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Apr 21 2014

“We have had some success, although we sure as hell need more”: Greta’s Interview with Black Skeptics

Black Skeptics: In the book you stress the value of engaging in debates about religion with believers to encourage questioning and coming out. However, as you acknowledge, debating the validity of religious belief is only one part of the equation. For example, the vast majority of LGBTQ people of color and straight people of color are faith-aligned/identified precisely because mainstream America is racially segregated, faith (for many) is a form of cultural “home space” and social welfare resources in communities of color are extremely impacted. What further “intersectional” steps need to be taken to promote humanistic communities beyond just “coming out”?

Greta Christina: I’m surprised to hear you say that — I don’t think I did stress the value of debating with believers all that much. I mention in the book, but I don’t give it much space, and I mostly mention it because I actually advise against having those debates while you’re in process of coming out to people. I think that’s the wrong time for those debates. It is true that I think debating believers can be useful and valuable: a lot of atheists rag on other atheists for getting into those debates, insisting that they never work and are always a waste of time, so I think they deserve defending. And it can be difficult to draw a clear line between simply explaining your atheism, and explaining why you think religion is bunk. That’s one of the main reasons I talk about the topic at all. But it’s certainly not something I think everyone should do, I don’t think it’s a moral imperative or anything, and I think lots of other forms of activism are valuable.

So, with that being cleared up. The answer to your main question: Yes, for lots of people of color, faith is a home: it’s where people get social services, social support, a sense of identity and continuity and stability and history, and more. (It does seem that it can be a toxic home — that’s one of the takeaways I got from Candace Gorham’s book, “The Ebony Exodus Project,” I kept being struck throughout the book by how so many black women found their churches unsupportive and actually undermining. But it’s still a home.) So one of the biggest intersectional steps that godless communities can take is to make atheism a safer place to land for these folks. We need to look at what people of color are getting from their faith communities, and do more in our own communities to provide it. It wouldn’t suck if we did more to make some of these needs less necessary while we’re at it: to do political work on poverty and safety nets and institutional racism and so on. And no, that’s not “mission drift”: if local atheist communities can do blood drives and roadside cleanups and so on, there’s no reason they can’t do this sort of political work, too. And we need to be willing to take a hard look at the ways that we actually make our spaces unwelcoming: not just with racism of omission (e.g., failing to recognize what these folks need and provide it), but with more overt racism of commission. And all this actually does go back to the question of debates about religion: there’s not much point — strategically, poltically, or indeed morally — in arguing people out of religion if we don’t provide them a safe place to land if we succeed.

***

Coming Out Atheist cover 150Thus begins my interview with Black Skeptics. We talk about assorted issues with intersectionality: what intersectional steps humanist communities need to take, how we can shift the leadership of our organizations, whether atheist feminists need to focus more on ways that women of color are marginalized (hint — yes), how to prioritize our issues and get others interested in our priorities, and more. And, of course, we talk about my new book, Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why — and how coming out fits into these intersectional interviews. Smart, thoughtful questions that really made me think carefully. (And they call the book “timely and insightful,” which makes me happy.) Enjoy!

Apr 18 2014

Are Addicts and the Mentally Ill Responsible for Their Behavior?

Are people with mental illness responsible for their behavior, and for how their behavior affects others? If so, to what degree? Does the degree of mental illness affect how we answer this question?

I’ve been thinking about this question for a long, long time. Many years, in fact. I’ve been thinking about it harder in the last year or so, since my father died, and since my most recent bout with depression. I’ve been thinking about it in terms of my own life and my own mental health; I’ve been thinking about it in terms of the lives and mental health (healths?) of my friends and family members who are dealing with mental illness, or who have dealt with it in the past. But mostly, I’m thinking about it in terms of my father.

My father died on Oct. 1, 2012. Dad was a pretty mixed bag: many wonderful qualities, many not-so-wonderful ones. Specifically, he was an alcoholic, apretty bad one for many decades, and a significantly worse one as the years and decades wore on. And largely due to his alcoholism, he often behaved very badly. He wasn’t abusive, but he was often selfish, irresponsible, callous, quick with a barbed comment or a cruel joke just for his own entertainment, dismissive of other people’s feelings, unconcerned with how his actions affected others. It got worse, much worse, as the years went on and the disease of alcoholism progressed.

