Quantcast

«

»

Nov 06 2012

Decisions Are Made By Those Who Show Up: Why Voting and Calling Congress Isn’t a Waste of Time

your vote counts buttonWhen I first wrote this piece a few years ago, I wrote it specifically to encourage people to call or email their Congresspeople or other elected representatives. But it applies just as well to voting. So I’m recycling it here today. I’m concerned that progressives in the U.S. may not turn out very heavily in tomorrow’s election, since a lot of progressives are very disillusioned with politics and government right now. I don’t care. Vote anyway. This piece talks about why. Just replace “calling Congress” with “voting.”

Okay. The title is a bit off. A more accurate title would be, “Why Calling Or Emailing Congress, The President, And Your Other Elected Officials Not Only Isn’t A Waste Of Time, But Is One Of The Most Important Things We Can Do To Take Back Our Supposedly Democratically Elected Government.” But the Writer’s Union would have my head if I went with a title like that…

cel phoneI’m writing today to ask you to write and/or email your Senator, your Congressperson, your President. Your governor. Your mayor. Your city council. Your school board. If you don’t live in the U.S.: Your Prime Minister, your Premiere, your MP, your Assemblymember, your Deputy, whatever.

Not on any particular issue. Just in general. On whatever issue you care about.

And I want to argue that this is not a waste of time. I want to argue that this is one of the single most effective political actions we can take: not just to change this policy or that policy, but to change the entire way our government works, and the amount of power we have in it.

When I wrote my recent piece exhorting readers to call/ email Congress and the President about the public option for health care, many of you followed through, with a heartening degree of enthusiasm. But a surprising number of politically aware, politically astute people were strongly resistant: not to the public option for health care, but to the very idea of contacting their elected officials at all. They thought their voices wouldn’t be heard or cared about. They thought it was a waste of time.

I want to persuade you that it is not a waste of time.

And I want to persuade myself as well. I don’t call or email my representatives nearly as much as I think I should, and I’m writing this partly to remind myself to do it more.

Here is my thesis.

empty voting boothsThe fact that Americans feel so alienated from our government? The fact that so many people don’t vote? The fact that most people don’t call or email the President or their Congresspeople to tell them how they feel about important issues? The fact that so many people think politicians don’t care about them anyway, so there’s no reason they should bother getting involved?

This plays directly into the hands of the very people we don’t want running the show.

This is one of the main reasons government is so much more responsive to hard-line extremists and big-money corporate interests than it is to the majority of people it’s representing.

This is one of the main reasons government is so screwed up.

When very few people get involved in politics — when very few people even bother to vote, and even fewer bother to call or email their elected representatives — then the few people who do bother are the ones who get listened to. The hard-line crazies get to set the terms of the debate. Them, and the people with money.

baptizing of americaWhy do you think the extreme religious right was so successful, for so long, in setting this country’s political agenda? They were successful, in large part, because they had an extraordinarily well-oiled machine of millions of inspired people who would make phone calls and write letters at the drop of a hat. When the folks on the mailing lists of the religious right got a call for action telling them to call or write their Congressperson, they didn’t lapse into cynicism about how no politician really cares about them — and they didn’t lapse into soul-searching about whether they were sufficiently educated on this issue to express their opinion. They bloody well picked up the phone and called.

Decisions are made by those who show up.

And if we want to be making the decisions, we have to show up.

There’s a larger, more systemic way that this plays out, too. The fact that people feel jaded and alienated by politics and government? It’s a textbook example of a vicious circle. The less that people get involved in their government, the less politicians have to worry about the voters — and the more they can suck up to big money contributors. And the more that politicians suck up to big money contributors, the more alienated and jaded people get about government… and the less likely they are to get involved.

figures moving computer mouseThis circle isn’t going to get broken by elected officials. And it sure as hell isn’t going to get broken by corporate interests. The only way it’s going to get broken is by citizens picking up their phones or getting on their computers and telling their elected officials, “If you want my vote ever again, you freaking well better vote for X.” And then Y. And then Z. Over, and over, and over again. The only people who can break this circle are you and me.

Not getting involved doesn’t make government better. It makes government worse. It plays right into the hands of the corporate interests, who find it easier to get laws written their way when there aren’t all those pesky citizens to worry about.

