Greta’s Secular Students Week Blogathon! Episode 2: What I Wanted To Be When I Grew Up

SSA Week logo

I’m doing a mini-blogathon today for Secular Students Week!

This week is Secular Students Week, when people around the Internet are celebrating the fantastic work the Secular Student Alliance is doing to empower students. Their goal is to get 500 donations now through June 17th: if they do, they’ll receive a $20,000 challenge grant! Help them keep up their amazing work by giving this week. A gift of $5, $10, or $20 will go a long way towards helping them reach this goal and empower secular students: please give today!

In today’s mini-blogathon, I’ll post a new blog post once an hour, from now (a little after 9:00 am Pacific time) until 5:00 pm Pacific time. In addition, for every donation that’s made today via my blogathon, I’ll post a new cat photo!

This hour’s blogathon post: When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

At various times in my childhood, I wanted to be: a brain surgeon (interesting, given my current interest in neurology and neuropsychology), a naturalist (a wildlife expert, not a person who only thinks the natural world exists), and the world’s first female football player. I didn’t even like football, or sports at all: I just wanted to be the first female something. I’m not sure why I picked football player. It seemed — pioneering, I guess.

I had a ballet outfit which I liked, and I took ballet classes (which I didn’t particularly like), but I don’t remember ever seriously wanting to be a ballerina.

I loved books, but I didn’t think about being a writer until I was in my twenties.

What did you want to be when you grew up?

Once again — please support the Secular Student Alliance! Help them get their challenge grant of $20,000 by reaching their goal of 500 donations now through June 17th. Even small donations help. Please support them today!


Comforting Thoughts book cover oblong 100 JPGComing Out Atheist Bendingwhy are you atheists so angryGreta Christina is author of four books: Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God, Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why, Why Are You Atheists So Angry? 99 Things That Piss Off the Godless, and Bending: Dirty Kinky Stories About Pain, Power, Religion, Unicorns, & More.

Greta’s Secular Students Week Blogathon! Episode 1: Thoughts About Realism in Fiction

SSA Week logo

I’m doing a mini-blogathon today for Secular Students Week!

This week is Secular Students Week, when people around the Internet are celebrating the fantastic work the Secular Student Alliance is doing to empower students. Their goal is to get 500 donations now through June 17th: if they do, they’ll receive a $20,000 challenge grant! Help them keep up their amazing work by giving this week. A gift of $5, $10, or $20 will go a long way towards helping them reach this goal and empower secular students: please give today!

In today’s mini-blogathon, I’ll post a new blog post once an hour, from now (a little after 9:00 am Pacific time) until 5:00 pm Pacific time. In addition, for every donation that’s made today via my blogathon, I’ll post a new cat photo!

This hour’s blogathon post: Thoughts About Realism in Fiction. I’m writing a novel, an erotic fiction novel, and I’m encountering an interesting conundrum. I want my novel to be realistic: I’m setting it in the real world, in real places, with real historical developments (the novel is set in the not-too-distant past, starting in 1970 and ending more or less now). I’m doing a lot of research to make the novel as realistic as possible: finding out how long it takes to get a graduate degree in library science, looking up which states had same-sex marriage when, digging up old editions of Our Bodies, Our Selves, that sort of thing.

But there’s a limiting factor here — and that’s the fact that the book is fiction, and is therefore, by definition, counter-factual. If I have a character work in a library at the University of Iowa (something I’m still deciding on, by the way) — well, there were a limited number of people working in the libraries at the University of Iowa, and my character wasn’t one of them. The very fact that I’m writing fiction set in the past means that I’m warping history, even if very gently.

So I’m having to decide: How much warping of history am I willing to do? Does it matter whether there really was a U-Haul office in Northampton, Massachusetts in 1989? Does it matter when the University of Michigan got a queer studies department, or indeed whether they have one at all? As long as these things are reasonably plausible, do they have to be true? What would it even mean for something to be plausible, but not true?

Would welcome thoughts on this.

Once again — please support the Secular Student Alliance! Help them get their challenge grant of $20,000 by reaching their goal of 500 donations now through June 17th. Even small donations help. Please support them today!