By the time he had his first stroke, the alcoholism had advanced to late-stage, brain-damage, memory- and speech-impairment territory, and the accompanying selfishness and irresponsibility got worse with the deterioration. (According to the doctors, the years of alcoholism almost certainly contributed to the stroke itself, and may have even been a primary cause.)

I don’t want to get into the litany of the details of his behavior right now. It’s too upsetting, and it’s kind of not the point. The point — the question I’ve spent decades asking myself, as I kept taking step after step away from my father and it kept not being far enough — is this: To what degree are mentally ill people — including alcoholics and other drug addicts — responsible for their behavior?

*****

Thus begins my latest piece for AlterNet, Are Addicts and the Mentally Ill Responsible for Their Behavior?. To read more about some of the many sides of this complicated and difficult question, read the rest of the piece.

Apr 18 2014

“Some people need help leaving closets, she posits”: Digital Cuttlefish’s Verse About “Coming Out Atheist”!

Some godless are “out” very loudly and proudly,
Some stay in the closet for decades or more–
The former will find Greta’s writing exciting;
The latter, of course, are the folks that it’s for…

Okay, I am ridiculously excited about this.

digital cuttlefish iconWhen The Digital Cuttlefish — poet laureate of the atheist blogosphere — got a review copy of Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why, he offered to review it in verse… and asked me if there were any verse forms I was particularly fond of. Being a smart-aleck, I said that I was fond of sestinas and villanelles — but that a limerick or a song parody would also make me entirely happy.

Well, he didn’t write a sestina. He apparently is allergic to sestinas. (Understandably so– it’s kind of a ridiculous verse form, and I was only semi-serious in even suggestin git.) So instead, he’s written a review of Coming Out Atheist — in the form of a sepielle.

I am excited about this out of all proportion. Check it out!

Oh, and here is ordering info for the book, in all three formats — print, ebook, and audiobook.

Coming Out Atheist cover 150Ebook edition:

The Kindle edition is available on Amazon. (That’s the link for Amazon US, btw — it’s available in other regions as well.)

The Nook edition is available at Barnes & Noble.

The Smashwords edition is available on Smashwords. Right now, it’s only available on Smashwords in epub format: I’m working to make it available in other formats.

All ebook editions and formats cost just $9.99.

Print edition:

The print edition is now available through Powell’s Books.

The print edition is also available at Amazon. However, be advised (if you haven’t been already) that seriously abusive labor practices have been reported at Amazon warehouses. Please bear that in mind when you’re deciding where to buy my book — or indeed, where to buy anything. (For the records: Powell’s employees are unionized.) Again, that’s the link for Amazon US — it’s available in other regions as well.

The print edition is $17.95 USD. It is being published by Pitchstone Publishing.

Wholesale sales of the print edition:

Bookstores and other retailers can get the book from Ingram, Baker & Taylor, and other standard wholesale distributors. It can also be purchased directly from the publisher, Pitchstone Publishing.

Audiobook edition:

The audiobook version is available on Audible.

The audiobook is also available through Amazon.

The audiobook is also available through iTunes.

And yes, I did the recording for it!

Apr 18 2014

Podcast Interviews with Phil Ferguson at “Skeptic Money” and the Matthew Filipowicz Show!

Hi, podcast fans! I’ve being doing some podcast and radio interviews lately, plugging my new book Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why — and two of them are up now!

Skeptic-Money-on-Air-LogoThere’s one with Phil Ferguson of the Skeptic Money blog and podcast. We talk about difficulties coming out as an atheist; how coming out is different for different people; what atheists can learn from other atheists’ coming-out stories; how to decide not only when to come out but whether to do it at all; why it’s generally better to come out sooner rather than later if you can; and more.

