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Feb 23 2012

Free Geology eBooks Bonanza

Since getting my Kindle Fire, I’ve gone a bit mad. You can’t turn a bibliophile loose in an environment in which books that are not only free but good are readily available and expect anything less. I’ve not been on the internet much – too busy reading all those delicious free books – but when I have, I’ve galloped the tubes looking for moar free books.

(There’s also quite a bit of delicious paid content available, but after purchasing the Fire, and with several geological excursions planned, I need to keep expenses down. And who doesn’t love free stuff, amirite?)

I figured I’d share my finds. And if you’ve got finds, you can add them to the list, and between us all, we should have quite a resource going. I can add a new page to ye olde blog once we’ve got a solid list going. All I ask is that any recommendations you make aren’t pirated. Check to make sure the copyright’s expired or that the author actually did intend to give stuff away. Also, I’m concentrating on recent stuff in this post, but that doesn’t mean you have to: if there’s a geo classic you love, link it!

E-Books Directory. I stumbled across this doing a search for something. It’s glorious. There are books, plural: meaty, wonderful tomes, all freely offered by their copyright holders. Kid, candystore, I’m telling you.

Washington State Department of Natural Resources.  This is where I found a whole, big, beautiful, wonderful book entitled Roadside Geology of Mount Rainier and Vicinity and went mad with glee. There’s also a guide to Mt. St. Helens, some guides to Washington’s wine country, and a plethora of publications dealing in all sorts of geology. Have a look at their publications list and snag what you like. Your own state geological survey probably has some excellent stuff, as well – I know Oregon’s does. Let me know what treasures you find.

Ice-Age Flood Features in the Vicinity of the Pasco Basin and the Hanford Reach National Monument. I’ve only glanced through it, but it looks delish. I snagged the recommendation and link from the Northwest Geology Field Trips site, which has never steered me wrong.

Evolution of the Pacific Northwest. I’m in the middle of this now, and my only quibble is that each chapter is a separate pdf. Not much of a quibble, is that? I’d have paid good money for this book. It’s gorgeously illustrated, the geology is top-notch, and it kept me up late the night I began reading it. Love love love.

I’m positive there’s more out there. Let us gather together the links, and fill our ereaders and/or computers to the bursting with free geology.

Cat Endorsing Evolution of the Pacific Northwest

 

4 comments

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  1. 1
    Adrian

    Hi Dana
    Have you looked at Project Gutenberg? Lots of free stuff there.
    Sorry, don’t know how to add a link.

    1. 1.1
      F [i'm not here, i'm gone]

      Just paste a URL.

  2. 2
    F [i'm not here, i'm gone]

    http://www.oregonexplorer.info/ Has a bunch of stuff, some as PDF scans of paper, though. But it’s a freakin’ digital library. And you can submit to the library as well.

    I was led to this by Michael Welland, who posted this link to a 1975 issue of a periodical called The Ore Bin.
    http://www.oregonexplorer.info/data_files/OE_location/northcoast/documents/NorthCoastPDFs/vol37_no5_ocr.pdf

    Happy hunting!

  3. 3
    ogremk5

    If you are a science fiction fan then there are two great resources.

    The Baen Free Library has a good number of free e-books. Not just old science fiction, put some nearly first run stuff too.

    The Fifth Imperium has the complete works by a few authors (David Weber, John Ringo, and some others) and a lot of works by other authors.

    I’ve bought most of them in hardback, so I don’t even feel bad about downloading them all to my Fire.

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