Comforting Thoughts book cover oblong 100 JPGComing Out Atheist Bendingwhy are you atheists so angryGreta Christina is author of four books: Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God, Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why, Why Are You Atheists So Angry? 99 Things That Piss Off the Godless, and Bending: Dirty Kinky Stories About Pain, Power, Religion, Unicorns, & More.

Pat Robertson: “That little baby could grow up to be Adolf Hitler”

(Content note: religious justification of the death of infants.)

Pat Robertson, on the 700 Club, on how to comfort grieving parents who ask, “Why did God allow my baby to die?”

As far as God’s concerned, he knows the end from the beginning and He sees a little baby and that little baby could grow up to be Adolf Hitler, he could grow up to be Joseph Stalin, he could grow up to be some serial killer, or he could grow up to die of a hideous disease. God sees all of that, and for that life to be terminated while he’s a baby, he’s going to be with God forever in Heaven so it isn’t a bad thing.

So let me get this straight. God lets babies die, because they might grow up to be Hitler. But he didn’t do that with — oh, let’s see if we can come up with a good example — ACTUAL FUCKING HITLER.

Seriously? This is what you tell grieving parents? God knows best? Your baby died because it might have grown up to be Hitler? So “it isn’t a bad thing”?

[vomits, sets everything on fire]


Comforting Thoughts book cover oblong 100 JPGComing Out Atheist Bendingwhy are you atheists so angryGreta Christina is author of four books: Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God, Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why, Why Are You Atheists So Angry? 99 Things That Piss Off the Godless, and Bending: Dirty Kinky Stories About Pain, Power, Religion, Unicorns, & More.

“It was through the Secular Student Alliance that I found a voice”: Guest Post by Rukia Brooks for SSA Week

SSA Week logo

This is a guest post by Rukia Brooks for SSA Week.

I did not have any intention of joining the Secular Student Alliance. I knew nothing about it, and I scoffed at the idea of secular activism. I didn’t really consider it to align with my progressive values, because I thought of secular activism as a means of looking down in a very condescending manner towards those who had the misfortune of being indoctrinated.

I came across the Secular Student Alliance while I was attending a meeting of progressive groups on campus while trying to be more involved with our Gay Student Alliance on campus. I didn’t have such a luxury at my High School, so it intrigued me as I was slowly coming out as a trans woman in my daily life. I felt it was a necessary resource to have, but sadly the Gay Student Alliance was not the most welcoming and seemed to ignore most of the needs of their trans student members. The hostess of the event was rather excited, and sported a t-shirt with the flying spaghetti monster on it. I shrugged, thinking nothing of it, but then she started talking to my roommate and me. Though she was a little loud, her excitement and joy were infectious. I really felt like she was probably the sweetest person ever, and soon introduced myself, albeit very nervously.

I started attending the Secular Student Alliance every Tuesday at seven PM, introducing myself as Zachary Bridges and feeling terrified of people. Everyone was really kind and a bit socially awkward. Kelley Freeman is an alumna of the University of South Carolina, and when I met her she was the president of the Secular Student Alliance. Kelley ran two major organizations at our school: Forward, the Progressive Student Alliance, and our Secular Student Alliance chapter. I came out to Kelley through Facebook because I felt at home with the Secular Student Alliance, even after such a short period of time. It wasn’t just a group of atheists talking about atheism, but a group of people who happened to be atheists talking about the world and how we can make it a better place. The SSA showed a love and understanding for humanity that truly inspired me to want to join the national organization and to start being more open about myself there.

It was through the Secular Student Alliance that I found a voice, had the chance to be myself, and found that a part of myself–my identity as an atheist, something I had kept secret due to fear of ridicule or bullying–could be used as a common ground to meet others who shared similar desires of a world free from ideology. It is through this organization that I have developed the majority of my friendships and found the courage to speak out as an atheist, a trans woman, a feminist, and other identities that I previously kept hidden about myself. I developed life-long friendships and learned how to discuss and engage in activism,, which I hadn’t realized I could do.

Being a part of the national organization has allowed me to engage in the national secular movement and in public speaking. The first opportunity I had to speak was through my own Secular Student Alliance chapter, where I spoke on trans identity and the Bible. I have since lead several talks on feminism,game development, secularism, and other topics. The Secular Student Alliance cares for students without trying to impose an ideology on them, but rather with a concern for their lives and values. I want to thank Lyz Liddell, Gordon Maples, Cara Zelaya, and Kelley Freeman for being absolutely amazing and wonderful.

