical Looks at Old Beliefs in a New Light. Thanks so much, Valerie!

The ebook is available at Kindle/Amazon (that’s the link for Amazon US — it’s available in other regions as well), Nook/Barnes & Noble, and Smashwords. The audiobook is available at Audible, Amazon, and iTunes. All ebook and audiobook editions are just $2.99. And yes, I did the recording for the audiobook. (Plans for a print edition are in the works, but there’s currently no publication date scheduled.)

Here is the description of the book: [Read more…]

Radical

(Content note: mentions of racism, rape denialism, domestic violence, homophobia. Also some use of mental illness language used as insult in quoted passage.)

I’ve been thinking about the word “radical.”

Lore Sjöberg recently posted this on Facebook (reprinted here with permission, not linked to by his request):

Here’s a thought experiment I’ve been mulling over. Say I was transported back in time to the 1950s. I’m surrounded by a culture that contains all the sexism and racism on display in Mad Men, and more on top of that.

I would be surrounded by repulsive things, ranging from cartoons about buck-toothed “Chinamen,” ads making jokes about smacking the little lady if she gets out of hand, rolled eyes at any implication that a woman could be raped by her husband, and the cultural certainty that gay people are, at best, just plain crazy.

How could I live with this? If I speak up about a tenth of the terrible things I saw, I’ll be seen as a bizarre radical if not an outright loon. Even if I become an activist, I’ll probably be the activist that everyone points at to say “Well, at least I’m not as extreme as HE is!”

(And all of this is not even addressing the question of what it would be like to actually BE a woman, or a person of color, or a gay man in that era.)

All of this is to say that sometimes I feel like I’m already in the Fifties. One of the complaints leveled against feminists, and feminist women in particular, is that they see sexism everywhere and they make a big deal out of things that everyone, even most women, think is just fine.

Well, yeah! There IS sexism everywhere, and a lot of the things that aren’t a big deal today are nonetheless sexist, just like naming a sports team “The Redskins” in 1932 was racist even if it seemed like good fun at the time. I certainly don’t agree with every statement by every progressive activist — that would be impossible anyway, progressives don’t agree on everything — but a lot of times I find myself reading about controversies and thinking “Yep, that’s radical, and it’s extremist, and it’s unreasonable. But it’s also absolutely correct and in another few decades it will be considered common sense.”

I’ve been thinking about this. And I’ve been realizing what an empty, lazy insult it is to call someone, or someone’s ideas, radical.

Rules_for_Radicals coverLore is absolutely right. Many ideas that were once seen as radical, and not that long ago either, have survived vigorous criticism and the test of time, and are now entirely mainstream. It was once considered radical to see black people as fully human, deserving of all the dignity and liberty and rights as any human. It was once considered radical to think that gay people weren’t morally corrupt or mentally ill, and to see same-sex love and sex and relationships as even remotely acceptable. (In fact, I remember seeing an archival TV interview with a gay activist in the late ’60s or early ’70s, who said that of course gay people weren’t advocating for marriage or adoption rights — that was ridiculous.) Until the 1970s, it was legal in the United States for husbands to rape their wives, and it took until 1993 for marital rape to be a crime in all 50 states. I could come up with a long list of many more examples, right off the top of my head. (Suggestions for others are invited in the comments.)

All these ideas were considered radical — until they weren’t.

In other words: An idea can be radical, and still be right.

In other other words: Insulting an idea (or a person) simply because they’re radical is an empty insult, devoid of any actual critical content. [Read more…]

Greta Interviewed by Dan Barker and Annie Laurie Gaylor on the FFRF Radio Show/Podcast!

ffrf_logoPodcast fans: I’ve done an interview with Dan Barker and Annie Laurie Gaylor on Freethought Radio, the Freedom From Religion Foundation’s weekly radio show and podcast. Dan and Annie Laurie start the show talking about three recent movies with freethought connections. Then they get into the question, “How do atheists deal with death?” That’s where they interview me — talking about my new book, Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing To Do About God. Finally, they talk with Barbara Mancini, who was arrested and prosecuted for handing her terminally ill 93-yr-old father prescribed medicine that he requested, a charge of “assisted suicide” that was religiously and politically motivated, and ultimately dismissed.

It was an interesting conversation on my end: Dan and Annie Laurie interviewed me with a blend of seriousness and lightness, taking the topic of death and grief seriously while at the same time injecting irreverent humor. If you enjoy podcasts, I hope you’ll check this one out!

