“A good no nonsense advice book”: Amazon Customer Review of “Coming Out Atheist”

Got a nice customer review on Amazon for Coming Out Atheist: How To Do It, How to Help Each Other Do It, And Why! Five stars out of five. (In fact, the book now has 35 customer reviews — and 30 of them are either four- or five-star!) Here’s what allen had to say:

A good no nonsense advice book

A good no nonsense advice book. Doesn’t claim to have all the answers but does help provide readers with options which may be a good fit for them

Thanks, allen! And if any of you have read Coming Out Atheist, it’d be awesome if you’d post a review.

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Here, by the way, is ordering info for the book in all three formats — print, ebook, and audiobook!

Coming Out Atheist cover 150Ebook edition:
The Kindle edition is available on Amazon. (That’s the link for Amazon US, btw — it’s available in other regions as well.)
The Nook edition is available at Barnes & Noble.
The Smashwords edition is available on Smashwords. Right now, it’s only available on Smashwords in epub format: I’m working to make it available in other formats.
All ebook editions and formats cost just $9.99.

Print edition: [Read more…]

“Telling the Truth, with Love”: Amazon Customer Review of “Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God”

Got a really nice customer review on Amazon of Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God. Five stars out of five. (In fact, the book now has three Amazon customer reviews, and all three are five stars.) Here’s what W. Noble, a.k.a. “noblebill,” had to say:

Telling the Truth, with Love

It’s easy to understand and to empathize with avoidances like “gone to a better place” or “passed through the veil.” But we don’t need those crutches to celebrate and honor the life of a loved one or friend. As a 76-year-old, contemplating the notion of ceasing I really value this worldwide collection of kindness and wisdom. Well-chosen, humane, deeply moving — and for the most part unlikely to trigger the religious among us. Thank you, Greta.

Thanks, noblebill! And if any of you have read Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God, it’d be awesome if you’d post a review.

Comforting Thoughts book cover oblong 200 JPGThe Kindle ebook edition is available on Amazon (that’s the link for Amazon US, btw — it’s available in other regions as well); the Nook edition is available at Barnes & Noble; and the Smashwords edition is available on Smashwords. All ebook editions are $2.99. You can get the audiobook on Audible, Amazon, and iTunes. The audiobook is $2.99 (discounted slightly on Amazon, of course). (Plans for a print edition are in the works.)

Here’s the description of the book:

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If you don’t believe in God or an afterlife — how do you cope with death?

Accepting death is never easy. But we don’t need religion to find peace, comfort, and solace in the face of death. In this mini-book collection of essays, prominent atheist author Greta Christina offers secular ways to handle your own mortality and the death of those you love.

Blending intensely personal experience with compassionate, down-to-earth wisdom, Christina (“Coming Out Atheist” and “Why Are You Atheists So Angry?”) explores a variety of natural philosophies of death. She shows how reality can be more comforting than illusion, shatters the myth that there are no atheists in foxholes — and tells how humanism got her through one of the grimmest times of her life.

“In this book Greta Christina tackles the subject of death with the insight of a philosopher and the relaxed candor of a friend — that really cool, intelligent friend who understands and cares.”
-David Niose, author of Fighting Back the Right: Reclaiming America from the Attack on Reason [Read more…]

Audiobook of “Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God” Now Available!

Comforting Thoughts book cover oblong 300The audiobook edition of my new book, Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God, is now available!

You can get the audiobook on Audible, Amazon, and iTunes. The audiobook price is $2.99 (discounted slightly on Amazon, of course).

And yes, I did the recording for it!

The book is also available as an ebook — on Kindle at Amazon (that’s the link for Amazon US, it’s available in other regions as well), on Nook at Barnes & Noble, and at Smashwords. All ebook editions and formats cost just $2.99.

Plans for a print edition are in the works, but the publication date is not currently scheduled.

Here’s the description of the book:

*

If you don’t believe in God or an afterlife — how do you cope with death?

Accepting death is never easy. But we don’t need religion to find peace, comfort, and solace in the face of death. In this mini-book collection of essays, prominent atheist author Greta Christina offers secular ways to handle your own mortality and the death of those you love.

Blending intensely personal experience with compassionate, down-to-earth wisdom, Christina (“Coming Out Atheist” and “Why Are You Atheists So Angry?”) explores a variety of natural philosophies of death. She shows how reality can be more comforting than illusion, shatters the myth that there are no atheists in foxholes — and tells how humanism got her through one of the grimmest times of her life.

“In this book Greta Christina tackles the subject of death with the insight of a philosopher and the relaxed candor of a friend — that really cool, intelligent friend who understands and cares.”
-David Niose, author of Fighting Back the Right: Reclaiming America from the Attack on Reason [Read more…]

“To those of us for whom traditional messages of comfort during grief do not work”: Sapphoq Reviews “Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God”

Like many atheists, I prefer to deal with the here and now rather than any promised reunion in some unnamed future [pre-rapture or post-rapture, it matters not to me] date. Advising me that “He’s in a better place,” or “Someday you’ll see him again,” feels like a denial of the totality of the loss of my father even though people don’t mean to discount my grief.

