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Ladies and Gentlemen, the Readers of The Blaze

I thought the comments on local news stories about the AHA sending a letter to the school system in Jackson, Mississippi about a mandatory convocation for teachers that was really a church service, but they were nothing compared to the comments on Glenn Beck’s The Blaze website’s article about it.

When are people going to stand up and start teaching these people that the Constitution’s First Amendment say’s that government shall make no law “respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.” Meaning it forbids an official establishment of religion, and something completely different from the much looser, imprecise term the uneducated like to use of “separation of church and state.” The Constitution only forbids government sponsorship and compulsion of religious exercise by individual citizens. It does not require hermetic “separation”—implying exclusion—of religion and religious persons from public affairs of state. I know that this will come as a shock to you Liberal and Atheist but just a little research and reading comprehension will lead you in the right direction.

Yeah, those uneducated people who use the phrase “separation of church and state.” Uneducated people like Jefferson and Madison. So the constitution “only forbids government sponsorship and compulsion of religious exercise by individual citizens,” which is exactly what happened here. A public school system — the government — forced teachers of a variety of religions and no religion to participate in religious exercises, including prayer and congregational call and response. They were forced to listen to people preach at them. Even by this commenter’s own standard, that’s a violation.

I still dont understand how the GOD haters can read any where in the constitution that this was illegal. I know the document inside and out and it is really grasping for straws to claim separation of church and state. The constitution I learned just says CONGRESS shall establish no religion……….. Last time I checked a school or city council or state government is NOT the Congress of the United States.

Pure ignorance of the 14th Amendment.

Professional whiners. All they have to do is win one slip and fall and they can Alinsky forever. WTSHTF they will go first.

Uh…WTF?

The establishment clause of the first amendment is merely intended to prevent the establishment of a state church like the Church of England, and it is not intended to remove religion from public life or schools. Thomas Jefferson, the man who wrote the letter which coined the phrase “separation of church and state” supported government funds being given to Indian tribes to build churches and pay clergy. Jefferson also firmly supported religion being taught in public schools like the University of Virginia.

Uh, no. In fact, Jefferson created the University of Virginia and explicitly did not have religious studies at the school.

Atheist are afraid of being alone in Hell.so they try to drag as many people as possible behind them?

Now that’s just funny. In order to be afraid of going to hell, we’d have to believe in hell. And if we believed that we’d be thrown into a lake of fire to have our flesh burned for all eternity, would we think it would be better if more people were facing the same fate?

It’s time for all Christians to stand up and say, “If the Lord’s presence and guidance are NOT sought for our actions, then I won’t participate in the action.”

Why? Why can’t you just pray for the lord’s guidance yourself? Why do you insist that everyone else do so, or sit through it? Does God only hear prayers if a non-Christian is forced to listen to them?

It goes on like that for more than 200 comments.

Comments

  1. says

    Look, Ed, if you continue to focus on the tiny majority of Christians who believe and act like this you will miss the huge minority of deep, thoughtful Christians who have no power and are ignored for some reason.

  2. John Pieret says

    Professional whiners. All they have to do is win one slip and fall and they can Alinsky forever. WTSHTF they will go first.

    Uh…WTF?

    I think it translates from the Wingnut as: “The first thing we do, let’s kill all the lawyers (then the atheists).”

  3. hunter says

    “Why do you insist that everyone else do so, or sit through it?”

    um — there’s safety in numbers?

  4. erichoug says

    Again, failure to think it through. If someone forced you to sit through a Muslim service would you be OK with it? What about a Wiccan service ( I can’t stop laughing during those and usually get asked to leave) would you be OK with it? What about a Hindu service?

    If these people can’t honestly answer YES to all of the above question they they should not be allowing the christian service to go forward.

  5. Chiroptera says

    It does not require hermetic “separation”—implying exclusion—of…religious persons from public affairs of state.

    That is true. However, it does prohibit the religious person to use his or her position or authority to endorse or to discourage — or even to seem to endorse or discourage — religious beliefs and practices.

    It does not require hermetic “separation”—implying exclusion—of religion…from public affairs of state.

    Actually, that is exactly what it requires.

  6. eric says

    Pure ignorance of the 14th Amendment.

    I’m pretty sure that when it comes to amendments, there are a number of people who rarely (or can’t) count past 2.