Matthew-Filipowicz-Show-iconThe other is with the Matthew Filipowicz Show. We talk about why it’s important for atheists for atheists to come out; how coming out makes things better for ourselves and others; a few basic guidelines for coming out; how to deal with arguments about whether God exists; the pros and cons of the “no big deal” method of coming out; methods for coming out in the workplace versus coming out to family and friends; and more; how to support other atheists in coming out; and more. (Matthew’s other guest is Betsy Leondar-Wright, author of Missing Class: Strengthening Social Movement Groups by Seeing Class Cultures, and that’s a really interesting interview as well.)

Enjoy! And once again, here’s ordering information for the book if you’re interested — in ebook, print, and audiobook.

Coming Out Atheist cover 150Ebook edition:

The Kindle edition is available on Amazon. (That’s the link for Amazon US, btw — it’s available in other regions as well.)

The Nook edition is available at Barnes & Noble.

The Smashwords edition is available on Smashwords. Right now, it’s only available on Smashwords in epub format: I’m working to make it available in other formats.

All ebook editions and formats cost just $9.99.

Print edition:

The print edition is now available through Powell’s Books.

The print edition is also available at Amazon. However, be advised (if you haven’t been already) that seriously abusive labor practices have been reported at Amazon warehouses. Please bear that in mind when you’re deciding where to buy my book — or indeed, where to buy anything. (For the records: Powell’s employees are unionized.) Again, that’s the link for Amazon US — it’s available in other regions as well.

The print edition is $17.95 USD. It is being published by Pitchstone Publishing.

Wholesale sales of the print edition:

Bookstores and other retailers can get the book from Ingram, Baker & Taylor, and other standard wholesale distributors. It can also be purchased directly from the publisher, Pitchstone Publishing.

Audiobook edition:

The audiobook version is available on Audible.

The audiobook is also available through Amazon.

The audiobook is also available through iTunes.

And yes, I did the recording for it!

Apr 18 2014

“How harshly should we judge the Church?”

Trigger warning: Burning at the stake and other torture

In response to my earlier post on the burning at the stake of Giordano Bruno, and modern Catholics who try to rationalize it, I got this comment from petersen:

I think you’re confusing two separate issues: the morality of the action and the blameworthiness of the people who took that action. In the lines from Hess you quote, he says that, in his estimation, the execution of Bruno was wrong. He then points out the *historical* fact that at the time, such executions were accepted. So we can say that the Church acted wrongly. But how harshly should we judge the Church for what it did? When the Church executed Bruno, it was acting within a political-philosophical system that allowed and justified such executions. Such a system does not exist today. So what today seems outrageously immoral would at that time have seemed permissible. Now, we can say that a system like that (i.e., a system that allows executions like Bruno’s,) is a bad one and should not exist. But given that it did exist – and that the Church existed within that system – we cannot judge the Church as harshly for executing Bruno as we could if it did the same thing today. The Church acted in a way consistent with its context. When we’re deciding how blameworthy the Church is, we have to take into account the context in which the action occurred; we cannot simply graft our own standards onto another era’s and blame people accordingly. This doesn’t mean that it wasn’t wrong to burn Bruno. That’s wrong no matter the circumstances. But that the Church’s guilt is lessened by its circumstances – its mitigating circumstances.

Are you freaking serious?

Okay. Let’s take this apart a piece at a time.

I think you’re confusing two separate issues: the morality of the action and the blameworthiness of the people who took that action.

????? That’s what the morality of an action means — how blameworthy (or praiseworthy) the person is who took the action. Yes, some actions are morally complex, and circumstances can affect that. If the morality is complicated, the blameworthiness or praiseworthiness of the people who took the action are complicated, and vice versa. But that’s still what morality means.

In the lines from Hess you quote, he says that, in his estimation, the execution of Bruno was wrong.

Yes. And then he goes on to make excuses for it, to trivialize it, to rationalize it — and to chide “Cosmos” for holding the Church responsible for it.

But how harshly should we judge the Church for what it did? When the Church executed Bruno, it was acting within a political-philosophical system that allowed and justified such executions.

