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New at Rosetta Stones: Beach Mysteries

Our very own Onamission5 gave me the opening I needed to post pictures I took recently illustrating a particularly interesting (to me, at least) source of beach cobbles. Hope you enjoy!

For those wondering why one of those photos looks so wonky, it’s a crop of this one:

Driftwood log and the sea sloshing over the cobbly shore at Lincoln Park, Puget Sound.

Driftwood log and the sea sloshing over the cobbly shore at Lincoln Park, Puget Sound.

Bluffs begin next week – I’ve nearly got the first post written, and the series is mapped out, with all of the research just about done. I’d have had it done tonight, only I discovered a whole new aspect I wanted to add to the overview post, because it’s unique to Puget Sound and therefore awesome. I’m fairly excited about the bluffs. I’ve found lots of excellent info, I’ve got a crap-ton of delicious photos, and we’ll run in to three USGS geologists working on the glacial history of Puget Sound (including Discovery Park) who ended up at Mount St. Helens in May 1980. Loving it!

Comments

  1. rq says

    I don’t have to drag myself to a beach. I just need to drag myself to the nearest camera-fixing shop and get the camera fixed so I can take photos of all the beach rocks I’ve already dragged home. :)
    Can’t wait for the bluffs!

  2. Trebuchet says

    Ow, my arm! I’ve overextended it patting myself on the back when I re-read Onamission5’s post and thought “brick”.

    When my wife was doing craft projects with shells a few years ago, we spent quite a bit of time beachcombing. Quite an amazing amount of water-modified human detritus around — bricks, glass, ceramics, even metallic. And plastics, of course. I tried to make a point of having a bag to collect the plastics I found and take them to the trash.

    Along with rq, looking forward to the bluffs.