Those who identify as people of faith will find much to argue with in this book. I hasten to gently point out that this book was not written for believers. Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God was written for the rest of us– the atheists, agnostics, agnostic atheists, non-theists, free-thinkers, nones, brights. And so yes, I highly recommend Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God to those of us for whom traditional messages of comfort during grief do not work.

Comforting Thoughts book cover oblong 200 JPG There’s a very touching, thoughtful review of Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God, on the sapphoq reviews books and more blog, from an atheist whose father died less than a week ago. You can read the complete review here. sapphoq, I am so sorry for your loss. I’m touched that you would take the time to write this review at this terrible time, and I’m so glad the book has been helpful to you. That’s exactly why I wrote it.

The Kindle edition is available on Amazon (that’s the link for Amazon US, btw — it’s available in other regions as well); the Nook edition is available at Barnes & Noble; and the Smashwords edition is available on Smashwords. All ebook editions and formats cost just $2.99. (The audiobook version is scheduled for publication on December 30; plans for a print edition are in the works.)

Here’s the description of the book:

*

If you don’t believe in God or an afterlife — how do you cope with death?

Accepting death is never easy. But we don’t need religion to find peace, comfort, and solace in the face of death. In this mini-book collection of essays, prominent atheist author Greta Christina offers secular ways to handle your own mortality and the death of those you love.

Blending intensely personal experience with compassionate, down-to-earth wisdom, Christina (“Coming Out Atheist” and “Why Are You Atheists So Angry?”) explores a variety of natural philosophies of death. She shows how reality can be more comforting than illusion, shatters the myth that there are no atheists in foxholes — and tells how humanism got her through one of the grimmest times of her life. [Read more…]

“The best book on the atheist philosophy of death you are likely ever to read”: Richard Carrier on “Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God”

In less than eighty pages, Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God covers every essential base, and is really the book for an atheist to get for building a usable philosophy of death. I couldn’t think of anything she didn’t address, and she even addressed some aspects of the question that would never have occurred to me!

This little book cuts right to the essential ten or so questions that we should have answers to, and models how to figure those answers out. And all in thoroughly practical terms. This is a book about the philosophy of death that actually confronts the practical reality of it, and helps you come to practical terms with it.

In short, this is the best book on the atheist philosophy of death you are likely ever to read.

Comforting Thoughts book cover oblong 200 JPGRichard Carrier has written a really nice, concise-but-thorough review of my new book, Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God (now available in ebook). You can read the full review on his blog. Thanks, Richard!

The Kindle edition is available on Amazon (that’s the link for Amazon US, btw — it’s available in other regions as well); the Nook edition is available at Barnes & Noble; and the Smashwords edition is available on Smashwords. All ebook editions and formats cost just $2.99. (The audiobook version is scheduled for publication on December 30; plans for a print edition are in the works.)

Here’s the description of the book:

*

If you don’t believe in God or an afterlife — how do you cope with death?

Accepting death is never easy. But we don’t need religion to find peace, comfort, and solace in the face of death. In this mini-book collection of essays, prominent atheist author Greta Christina offers secular ways to handle your own mortality and the death of those you love.

Blending intensely personal experience with compassionate, down-to-earth wisdom, Christina (“Coming Out Atheist” and “Why Are You Atheists So Angry?”) explores a variety of natural philosophies of death. She shows how reality can be more comforting than illusion, shatters the myth that there are no atheists in foxholes — and tells how humanism got her through one of the grimmest times of her life. [Read more…]

My Interview with the “Secular Nation” Podcast!

atheist alliance of americaAre you a podcast listener? If so — check out my interview on the Secular Nation podcast! Secular Nation is the publishing arm of Atheist Alliance of America (they have a magazine as well as a podcast).

In this interview, we talk about some of the ideas in my new book, Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God. More specifically, we discuss questions such as: Is the religious view of death truly the most comforting view? How does atheists’ knowledge of death affect attitudes toward ourselves and others?

Comforting Thoughts book cover oblong 200 JPG

The Kindle edition of Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God is available on Amazon (that’s the link for Amazon US, btw — it’s available in other regions as well); the Nook edition is available at Barnes & Noble; and the Smashwords edition is available on Smashwords. All ebook editions and formats cost just $2.99. (The audiobook version is scheduled for publication on December 30; plans for a print edition are in the works.)

My Interview with Lindsay Beyerstein at “Point of Inquiry” Podcast!

point of inquiry logoPodcast fans — check out my interview on the Point of Inquiry podcast, with Lindsay Beyerstein! We talk about some of the ideas in my new book, Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God — the tendencies we have to avoid and deny death and how it affects our abilities to cope; how the concept of an afterlife may actually be failing to prepare people for the end of their lives; and how we can use our humanism and skepticism to find comfort in the midst of mortality and grief.