And it plays right into the right-wing “keep government small and taxes low” rhetoric — otherwise translated as, “Keep taxes on rich people and big corporations low; keep regulations on business to a bare minimum if that; and keep government services for poor and middle- class people stripped to the bone.” People’s cynicism about government, their belief that it never helps them and doesn’t have anything to do with them unless it’s screwing them over, and it’s always better to have it small and weak since it sucks so badly? That’s one of the strongest cards in the right wing’s hand.

firefightersI’ve written about this before, and I’ll write it again: Government is — in theory, and at least some of the time in practice — the way a society pools some of its resources, to provide itself with structures and services that make that society function smoothly and that promote the common good. And it’s the way a society decides how those pooled resources should be used. It’s one of the main ways that a society shares, cooperates, works together, takes care of each other — all those great ideals we learned in kindergarten. Government is roads, parks, fire departments, street sweepers, public health educators, emergency services, sewers, schools. Government is not Them. Government — democratic government, anyway — is Us.

But for government to do all this and be all this, not just in theory but in practice, we need to start seeing government as Us.

control keyAnd calling/ emailing your President, your Senators, your Congressperson, your governor and your mayor and your dogcatcher, is one of the most powerful things we can do to turn government from Them into Us. It reminds our elected officials that they work for Us, that they’re there to represent Us. And maybe just as importantly, it reminds us of that, too.

If you want to look at it idealistically: Many elected officials get into politics because they want to make a difference, and want to represent the will of their voters. And those officials are desperately wishing for citizens to kick up a stink on important issues: it makes it easier for them to fight special interests, and it lets them know that we’ve got their back. (It’s a whole lot easier to tell your big campaign contributors, “No,” when you can say, “I’m really sorry, but my phone is ringing off the hook about this one, and if I don’t support/ oppose it my voters will have my head.”)

But you can also see this in a completely venal, Machiavellian view… and still come to the same conclusion. Squeaky wheels. Grease. Many elected officials don’t much care about making a difference… but they bloody well care about getting re-elected. Politicians assume that if people care enough about an issue to call or write about it, they’ll care enough to vote the bums out on election day. If enough people call or write, it can override the voice of big- money special interests — even for the most self-serving politician in the world.

pigs at the trough book coverI get that it’s easy to be cynical about politics. Boy, howdy, do I get it. You don’t have to tell me about the massive role that big money and corporate lobbying plays in government and policy; or about the short attention span of citizens and how easily distracted they can be by the Drama of the Day; or about the great advantage incumbents have over challengers and how it contributes to inertia and indifference in politicians; or about how easy it is for voters to be manipulated by fear. I am 47 years old, and I’ve been participating in my government for almost three decades and observing it for longer than that, and I am under no illusions about how deeply sucky government can be. I get it.

But I also think that cynicism is the easy way out. Cynicism is just a way of not having to care, so you don’t risk being disappointed. Not calling or emailing an elected official, because you think they don’t care and won’t listen, is like never asking out the girl or guy you think is really cute, because you’re afraid they’ll say no. It’s giving up before you’ve even started.

I keep thinking about that quote from Voltaire: “The perfect is the enemy of the good.” Politics is never, ever, ever perfect. Politics is the art of compromise… and the art of compromise is often an ugly, messy, dumb art.

But giving up is not the answer. Giving up is not going to make government better. Giving up is actively making it worse. Giving up on government because we can’t make it perfect is the enemy of making it good. Or at least, making it better.

And better is… well, better. As my friend Nosmo King points out: The lesser of two evils is less evil. How is that a hard decision?

This isn’t idealism. It’s harm reduction.

cynicism from diogenes to dilbert book coverStay cynical if you want to. Keep being a jaded, cynical hard-ass who thinks all government officials are selfish, power-hungry jerks. But be a jaded, cynical hard-ass who thinks all government officials are selfish, power-hungry jerks… and who calls or emails them to tell them what jerks they’re being, and what exactly you expect them to do to be marginally less jerky.

Be a jaded, cynical hard-ass. But don’t be a nihilist. Don’t give up. People fought and died for the idea of participatory democracy: not just in the United States, but all over the world. In many parts of the world, they’re still fighting and dying for it. You’re lucky. You don’t have to fight and die to keep this idea alive. You just have to call or email your elected officials. And you just have to vote.

So that’s the general principle. Participatory democracy. You know, the principle that this country fought a revolution for.

And yet a lot of people who agree with the principle still don’t follow through in practice. A lot of people who passionately support the idea of participatory democracy still don’t pick up the phone or get on the computer to, you know, participate in it. (Including me a lot of the time.)

Why is that?

I posted this question on Facebook the other day. I asked, “If someone asks you to email your Congressperson, and you don’t, even if you care about the issue — what stops you?”

I wasn’t asking to judge or criticize. Hell, I do this, too. I decide that I’m too tired, too busy, that if I responded to every “Call your Congressperson” email I got I’d never get anything else done. But it does bug me. It’s such a simple thing to do, and it can make such a huge difference, and I’m trying to figure out what, specifically, keeps us from doing it.