And here’s where we get into the truly ugly meat of the matter.

?????

The Church were, in large part, the ones who created the political-philosophical system. They were largely responsible for it. It’s not like they were serfs in a serfdom. They held the power. They were the ones who created the system that allowed and justified these executions. Why should they not be held responsible for it?

Now, we can say that a system like that (i.e., a system that allows executions like Bruno’s,) is a bad one and should not exist. But given that it did exist – and that the Church existed within that system – we cannot judge the Church as harshly for executing Bruno as we could if it did the same thing today.

YES WE CAN. That is exactly my point. Some things are not only wrong — they are unquestionably wrong, and have always been wrong.

The Church acted in a way consistent with its context. When we’re deciding how blameworthy the Church is, we have to take into account the context in which the action occurred

And once again: They created the context. They were the ones in power.

we cannot simply graft our own standards onto another era’s and blame people accordingly.

YES WE CAN. There are some instances where moral relativism is reasonable. Burning people at the stake is not one of them.

But that the Church’s guilt is lessened by its circumstances – its mitigating circumstances.

They were the ones setting the circumstances. They were the ones in power. And they abused that power in one of the most grotesque ways imaginable. They put Bruno in prison for years. They deliberated carefully, and cold-bloodedly chose to burn him. They paraded him through the streets. When he responded to the screaming crowds, they silenced him by ramming metal spikes through his cheeks and tongue and lips — in the form of a cross. They tied him to a stake. They piled fuel under his feet. They set him on fire. They watched as he burned to death. (As the people who try to terrorize kids about Hell say: Think about what it feels like to have your hand in a flame for even a second — and now think about what it would feel like to have your entire body in flames, and to be helpless to escape from it, and to have it continue for as long as it took to end your life.) They did this in public — as spectacle, and as warning to others. And they did all this, solely and entirely, because they didn’t like the fact that he openly disagreed with their opinions. To speak of how their “guilt is lessened” by “mitigating circumstances” is morally repugnant.

What they did was wrong. It was terribly, horribly wrong. It was vile and despicable. It was among the worst things human beings could possibly do to other human beings, and for among the worst possible reasons. How hard is it to just say that? How hard is it to say it, with no minimizing, rationalization, or excuses?

What the hell is wrong with you?

Apr 17 2014

“Greta Christina has a question for closeted atheists”: Religion News Service Story on “Coming Out Atheist”

(RNS) Greta Christina has a question for closeted atheists: Ask your openly gay and lesbian friends if their lives are better for coming out.

The answer, almost universally, she claims, is yes.

That’s the message of her new book, “Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why.” A well-known atheist activist, author, blogger and speaker, Christina will speak at the American Atheists convention in Salt Lake City this weekend (April 17-20), an event geared to raising the public profile of those who do not believe in God.

Coming Out Atheist coverThus begins the story on Religion News Service — the wire service for news stories about religion — on my new book Coming Out Atheist: New book exhorts atheists to ‘come out’ of the closet.

It’s a good story: it covers both how atheists are stigmatized and why coming out helps. And it does a good job drawing parallels between the atheist movement and the LGBT movement — which I think makes the story more personal, and gets the issues across to people who might not be familiar with them. Many thanks to the story’s author, Kimberly Winston!

So I have a quick favor to ask y’all. If you — or anyone you know — works for a newspaper that uses wire service stories, please let them know about this! Getting this into mainstream papers could get out the word about the book — and the ideas in it — to a lot of people who aren’t cued into organized atheism and might not otherwise hear about it. (The RNS story about Grief Beyond Belief was how it got into USA Today.) This piece has been picked up by the Washington Post — if more papers pick it up, it could get the word out to more people who really need it. Thanks!

And here, once again, is ordering information for the book if you’re interested — in ebook, print, and audiobook.

Ebook edition:

The Kindle edition is available on Amazon. (That’s the link for Amazon US, btw — it’s available in other regions as well.)

The Nook edition is available at Barnes & Noble.

The Smashwords edition is available on Smashwords. Right now, it’s only available on Smashwords in epub format: I’m working to make it available in other formats.