I am telling you all of this because it is Secular Students Week, a time for us to highlight the amazing work students like me are able to do with the SSA’s help! In fact, if the SSA gets 500 donations now through June 17th, they will unlock a $20,000 challenge grant! A gift of $5, $10, or $20 will go a long way towards helping them reach this goal and empower secular students: give today!


Comforting Thoughts book cover oblong 100 JPGComing Out Atheist Bendingwhy are you atheists so angryGreta Christina is author of four books: Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God, Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why, Why Are You Atheists So Angry? 99 Things That Piss Off the Godless, and Bending: Dirty Kinky Stories About Pain, Power, Religion, Unicorns, & More.

“Highly Recommended for Everyone”: Amazon Customer Review of “Why Are You Atheists So Angry?”

I’ve gotten some nice Amazon customer reviews for Why Are You Atheists So Angry? 99 Things That Piss Off the Godless, and I thought I’d repost some of them. Here’s a good one, five stars out of five. (As of this writing, the book has 156 customer reviews, with an average rating of 4.4 out of 5 stars.) Here’s what David J. Couture “Stunned And Amazed – Dazed … had to say:

Highly Recommended for Everyone

If you’re looking for just a capsule review, here it is. I unequivocally recommend this book to everyone: believer, non-believer, questioner, or otherwise!

Ms. Christina presents her arguments carefully and logically in a very straightforward manner. She explains her positions so well, that I continually found myself thinking, “Yes! Exactly!” I felt like she was expressing ideas that I’ve had, and doing so exactly as I would LIKE to if I only had the eloquence and reasoning ability. If you are a believer in God, and are open to having a dialogue about your ideas and beliefs in a calm and eminently reasonable manner, you’ve found the right book!

To close out this brief review and give you a taste of what is in the book, here is her comment on the “6 Blind Men and an Elephant” story […]that progressive/moderate believers use to describe their idea that all believers believe in essentially the same thing and just differ in their interpretations. “Why do the six blind men just give up? Why don’t they compare notes and trade places and carefully examine the elephant to find out what it is? You know – the way we do in science.”

Excellent book – highly recommended.

Thanks, David! And if any of you have read Why Are You Atheists So Angry?, it’d be awesome if you’d post a review.

***

Here, by the way, is ordering info for the book in all three formats — print, ebook, and audiobook!

Why Are You Atheists So AngryEbook editions:
The Kindle edition is available at Amazon.
The Nook edition is available at Barnes & Noble.
Smashwords has the book in multiple formats, including iBooks, Sony Reader, Kobo, Kindle (.mobi), Stanza, Aldiko, Adobe Digital Editions, any other reader that takes the Epub format, Palm Doc (PDB), PDF, RTF, Online Reading via HTML, and Plain Text for either downloading or viewing.
All ebook editions and formats cost just $7.99.

Print edition:
The print edition is available at Powell’s Books.
The print edition is also available at Amazon. However, be advised (if you haven’t been already) that seriously abusive labor practices have been reported at Amazon warehouses. Please bear that in mind when you’re deciding where to buy my book — or indeed, where to buy anything. (For the record: Powell’s employees are unionized.) Again, that’s the link for Amazon US — it’s available in other regions as well.
The print edition is available at Last Gasp.
The print edition is $14.95 USD. It is published by Pitchstone Publishing.

Wholesale sales of the print edition:
Bookstores and other retailers can get the book from Ingram, Baker & Taylor, and other standard wholesale distributors. It can also be purchased directly from the publisher, Pitchstone Publishing.

Audiobook edition:
The audiobook version is available at Audible.
The audiobook version is available on iTunes.
The audiobook version is available on Amazon.
And yes, I did the recording for it!


Comforting Thoughts book cover oblong 100 JPGComing Out Atheist Bendingwhy are you atheists so angryGreta Christina is author of four books: Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God, Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why, Why Are You Atheists So Angry? 99 Things That Piss Off the Godless, and Bending: Dirty Kinky Stories About Pain, Power, Religion, Unicorns, & More.

