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New at Rosetta Stones: We Have Successfully Delivered a Bouncing Baby Cinder Cone

The second (and for now, last) installment of the birth of Parícutin is now up at Rosetta Stones. I’d like to say something profound and deep about it, but it was an eventful delivery, and I’m tuckered. I shall rely upon you, my darlings, to say the appropriate words in comments if the spirit moves you. “Holy fucking shit, Batman!” is also acceptable. It’s not every day a volcano is born in a cornfield, after all.

If anyone knows the fancy code for enlarging the font size in captions, I’ll go back and do that. I’ve not been able to figure it out, and I know some in the audience would like to stop squinting, so hopefully one of you knows the secret.

 

Taken from the northeast. Parlcutin Volcano. Michoacan, Mexico. February 21, 1943. (Photo by S. Ceja) Published as plate 17-A in U. S. Geological Survey. Bulletin 965-D. 1956. Image and caption courtesy USGS.

The new cone, about 30 meters high, appears above the treetops. Taken from the northeast. Parlcutin Volcano. Michoacan, Mexico. February 21, 1943. (Photo by S. Ceja) Published as plate 17-A in U. S. Geological Survey. Bulletin 965-D. 1956. Image and caption courtesy USGS.

Comments

  1. rq the kutalikleptomanic says

    I believe you’re in cahoots with the translating company I free-lance for. They send me work, you put up new things on Rosetta Stones. Is this a test of my mettle and concentration? If so, you’re winning. (Yes, I’m off to read the post and exclaim a few Holy ficking shit, Batman!s along the way.)

    • rq the kutalikleptomanic says

      Excellent, as always. I think the phrase “confused cake” is the most eloquent volcanic description I’ve heard in a while!

      • rq says

        I guess changing my display ‘nym does the whole into-moderation thing, too… Eh, well, I was only being full of compliments (direct and indirect), as per the usual. :)

        • Dana Hunter says

          Silly WordPress. Ah, well, it should know both names now. Thanks for the love! Sorry about distracting you from work… sorta. :-P

  2. Trebuchet says

    You’ve once again given me goose bumps. Awesome and terrifying at the same time.

    Regarding the font size: Thanks for looking into it. I didn’t have much trouble reading the captions in the RS post today but the one in this post is more problematic. The difference is that there’s a gray background in this one. Contrast makes a big difference!

  3. movablebooklady says

    Very nice, as usual. And, you got a nice call-out on Boing Boing today with a link for both parts. Yay!

  4. says

    As I was reading the build-up to the eruption, I thought about how I’d react to hearing and feeling magma moving thunderously not very far under the ground… I wouldn’t want to stay there (not that they knew what it was, though). It makes the ground seem so fragile, as a skin on top of all that heat and power.

  5. says

    Hi Dana,

    I usually find it’s usually okay to enclose your caption in a span, and then muck around with the font-size variable until it looks okay – it’s easiest to start off at the default size of 100%, see what that looks like, and increase/decrease it as you see fit. (And test it on a mobile device or a different browser or two, once you’ve think you’ve got the right size.)

    <span style="font-size:100%;"> Your caption goes here </span>

    I’m really enjoying the short series on Parícutin amidst the longer-running Cataclysm posts over at SciAm; I read about Parícutin when I was a child, and remember thinking how terrifying it must have been for Señor Pulido to find the cinder cone erupting in his corn fields and growing so quickly, and your writing is vividly bringing that back to life. Thanks again!