All ebook editions and formats cost just $9.99.

Print edition:

The print edition is now available through Powell’s Books.

The print edition is also available at Amazon. However, be advised (if you haven’t been already) that seriously abusive labor practices have been reported at Amazon warehouses. Please bear that in mind when you’re deciding where to buy my book — or indeed, where to buy anything. (For the records: Powell’s employees are unionized.) Again, that’s the link for Amazon US — it’s available in other regions as well.

The print edition is $17.95 USD. It is being published by Pitchstone Publishing.

Wholesale sales of the print edition:

Bookstores and other retailers can get the book from Ingram, Baker & Taylor, and other standard wholesale distributors. It can also be purchased directly from the publisher, Pitchstone Publishing.

Audiobook edition:

The audiobook version is available on Audible.

The audiobook is also available through Amazon.

The audiobook is also available through iTunes.

And yes, I did the recording for it!

Apr 17 2014

Special SSA Student Discount for “Coming Out Atheist”!

Coming Out Atheist coverAre you a student in a Secular Student Alliance group? If so, you can get my new book, Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why, at a special discount rate!

We — that is to say, myself and my publisher, Pitchstone Publishing — understand just how important the student atheist movement is to the atheist movement as a whole: both for its future, and for its present. We also understand that coming out can be particularly challenging for atheist students. And we understand that money can be particularly challenging for students as well.

So Pitchstone is generously offering a student discount on Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why. (The print edition, that is, not the ebook or audiobook.) If Secular Student Alliance groups buy five (5) or more copies at once directly from Pitchstone, they’ll sell them to you at a 40% discount off the $17.95 cover price. Plus they’ll give you free shipping! (Free shipping only applies to groups in the United States.)

To take advantage of this offer, or to find out more, email [email protected]

And if you’re not a student in a Secular Student Alliance group, you can still buy the book! Just not at the student discount. Here’s ordering information. Enjoy!

Ebook edition:

The Kindle edition is available on Amazon. (That’s the link for Amazon US, btw — it’s available in other regions as well.)

The Nook edition is available at Barnes & Noble.

The Smashwords edition is available on Smashwords. Right now, it’s only available on Smashwords in epub format: I’m working to make it available in other formats.

All ebook editions and formats cost just $9.99.

Print edition:

The print edition is now available through Powell’s Books.

The print edition is also available at Amazon. However, be advised (if you haven’t been already) that seriously abusive labor practices have been reported at Amazon warehouses. Please bear that in mind when you’re deciding where to buy my book — or indeed, where to buy anything. (For the records: Powell’s employees are unionized.) Again, that’s the link for Amazon US — it’s available in other regions as well.

You can also get it through your local bookstore — it’s being distributed by standard wholesalers (including Ingram and Baker & Taylor), and most bookstores should be able to get it.

The print edition is $17.95 USD. It is being published by Pitchstone Publishing.

Wholesale sales of the print edition:

Bookstores and other retailers can get the book from Ingram, Baker & Taylor, and other standard wholesale distributors. It can also be purchased directly from the publisher, Pitchstone Publishing.

Audiobook edition:

The audiobook version is available on Audible. And yes, I did the recording for it! (It will very likely be on Amazon and iTunes soon.)

Here, by the way, is the description of the book, and some wonderfully flattering blurbs. Read the rest of this entry »

Apr 17 2014

How Religious Fundamentalism, Ironically, Leads to a Screwed-Up Moral Relativism

Trigger warning: Burning at the stake and other torture

It is odd therefore that Cosmos focuses almost exclusively on the marginal case of Giordano Bruno. Of course, I am not defending Bruno’s persecution and death—no decent human being now would ever condone burning a person alive for any reason. Moreover, in 2014 we view legitimate theological dissent very differently than did our ancestors.