The Karen Stollznow/ Ben Radford/ Hemant Mehta Thing

So as some of you may already know, Ben Radford issued a statement on May 22, cosigned by Karen Stollznow, stating:

In 2013 Karen Stollznow accused Ben Radford of stalking, sexual harassment, and both physical and sexual assault. She made these accusations in a complaint to Bed Radford’s employer (the Center for Inquiry), in a guest blog written for the Scientific American Mind website, and to various individuals in private communication.

Karen and Ben were in an intimate, personal relationship that ended with acrimony and misunderstandings. But it would be wrong for anyone to believe that Ben Radford stalked, sexually harassed, or physically and sexually assaulted Karen Stollznow.

The issue has done damage to both Karen and Ben and to their careers. Through mutual discussion, all issues between them have now been resolved. Both Ben and Karen wish to move on with their lives and put this matter behind them.

They ask that their friends and colleagues let the matter drop. They ask that bloggers and others who have repeated these allegations against Radford or Stollznow remove them from their sites and not repeat them. Any blogs or other published references to these accusations only serve to perpetuate the harm to both parties.

Hemant Mehta wrote about this on June 2 — strongly insinuating that several bloggers (including me) who had shown support for Stollznow knew about this statement, and were deliberately sitting on it and staying silent about it. As it happens, I didn’t know about the statement until the Mehta’s piece went up on June 2 — and that’s true for several of the other bloggers cited by Mehta. (I don’t know about all of them.) He has posted an update at the end of the piece with a semi-apology to me about this implication, but to my knowledge has not apologized to any of the other bloggers he implicated.

I may write more later about Mehta’s piece and its insinuations. For now, I’m simply going to comment on the statement itself:

I am highly skeptical, to say the least, of the content of this statement. Among other reasons: In the past, Radford has written “joint” statements of this nature and tried to pressure Stollznow into signing them. At least some of the accusations of harassment were corroborated by others. CFI hired an investigative firm, which found merit to at least some of Stollznow’s accusations. And if this report is correct, Stollznow signed the May 22 statement under extreme pressure, including a demand that she sign on the day that she went into induced labor. It’s only one report, not yet corroborated, so I don’t know if it’s true — but it’s certainly consistent with Radford’s previous pattern. So I am highly skeptical, to say the least, of the content of this statement. But I will take one part of it at face value: The statement asks colleagues to let the matter drop. So unless something happens in the future that makes further comment on this important and relevant, I’m dropping it.

For that reason (and also because I’m recovering from being very sick, and don’t have the energy to moderate comments on this), I’m closing comments on this post. If you want to discuss this issue, you can do so elsewhere. Here are a few other comments on this issue and replies to Mehta’s post, from PZ Myers, Stephanie Zvan, Jason Thibeault, and Rebecca Watson.

Support Secular Activist Taslima Nasrin, Targeted for Murder by Al Qaeda-Linked Extremists

Taslima-NasrinWorld-renowned secular activist and author Taslima Nasrin has been threatened with death — by the same violent extremists who claimed responsibility for the recent murders of freethought writers Avijit Roy, Washiqur Rahman, and Ananta Bijoy Das. Her advocacy of human rights and criticism of religion forced her into exile from her native Bangladesh in 1994: since 2004 she has lived in India, but even there she has faced persecution and threats — threats that have become much more alarming and immediate. She has come to the United States for her safety: she arrived just last week.

But her safety is only temporary if she can’t stay here. Center for Inquiry has established a Freethought Emergency Fund to help with food, housing, and the means for Dr. Nasrin to be safely settled.

CFI has also heard from several other secular writers and activists in Bangladesh who are in similarly perilous situations — many of whom have also been specifically named as targets for murder. If more money is raised than Dr. Nasrin needs, it will go to a general freethought emergency fund, to assist with the rescue of other atheist, humanist, and secular activists under threat. Please donate if you can — even small amounts help, they really do add up. And please spread the word on Twitter, Facebook, other social media, and any other platform you have. Thanks.


Comforting Thoughts book cover oblong 100 JPGComing Out Atheist Bendingwhy are you atheists so angryGreta Christina is author of four books: Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God, Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why, Why Are You Atheists So Angry? 99 Things That Piss Off the Godless, and Bending: Dirty Kinky Stories About Pain, Power, Religion, Unicorns, & More.