So now — again, for my own benefit as much as anybody else’s — I want to respond to some of the answers I got to this question. I want to remind myself, and anyone else reading this, that the reasons for not calling or emailing your elected officials, as understandable as they may be, simply aren’t anywhere near as compelling as the reasons for calling and emailing.

(Here’s Part 2 of the original.) Again, it talks more about calling elected officials than it does about voting… but I think it’s still relevant.

7 comments

2 pings

Skip to comment form

  1. 1
    mildlymagnificent

    Speaking from across the Pacific, the thing that really gets up my nose is this “pledge” that Norquist extracts from people. These people are elected, elected. to. represent. their. constituents. This arm-twisting them to act in one particular way – regardless of how it affects the people who elected them, regardless of how things in their electorate might change – is completely undemocratic.

    Everyone who finds themselves with a person representing them who seems likely to submit to this backroom pressure should apply some democratic pressure to put voters needs first.

  2. 2
    hexidecima

    the only time that voting would be totally useless is if all candidates were exactly the same. They aren’t, especially in the US presidential race and even if it is a choice between the lesser of two evils, it *is* at least that much of a benefit. To whine and say that, because you didn’t get your way or you didn’t get things done fast enough for you, you won’t vote is pretty damn pathetic.

  3. 3
    priscillatroop

    I don’t know if all representatives do this but my congressmen, Larry Kissell actually sends out a ‘weekly column’ via email. It basically informs his constituents of local and state issues that are on his agenda. I’ve received several replies to my emails about issues though most of the time my Rep. doesn’t side with me (shrugs.) I don’t vote (except on issues) because I don’t subscribe to the concept of representation but I do my best to get involved with local issues which there aren’t many of because I live in the country which is nice. I do attend City Counsil Meetings in the city once a month or if I read something in the local paper that is of concern. Voting seems like such a superficial way to get involved and for many it gives them a false sense of inclusion. I like that you addressed both people who do vote for candidates and feel they’ve done their ‘duty’ and then never get involved with local and state Reps. or issues and also urged those of us who are disillusioned with the process to reconsider voting. Anyway, I really enjoyed reading this.

  4. 4
    Bronze Dog

    I’m pretty cynical these days, but you’re pretty much right about the need for these kinds of actions. It’s easy to get discouraged when you get mindless buzzwords in a reply, like I did when I sent out an email to one of my congressmen about marriage equality. I sent in my disgust and that was the end of that exchange.

  5. 5
    godlesspanther

    Greta, you came up on a discussion group — the question is — would you be willing to run for POTUS in 2016?

  6. 6
    jamesheartney

    Calling politicians’ offices can be effective, to the extent you’re dealing with an issue within that politicians’ possible range of response. By this I mean that the politician should not have already defined themselves as having a position against what you are asking them to do. Calling Senator DeMint’s office to speak in favor of marriage equality won’t have any possible effect; he’s already written you off, and in fact his reelection prospects depend on his demonizing you and yours to his troglodyte base.

    Voting is also extremely important, and not just in the presidential years. The 2010 right-wing tsunami happened because too many of the progressives who helped create the Democratic waves of 2006 and 2008 stayed home. Thus the Republicans were in place to control redistricting in too many places, which is part of why we still have a Republican House despite the fact that Dems won the overall vote for congressional offices in 2012.

    Volunteering in elections is also an effective way to promote your favored point of view. The masses of volunteers that flooded Ohio this year helped deny the state to Romney, and thus denied the Xtian right their man in the White House. See here for an inspiring story of people-powered democracy in action this year.

    Emailing is much easier than calling, voting or volunteering, and it’s also correspondingly weaker as an action. One phone call is probably worth 50 or more emails. If you care about the issue, take the time to call; the force multiplier is so much higher that the email is hardly worth bothering with.

  7. 7
    Jerry

    I don’t think you made the best case for why a cynic should write to a representative, especially a rep of the polar opposite beliefs. I wrote pretty often to my former far right wing Tea Bagger representative because I wanted to piss him off. I usually*sent politely worded letters full of facts, of course, but that was just a smoke screen.
    * Okay, a couple of times I called him an idiot, and in one of those letters I asked the staff member reading the letter why he or she was working for an idiot. Oddly enough, I didn’t get a reply to that note. But that was the exception.

  1. 8
    Around FtB | Pharyngula

    [...] Greta Christina explains why voting isn’t a waste of time. [...]

  2. 9
    Participating in democracy | Cognitive Revolution

    [...] far so cynical. But something Greta Christina posted this morning made me perk up and feel a little more empowered: I’m writing today to ask you to [...]

Leave a Reply