But the circumstances were quite different 400 years ago. According to the 16th century Italian legal code and the customs of Renaissance politics, Bruno was judged by an ecclesiastical court to be an obdurate heretic for refusing to cease in promulgating his theological ideas. As such he was deserving of capital punishment and was turned over for execution by the civil arm in Rome. In the 21st century we inhabit a very different era, a religiously pluralistic age of largely secular states in which the nature and exercise of authority are vastly different than they were in Post-Reformation Italy.
-Peter Hess, co-author of Catholicism and Science, for the NCSE blog, commenting on the new TV show, “Cosmos”

giordano bruno burning at stakeI see. Circumstances were different 400 years ago. According to the 16th century Italian legal code. We inhabit a very different era. So therefore, it’s not reasonable or fair to criticize the Catholic Church of the 16th century for burning Giordano Bruno at the stake.

It’s hard not to read this, and think about all the religious believers who insist that without belief in God, we would have no solid foundation for morality.

It hadn’t occurred to me before in quite this way. But religious fundamentalism and dogma doesn’t just often end up being morally relativistic in some screwed-up ways. It positively demands it. If you’re going to insist that a holy book written hundreds or thousands of years ago is the permanent and perfect moral guidebook written by God — then you’re stuck with defending behaviors that were considered ethical and even admirable at the time they were written, but that we now recognize as morally repulsive.

It’s a funny thing. Religious believers — especially the fundamentalist ones, or the ones attached to specific religious dogma or an authoritative religious structure — are always going on about the horrors of secular moral relativism. They’re always going on about how, without a belief in an ultimate divine moral arbiter, we would be morally lost: unmoored, unanchored, unable to distinguish right from wrong, basing our moral choices solely on what we find immediately self-serving or convenient.

But it isn’t the atheists who are excusing, defending, minimizing, and rationalizing the burning at the stake of Giordano Bruno. Read the rest of this entry »

Apr 17 2014

“A Must-Read Book”: Kaveh Mousavi on “Coming Out Atheist”

I saw a fundamental respect for all of these different walks of life in the book. Greta Christina never goes off the grid, assuming things about people, forcing a view from a dramatic point of view. This is not a revolutionary book, written with the content to enlist as many soldiers to the cause with disregard to their individuality and safety – Greta Christina very clearly states that “we want no martyrs”. This is not a pamphlet. There is genuine sense of concern for the safety and well-being of the reader. It’s a humane and empathetic book. Ultimately, that’s even more reason to love this book.

On the On the Margin of Error blog, Kaveh Mousavi has written a review of Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why — one that’s both very flattering and very thoughtful. I’m going to give you one more quote, where he talks about why this book is valuable even to atheists who are already out:

Of course, I’m not the intended reader of this book – I’m an already an “out” atheist, in a situation that being out is not quite pleasant, so I need no convincing that coming out is a good thing to do, and I have already burned all the bridges so coming out tips may not be useful to me now because it’s too late – but this book is quite valuable for another reason. To me the main value of this book was that it helped me to understand other atheists from other walks of life and their struggle better. I could understand things like struggling with families and friends, etc.

Coming Out Atheist cover 150Mousavi is an atheist in Iran, and his perspective on the book’s “Theocracies (Overt and De Facto)” chapter is particularly insightful. I researched that chapter extra-carefully, and was happy with how it came out (as is Mousavi) — but I am wishing I’d gotten his input before I finalized the book. He has ideas and perspectives on the topic that are very valuable. If I write a second edition, I’ll almost certainly incorporate it. Check it out!

Here’s ordering info for the book, in all formats — ebook, print, and audiobook.

Ebook edition:

The Kindle edition is available on Amazon. (That’s the link for Amazon US, btw — it’s available in other regions as well.)

The Nook edition is available at Barnes & Noble.

The Smashwords edition is available on Smashwords. Right now, it’s only available on Smashwords in epub format: I’m working to make it available in other formats.

All ebook editions and formats cost just $9.99.

Print edition:

The print edition is now available through Powell’s Books.

The print edition is also available at Amazon. However, be advised (if you haven’t been already) that seriously abusive labor practices have been reported at Amazon warehouses. Please bear that in mind when you’re deciding where to buy my book — or indeed, where to buy anything. (For the records: Powell’s employees are unionized.) Again, that’s the link for Amazon US — it’s available in other regions as well.