Comforting Thoughts book coveComforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing To Do About God is available in ebook at Kindle/Amazon (that’s the link for Amazon US — it’s available in other regions as well), Nook/Barnes & Noble, and Smashwords. The audiobook is available at Audible, Amazon, and iTunes. All ebook and audiobook editions are just $2.99. And yes, I did the recording for the audiobook. (Plans for a print edition are in the works, but there’s currently no publication date scheduled.)


Comforting Thoughts book cover oblong 100 JPGComing Out Atheist Bendingwhy are you atheists so angryGreta Christina is author of four books: Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God, Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why, Why Are You Atheists So Angry? 99 Things That Piss Off the Godless, and Bending: Dirty Kinky Stories About Pain, Power, Religion, Unicorns, & More.

Unconditional Basic Income: Imagine the World

Please note: This post has a different comment policy from the usual one. It’s at the end of the post.

Imagine a world where nobody was homeless or starving.

nickel and dimed coverImagine a world where poor people weren’t sucked into the misery of the poverty cycle. Imagine a world where being poor didn’t mean you had to stay poor forever: where you could put some time and work into getting out of poverty, going to school or learning a marketable skill or just sticking with a job you liked reasonably well and rising up in it, instead of working exhausting dead-end jobs for your entire life. Imagine a world where being poor didn’t mean your children would almost certainly be poor, and their children, and their children. Imagine a world where being poor meant you weren’t super-comfortable, you didn’t have much in the way of luxuries — but you’d basically be okay.

Imagine a world where every child had basic security. Not luxury, or even comfort — just security. Imagine a world where every child knew that, no matter what happened to their parents, they’d have a place to live, and enough food to eat.

Imagine a world where getting sick didn’t mean the risk of ruining your life.

Imagine a world where getting help from your society didn’t mean navigating an exhausting, labyrinthine, humiliating, demoralizing government bureaucracy. Imagine a world where your life couldn’t be ruined by one small slip-up of this bureaucracy: one clueless clerk, one piece of overlooked paperwork, one mis-typed address.

Imagine a world where college students could stay in school, and really focus their attention on school.

Imagine a world where entrepreneurs could start small businesses or non-profit organizations, without the fear that if they failed, they’d be ruined for life.

Imagine a world where writers and musicians and other artists could pursue their art, without fear of permanent poverty. Imagine a world full of painting and music, theater and writing, photography and sculpture and quilts and fashion and stand-up comedy and juggling acts, made by artists who had time and energy to finish their work. Imagine a world where artists could make artistic and career decisions based on something other than, “Will I pay the rent this month?”

Imagine a world where activists could put all their time and energy into activism if they so chose.

Imagine a world where people pursued work, not out of desperation, but out of desire for more in the way of luxury and comfort, or for the satisfaction of doing something valuable, or both. [Read more…]

“Good read for closeted and out atheists alike”: Amazon Customer Review of “Coming Out Atheist”

Got a nice customer review on Amazon for Coming Out Atheist: How To Do It, How to Help Each Other Do It, And Why! Five stars out of five. (In fact, the book now has 35 customer reviews — and 30 of them are either four- or five-star!) Here’s what Carla A. Burris, a.k.a. “tekvet,” had to say:

Good read for closeted and out atheists alike

Even though this book is aimed at atheists/agnostics/humanists etc that are in the closet and are thinking about coming out, I still found it valuable from my out-and-vocal-for-years perspective. The closeted nonbeliever will find excellent advice on when, how, and if they should consider coming out. After outlining general advice that would apply to anyone, she drills down to special considerations for family, friends, students, women, POC, LBGT — even non-believing clergy.

As a very ‘out’ atheist, I didn’t expect to find a lot of information that applied to me, but I was wrong. Greta included chapters on helping others come out, community-building, and diversity considerations — all topics that resonated with me. The final section of the book includes an extensive list of resources from websites to books to podcasts that will be of interest to out and closeted atheists alike.

The best part about this book? Greta writes just as she speaks. It was like spending a few hours with her sitting behind my shoulder telling me stories and sharing what she’s learned.

Thanks, Carla! And if any of you have read Coming Out Atheist, it’d be awesome if you’d post a review.

***

Here, by the way, is ordering info for the book in all three formats — print, ebook, and audiobook!

Coming Out Atheist cover 150Ebook edition:
The Kindle edition is available on Amazon. (That’s the link for Amazon US, btw — it’s available in other regions as well.)
The Nook edition is available at Barnes & Noble.
The Smashwords edition is available on Smashwords. Right now, it’s only available on Smashwords in epub format: I’m working to make it available in other formats.
All ebook editions and formats cost just $9.99.

Print edition: [Read more…]