“Without Their Silence, Their Ignorance, Their Shrugging Shoulders, This Situation Could Not Continue As It Is” »« New at Rosetta Stones: New Images of Mount St. Helens!

Cryptopod: Wee Green Wriggly

There’s a mostly-empty parking lot next door to ye olde day job place, where B & I take a quick walk on breaks sometimes. You’d think parking lots would be rather stark and boring to walk through, but this is a richly-landscaped one, and so there are pretty trees and bushes and things. Sometimes there are wee little living things, like this very tiny caterpillar who was absolutely determined to cross that blacktop desert and reach the insect equivalent of Utopia.

Image shows a tiny green caterpillar on asphalt.

Cryptopod I

Alas, rapid movement and twilight aren’t great for photography, but we had a merry old time watching the little green bugger wriggle its way toward luscious, lovely leaves.

Image shows a tiny green caterpillar on asphalt.

Cryptopod II

So shiny and green! I remember ‘pillars much like this one from my childhood in Arizona. Watching them navigate the leaves and stems on their chosen weed, coaxing them to crawl round on me hand, trying to figure out how they function… they provided hours of entertainment. Shame about what they did to my mother’s tomato plants.

Ah, well. Not being a gardener, I can still take some childish pleasure in ‘em. Hopefully most of you can, too!

Comments

  1. says

    Damn! Now I’ve got

    “…Inchworm, inchworm
    Measuring the marigold
    You and your arithmatic
    You’ll probably go far… ”

    Going through my head. :-)

  2. moarscienceplz says

    Yep. Out in the wild, caterpillars are cute and fun. but if I find one in my garden I will kill it with wrathful death!

  3. Trebuchet says

    Speaking of creepy-crawlies, we’re having a mild outbreak of tent caterpillars on the Olympic Peninsula. They’re highly cyclical. At least it’s not like 20 or so years ago when many trees were covered with webbing instead of leaves and the trunks were crawling with orange.

    I had to laugh later that year when a radio DJ was complaining about all the little brown moths and wondering where they came from.