You can also get it through your local bookstore — it’s being distributed by standard wholesalers (including Ingram and Baker & Taylor), and most bookstores should be able to get it.

The print edition is $17.95 USD. It is being published by Pitchstone Publishing.

Wholesale sales of the print edition:

Bookstores and other retailers can get the book from Ingram, Baker & Taylor, and other standard wholesale distributors. It can also be purchased directly from the publisher, Pitchstone Publishing.

Audiobook edition:

The audiobook version is available on Audible. And yes, I did the recording for it! (It will very likely be on Amazon and iTunes soon.)

Apr 16 2014

“Coming Out Atheist” Is Out!

Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why is now available!

Coming Out Atheist cover

Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why, my guidebook to coming out as an atheist and supporting one another in doing it, is now available! It’s available in ebook, print, and audiobook editions. Here’s the ordering info! If you know people who you think would be interested in this book — please spread the word!

Ebook edition:

The Kindle edition is available on Amazon. (That’s the link for Amazon US, btw — it’s available in other regions as well.)

The Nook edition is available at Barnes & Noble.

The Smashwords edition is available on Smashwords. Right now, it’s only available on Smashwords in epub format: I’m working to make it available in other formats.

All ebook editions and formats cost just $9.99.

Print edition:

The print edition is now available through Powell’s Books.

The print edition is also available at Amazon. However, be advised (if you haven’t been already) that seriously abusive labor practices have been reported at Amazon warehouses. Please bear that in mind when you’re deciding where to buy my book — or indeed, where to buy anything. (For the records: Powell’s employees are unionized.) Again, that’s the link for Amazon US — it’s available in other regions as well.

You can also get it through your local bookstore — it’s being distributed by standard wholesalers (including Ingram and Baker & Taylor), and most bookstores should be able to get it.

The print edition is $17.95 USD. It is being published by Pitchstone Publishing.

Wholesale sales of the print edition:

Bookstores and other retailers can get the book from Ingram, Baker & Taylor, and other standard wholesale distributors. It can also be purchased directly from the publisher, Pitchstone Publishing.

Audiobook edition:

The audiobook version is available on Audible.

The audiobook is also available through Amazon.

The audiobook is also available through iTunes.

And yes, I did the recording for it!

Here is the description of the book, and some wonderfully flattering blurbs.

*

Coming out as an atheist is a powerful, liberating act. It makes life better for yourself, for other atheists, and for the world. But telling people you’re an atheist can be risky. What are the best ways to do it? And how can we help each other take this step?

In this compassionate, friendly, down-to-earth how-to guide, popular author and blogger Greta Christina (Why Are You Atheists So Angry? 99 Things That Piss Off the Godless) offers concrete strategies and guiding philosophies for coming out as an atheist. Based on hundreds of coming-out stories, the book offers a map of the territory atheists are likely to encounter — and ideas on how to pick the path that’s best for you.

This accessible, empathetic guide reflects a wide range of atheist coming-out experiences. It includes dedicated chapters on:

Family
Friends
Spouses and Partners
Work
The Internet
Parents
Students
Conservative Communities
The Already Marginalized
and much more.

For atheists who are already out, it gives practical ideas on how to help others join you in the sunlight. And for atheists who are on the fence, it offers guidance on making that decision — and gentle encouragement to take that step.

Inspiring and realistic, kind and powerful, Coming Out Atheist is the much-needed guidebook atheists have been waiting for.

Author Greta Christina is donating 10% of her income from this book to atheist organizations, charities, and projects.

REVIEWS

“Witty, wise, helpful, and humane, this clear and engaging book is most timely. ‘Coming Out Atheist’ is a great resource for the many Americans out there who have rejected religious faith and are moving towards embracing, acknowledging, and proclaiming their atheism.”
-Phil Zuckerman, Ph.D., author of “Faith No More: Why People Reject Religion” and “Society Without God: What the Least Religious Nations Can Tell Us About Contentment” Read the rest of this entry »

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