New at Rosetta Stones: How to Cook a PNW Tree


At last, my darlings, I have finished! Our trees are fully cooked, piping-hot out of the oven and waiting for you to savor. Yum!

While you’re here, a couple of outtakes (i.e., photos I didn’t have enough room for):

 Aerial view of seared zone south of Camp Baker after May 18 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Cowlitz County, Washington. May 22, 1980. Image courtesy USGS.

Aerial view of seared zone south of Camp Baker after May 18 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Cowlitz County, Washington. May 22, 1980. Image courtesy USGS.

I didn’t use this one in the main post, because it’s not as obvious, but if you look closely within the scorched zone, you’ll notice how abrupt the transition from burnt to unburnt is. The hot cloud just went woosh up into the air, and while one tree perished, its neighbor was spared. Pretty wild stuff.

Speaking of wild, this was a common scene round my childhood city:

Panorama of the Schultz Fire, Flagstaff, AZ. Image courtesy Calvin Johnson, Leupp, Arizona and Coconino National Forest.

Panorama of the Schultz Fire, Flagstaff, AZ. Image courtesy Calvin Johnson, Leupp, Arizona and Coconino National Forest.

No, the San Francisco Peaks weren’t erupting. Nor was any other volcano. Some stupid bugger didn’t know how to handle a campfire in dry country, and next thing you know, half the mountain’s on fire. It burned Schultz Peak all the way up. My darlings, when Smokey the Bear tells you to be careful with fire in the forest, please be fucking careful with fire in the forest, m’kay?

Thank you. Now, get thee to the baked trees, and let me know how they turned out.

Comments

  1. rq says

    All you need is a volcano. Pfft! It’s really that simple? Ha.
    Excellent post, as always. I like my Mount St Helens’ updates.