“There Is No Atheist Movement”: Why I’m Officially Done With Dictionary Atheism

“There is no atheist movement.” “Atheism isn’t a movement.” “Look at the definition — all ‘atheist’ means is ‘person who doesn’t believe in any gods’! We don’t have anything else in common! How can you build a movement around that?”

When I write about organized atheism, I get this response a fair amount. I saw it most recently on Twitter, where @davidgaliel wrote, “I think ‘atheist movement’ is about as meaningful as ‘non-chess-player movement’ — but I’m mentioning that particular instance just to give an example, not to single it out. I see this idea a lot. I used to argue with it. I am done arguing with it. Whenever I see it in the future, I’m just going to link to this piece.

Let’s make an analogy. Let’s talk about the gay rights movement.*

LGBT pride flagTechnically, the only thing gay men and lesbians and bisexuals all have in common is that we’re attracted to people of the same gender. And yet, we’ve built a movement. We’ve built organizations that push back against the discrimination and bigotry we all share. We’ve built organizations to amplify our voices, knowing that these are all too easily drowned out. We’ve built organizations to preserve our history, knowing that this is all too easily destroyed and lost. We’ve built organizations to educate straight people about who we are, and to counter the myths and fears and misinformation about us. We’ve built networks to educate each other: about job discrimination laws, about anti-gay violence, about coming-out techniques, about safer sex, about hundreds of other issues that affect us. We’ve built support structures and supportive communities to replace the ones that we’d lost. Etc., etc., etc. — I could go on for a whole lot longer.

No, not every one of these issue concerns every single one of us. But enough of them affect enough of us that we’ve been able to organize. No, we don’t all agree on the best way to reach our goals, or even what our goals should be. Having a movement doesn’t mean marching in lockstep. It doesn’t mean every single one of us agrees on every single thing, or indeed on anything at all (other than “people of the same gender sure are hot!”). It means enough of us agree about enough things, enough of us share enough of the same goals, enough of us share enough common experiences — so we’ve been able to organize.

Technically, the only thing gay men and lesbians and bisexuals all have in common is that we’re attracted to people of the same gender. And if we’d decided that we couldn’t build a movement around that, we’d be in the crapper. Forget about same-sex marriage and employment non-discrimination — we’d still be getting put in mental hospitals, getting our bars shut down by the police, getting arrested for just looking too gay. We haven’t just built a movement — we’ve built an extremely powerful movement, one that radically improved our lives and has had a significant impact on society at large.

Now. Translate, please, to atheists.

Is there any reason LGB people can organize, but atheists can’t? Is there some reason that “same-gender attraction” can be an effective locus for community and political organizing — but “not believing in gods” can’t be?

Foundation Beyond Belief logoYes, Virginia, there is an atheist movement. It’s a flatly ridiculous denial of reality to say that there isn’t one, or that there can’t be one. There’s the Foundation Beyond Belief. The Secular Student Alliance. The American Humanist Association. The Freedom From Religion Foundation. American Atheists. Atheist Alliance International. Black Non-Believers. Hispanic American Freethinkers. Secular Woman. The United Coalition of Reason. Council of Ex-Muslims of Britain. Ex-Muslims of North America. Grief Beyond Belief. Recovering From Religion. Filipino Freethinkers. Sunday Assembly. Atheist Foundation of Australia. Kasese United Humanist Association. Pakistani Atheists and Agnostics. The Secular Therapist Project. The Clergy Project. Godless Perverts. The Center for Inquiry. The many local chapters of Center for Inquiry. 1,075 (as of this writing) atheist groups on Meetup. Many many many many more. And none of that includes atheist organizing and community-building online: Atheist Nexus, ExChristian.net, Skepchick, the Patheos Atheist channel, Freethought Blogs, many many more.

If you want to see a much longer but by no means comprehensive list, with links and everything, take a look at the Resource Guide from my book Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why (I’ve posted it online). Plus there are national conferences, international conferences, regional conferences, backchannel discussion groups, informal networks of colleagues and friends — all so that the people in these organizations and networks and groups can talk together: to strategize, to share information and experience, to commiserate, to celebrate, to offer and give support, to just enjoy each others’ company.