Comforting Thoughts book cover oblong 200 JPG

The Kindle edition of Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God is available on Amazon (that’s the link for Amazon US, btw — it’s available in other regions as well); the Nook edition is available at Barnes & Noble; and the Smashwords edition is available on Smashwords. All ebook editions and formats cost just $2.99. (The audiobook version is scheduled for publication on December 30; plans for a print edition are in the works.)

“Greta’s done a fantastic job”: Simon Davis on “Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God”

Comforting Thoughts book cover oblong 200 JPG“It’s not often that two of my favorite subjects — atheism and death — get written about in one book. Greta’s done a fantastic job of combining them. Death happens folks. It behooves us to ponder the matter and Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God is a great way to do that.”
-Simon Davis, “Post Mortem” columnist, VICE Magazine (@SimonKnowz)

Got a nice blurb about my new book, Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God (now available in ebook). Thanks, Simon!

The Kindle edition is available on Amazon (that’s the link for Amazon US, btw — it’s available in other regions as well); the Nook edition is available at Barnes & Noble; and the Smashwords edition is available on Smashwords. All ebook editions and formats cost just $2.99. (The audiobook version is scheduled for publication on December 30; plans for a print edition are in the works.)

Here’s the description of the book:

*

If you don’t believe in God or an afterlife — how do you cope with death?

Accepting death is never easy. But we don’t need religion to find peace, comfort, and solace in the face of death. In this mini-book collection of essays, prominent atheist author Greta Christina offers secular ways to handle your own mortality and the death of those you love.

Blending intensely personal experience with compassionate, down-to-earth wisdom, Christina (“Coming Out Atheist” and “Why Are You Atheists So Angry?”) explores a variety of natural philosophies of death. She shows how reality can be more comforting than illusion, shatters the myth that there are no atheists in foxholes — and tells how humanism got her through one of the grimmest times of her life. [Read more…]

Greta Live on “Atheists Talk” Radio, Sunday Dec. 21!

Comforting Thoughts book cover oblong 200 JPGI’m going to be live on Atheists Talk radio, Sunday December 21, at 9:00 am Central time. We’ll be talking about my new book, “Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing To Do With God,” and about atheist and humanist approaches to death and mortality.

Atheists Talk is produced by Minnesota Atheists. You can listen live in Minneapolis or thereabouts on AM 950 KTNF. The show is also streamed, so you can listen live online. You can call in to the studio with questions, 952-946-6205, or send an e-mail with questions to radio@mnatheists.org during the live show. The show will also be recorded for later podcast, if 9:00 am Central time on Sunday isn’t a good time for you.

Here’s what the Atheists Talk folks are saying about the show:

Whether we call ourselves atheists, agnostics, nonbelievers, freethinkers or none of the above, we have likely all given some thought to the consequences of our non-belief. One of those consequences is the way that we view the concept of death, and more specifically the knowledge that we will one day die, as will every living being in existence. It can be quite a daunting topic to think about. As we well know, there are many ways that human beings comfort and protect themselves against the idea of death, but many of them are focused on the idea of an afterlife, reincarnation or other supernatural ideas, which leaves nonbelievers and skeptics out in the proverbial cold.

Here to continue the conversation of how non-believers perceive the ideas and field the existential questions surrounding death and the meaning of a finite life is Greta Christina with her newly published book Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing To Do With God. Greta Christina tackles hard philosophical questions in a relaxed, conversational tone, and one cannot help but be…comforted…by the thoughts and ideas that she lays out.

Listen in, and give us a call! It’d be great to hear from you.

“It levels the playing field”: Sixo Kyu on “Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God”

In spite of my familiarity with Greta’s previous work, I still found myself concerned that this would be a book filled with wishy washy philosophies as to why death isn’t scary, but I was also secretly hoping that maybe it would have some sort of information that helps assuage the fear of death human beings experience…

…this book does neither of those things, and thankfully so! Because what it does do is even better. It levels the playing field when it comes to Theist VS Atheist ideas surrounding the topic of death.

Comforting Thoughts book cover oblong 200 JPGGot a nice, thoughtful review of my new book, Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God (now available in ebook), from Sixo Kyu on the Atheist Analyis blog. Here’s the full review. Thanks, Sixo!

The Kindle edition is available on Amazon (that’s the link for Amazon US, btw — it’s available in other regions as well); the Nook edition is available at Barnes & Noble; and the Smashwords edition is available on Smashwords. All ebook editions and formats cost just $2.99. (The audiobook version is scheduled for publication on December 30; plans for a print edition are in the works.)

Here’s the description of the book:

*

If you don’t believe in God or an afterlife — how do you cope with death?

Accepting death is never easy. But we don’t need religion to find peace, comfort, and solace in the face of death. In this mini-book collection of essays, prominent atheist author Greta Christina offers secular ways to handle your own mortality and the death of those you love.

Blending intensely personal experience with compassionate, down-to-earth wisdom, Christina (“Coming Out Atheist” and “Why Are You Atheists So Angry?”) explores a variety of natural philosophies of death. She shows how reality can be more comforting than illusion, shatters the myth that there are no atheists in foxholes — and tells how humanism got her through one of the grimmest times of her life. [Read more…]