  7. davidforrest says

    “Why do you insist that everyone else do so, or sit through it?”

    …because this religion is based on torturing the innocent.

  8. dugglebogey says

    Your fricking churches sit empty all goddamn week! DO YOUR FUCKING PRAYING THERE. THAT’S WHAT IT’S FOR!

  9. D. C. Sessions says

    I’m pretty sure that when it comes to amendments, there are a number of people who rarely (or can’t) count past 2.

    .. which comes before 1.

  10. matty1 says

    Thomas Jefferson, the man who wrote the letter which coined the phrase “separation of church and state” supported government funds being given to Indian tribes to build churches and pay clergy.

    I think someone, possibly you, wrote about this a couple of years back and it was one of those things that was true but misleading. Jefferson supported a particular treaty with a tribe that included meeting that tribe’s request for funds to build a church and hire a preacher. That is not the same thing as being generally in favour of spreading Christianity to native Americans.

  11. pianoman, Heathen & Torontophile says

    Eric says: “I’m pretty sure that when it comes to amendments, there are a number of people who rarely (or can’t) count past 2.”

    Yeah, but if the commenter is from Mississippi, he may be able to count to 14 using both of his hands.

  12. lofgren says

    This is remarkable! I am truly in awe of the commenters’ ingenuity! HOW DID THEY GET THE CRAYON ON THEIR MONITORS TO SHOW UP ON THE INTERNET???

  13. Blondin says

    I’m guessing “WTSHTF ” stands for “when the shit hits the fan” and is supposed to refer to the second coming?

  14. Childermass says

    eric @ 9: “I’m pretty sure that when it comes to amendments, there are a number of people who rarely (or can’t) count past 2.”

    Actually I think they start counting at 2 and immediately skip to 10.

  15. says

    erichoug,
    I’m sure they would have no problem being forced to sit through a brief Hindu prayer.

    “In an unabashed show of bigotry, religious right organizations disrupted the first Hindu ever to offer the opening prayer in the U.S. Senate. The American Family Association (of Ford Boycott fame) organized its supporters to lobby the Senate to stop the participation of Chaplain Rajan Zed. Operation Rescue activists disrupted Zed and were arrested. Even after the event, the Christian right piled on, with an outpouring of vituperative writing.”
    http://www.jewsonfirst.org/07c/hindu_chaplain.html

    OK, maybe I was wrong.

  16. Ray, rude-ass yankee (Whimsy, I has it) says

    “WTSHTF ” = “when the shit hits the fan” I think it means the RWNJs want to perpetrate a theocracy on us, and when the revolution comes EVERYONE they don’t like will be the first up against the wall in front of a firing squad.

  17. Michael Heath says

    A Blaze commenter:

    Atheist are afraid of being alone in Hell.so they try to drag as many people as possible behind them?

    Ed reponds:

    Now that’s just funny. In order to be afraid of going to hell, we’d have to believe in hell. And if we believed that we’d be thrown into a lake of fire to have our flesh burned for all eternity, would we think it would be better if more people were facing the same fate?

    I perceive this as stereotypical psychological projection by a conservative Christian. Let’s remember this population celebrates the nature of a supposed god so evil he supposedly promises to punish some unimaginable suffering for all eternity. So here, once again ad nauseam, we see one Christian projecting their own evil nature unto an undeserving ‘other’. Here that’s atheists, who don’t conclude there’s a Hell awaiting them.

  18. Michael Heath says

    lofgren writes:

    This is remarkable! I am truly in awe of the commenters’ ingenuity! HOW DID THEY GET THE CRAYON ON THEIR MONITORS TO SHOW UP ON THE INTERNET???

    I’d like to tip my hat to the developer of the crayon spell-check app.

  19. dan4 says

    @11: “Your friggin churches sit empty all goddam week!”

    How would/could you possibly know this?

  20. jws1 says

    Well, dan4, I drive by their many churches all over my town during the week and nary a car is parked there. Also the stores are full.

  21. dingojack says

    Well Dan,
    In Mississippi (the state in question):
    94% are religious (about 92% are Christian).
    60% of these religious types attend religious activities at least once a week.
    Surveys my friend, surveys.
    Dingo
    ———
    In the US as a whole:
    84% are religious (a little over 81% are Christian)
    Of these 60% attend less than once a week.

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