What the heck is all that if not an atheist movement? [Read more…]

#mencallmethings: “fat ass,” “bitch,” “rot in hell”

Content note: misogynist, homophobic, ableist, sizeist harassment

Asshole in email (no, Im not going to name him), replying to my recent essay on AlterNet, 7 Things People Who Say They’re ‘Fiscally Conservative But Socially Liberal’ Don’t Understand:

How the hell are you qualified to write ANYTHING about conservatives? You should pull your head out of your fat ass before touching a keyboard. Conservatives that support the removal of the gay marriage restrictions do so only because the government should not discriminate against any group, no matter how deviant. Since homosexuality is merely a “behavior” (show me the gay gene that doesn’t exist, therefore your are NOT born that way as you libtards like to claim – of course without any scientific proof as usual). But many consrvatives are syill willing to change all the rules for a “behavior”. You make me sick. Not surprised you don’t believe in God – you libtards are way too smart for that. So I am encouraged to know you will rot in hell. Hope that day comes soon and is full of suffering for you and your entire famly bitch

#mencallmethings

Note 1: Yes, this is definitely going to make me re-think my position on fiscal conservatism. I hadn’t considered the possibility that I might be a fat-ass deviant libtard bitch who will rot in hell, and that therefore conservative fiscal policy might be more sound than I’d previously thought. /sarcasm

Note 2: Re “I am encouraged to know you will rot in hell. Hope that day comes soon and is full of suffering for you and your entire famly”: Why, precisely, should my entire family suffer because I’m queer and/or an atheist?

Note 3: It’s interesting to note that I actually said very, very little in this piece about homosexuality, and nothing at all about same-sex marriage. The piece was mostly about poverty and race. It’s interesting how people with passionate hatred will zero in on the object of their hatred, even when it’s entirely tangential.

[Read more…]

Godless Perverts Social Club, Thursday May 21!

godless perverts social club may 21 2015

The next Godless Perverts Social Club is Thursday, May 21! This is one of our Casual meetups — we’re not picking a topic ahead of time, we’ll just chat about whatever comes up. Usually related to sex, sexuality, gender, atheism, religion, skepticism, science, etc. — but not always.

The Godless Perverts Social Club meets on the first Tuesday and the third Thursday of every month, 7-9 pm, at Wicked Grounds, 289 8th Street at Folsom in San Francisco (near Civic Center BART). Admission is free, but we ask that you buy food and/or drink at the cafe if you can: they have beverages, light snacks, full meals, and milkshakes made of literal awesome sauce.

Godless Perverts presents and promotes a positive view of sexuality without religion, by and for sex-positive atheists, agnostics, humanists, and other non-believers, through performance events, panel discussions, social gatherings, media productions, and other appropriate outlets. Our events and media productions present depictions, explorations, and celebrations of godless sexualities — including positive, traumatic, and complex experiences — focusing on the intersections of sexuality with atheism, materialism, skepticism, and science, as well as critical, questioning, mocking, or blasphemous views of sex and religion.

Godless Perverts is committed to feminism, diversity, inclusivity, and social justice. We seek to create safe and welcoming environments for all non-believers and believing allies who are respectful of the mission, and are committed to taking positive action to achieve this. Please let the moderators or other people in charge of any event know if you encounter harassment, racism, misogyny, transphobia, or other problems at our events.

If you want to be notified about all our Godless Perverts events, sign up for our email mailing list, or follow us on Twitter at @GodlessPerverts. You can also sign up for the Bay Area Atheists/ Agnostics/ Humanists/ Freethinkers/ Skeptics Meetup page, and be notified of all sorts of godless Bay Area events — including the Godless Perverts. And of course, you can always visit our Website to find out what we’re up to, godlessperverts.com. Hope to see you soon!


Comforting Thoughts book cover oblong 100 JPGComing Out Atheist Bendingwhy are you atheists so angryGreta Christina is author of four books: Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God, Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why, Why Are You Atheists So Angry? 99 Things That Piss Off the Godless, and Bending: Dirty Kinky Stories About Pain, Power, Religion, Unicorns, & More.