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Unidentified Flying Dinosaur: Batman Among the Blueberries

My supervisor, Shelli, is teh awesome, and has sent me one of the greatest UFDs of all time. Check this birdie out:

Mystery Bird I

She says he just sat there while she crept up with her cell phone in hand, tilting his head this way and that, completely without fear. I think he was mesmerized by the horns on her phone’s case. Besides, it’s blue. Maybe he thought it was an enormous rectangular blueberry.

Mystery Bird II

He looks like a fledgeling of some sort. Hopefully, your bird-fu is good enough to identify even teh bebbies. If it helps, this photo was taken sometime around late July-early August. And, obviously, it was at a blueberry farm. Bryant Blueberry Farm in Arlington, Washington, in fact. Shelli goes there every summer, because, she says, “they keep them really well tended. I’ve been to lesser blueberry farms, and they only make me keep going there [to Bryant]. They keep their rows completely mowed and weeded, you can actually sit right under a bush and eat berries.” This is, of course, in between your bird-stalking activities.

With this testimonial, I believe Shelli should get at least one free admission this summer.

I shall provide a convenient map for those who may wish to go look for Batman* and eat blueberries themselves:


View Larger Map

There is also a kangaroo farm there. With actual kangaroos. And koalas. And wallabies. Any fan of Rocko’s Modern Life has got to want the wallabies. I think I’m going to force my intrepid companion to go adventuring with me this summer. Blueberries and Aussie animals. What could be better?

Well, some geology (pdf). There’s a terrace or bench there, upon which the Arlington Heights neighborhood sits. Everything’s pretty much glacial outwash, it appears, although the bedrock looks wild: “sandstone, shale, conglomerate, andesite,basalt, and metamorphased sedimentary and igneous rock.” Okay. That tells me this area’s had a rather eventful history, even before it got mauled by ice sheets, and if I can find any bedrock outcrops round there, I’ll be completely excited. Besides, the Skagit River Valley is exquisitely lovely, and the Cascades are right there, and it’s just a quick hop over to the San Juan Islands…

Suddenly, stalking Batman seems like a completely reasonable thing to do. Who’s with me?

*We’ve been calling him Batman. Or Batbird. But he also kinda looks like the Lone Ranger. Also, he might be a she, for all I know.

Comments

  1. Crip Dyke, MQ, Right Reverend Feminist FuckToy of Death & Her Handmaiden says

    Nunnah Nunnah Nunnah Nunnah
    Nunnah Nunnah Nunnah Nunnah

    WaxWing!

  2. Trebuchet says

    Yup, I have to agree it’s juvenile waxwing. Most likely a cedar waxwing as the Bohemian variant is much less common. I’ve never been able to tell them apart anyhow.

  3. rq says

    I’d say cedar waxwing, maybe not even a juvenile. It looks just as grey and cutely fluffy in almost all of its internet photos, even as an adult.

  4. Aubergine says

    “I was the shadow of the waxwing slain / By the false azure in the windowpane” – John Shade

  5. Tsu Dho Nimh says

    I love that mask. He’s so cute.

    Juvenile Cedar Waxwing – because the adults have yellow shading that this one doesn’t.

    Not a Bohemian Waxwing because they don’t have as much white around the eyes, and they have a black chin and throat.

  6. sailor1031 says

    Summer range for Bohemian Waxwings is further north so this is probably a cedar waxwing – there isn’t much difference at this age.

  7. starspider says

    I love that little guy. I want to pet him and feed him berries.

    According to Wikipedia, they’re good at sharing:

    “When the end of a twig holds a supply of berries that only one bird at a time can reach, members of a flock may line up along the twig and pass berries beak to beak down the line so that each bird gets a chance to eat.”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cedar_Waxwing