Kent Hovind Facing New Charges


Only a year or so away from being released from what, quite frankly, I thought was a too-long sentence, Kent Hovind is facing new charges for criminal contempt of court for filing a lien on the property that the government seized in order to pay off his bill for back taxes he refused to pay:

The latest criminal charge relates to the efforts that the IRS has been making to collect from Kent Hovind. Real property in Pensacola had been forfeited to the government. In 2012, there was an injunction against Creation Science Evangelism and its representative and agents from seeking to file liens on the forfeited property. Nonetheless, a lien was filed – a lis pendens. I had to look that up.

In US law, a lis pendens is a written notice that a lawsuit has been filed concerning real estate, involving either the title to the property or a claimed ownership interest in it. The notice is usually filed in the county land records office. Recording a lis pendens against a piece of property alerts a potential purchaser or lender that the property’s title is in question, which makes the property less attractive to a buyer or lender. After the notice is filed, anyone who nevertheless purchases the land or property described in the notice takes subject to the ultimate decision of the lawsuit.

The notice indicates that the filing of the lis pendens constitutes criminal contempt and has scheduled a trial on September 8, 2014.

The property in question has apparently already been sold off, so this riling didn’t actually do Hovind any good. As much as I despise Kent Hovind, I think it’s time to let this guy go. People commit serious violent crimes without doing anywhere near the amount of time he’s spent in prison.

Comments

  1. Doc Bill says

    It’s going to be interesting when Hovind the Senior gets out of the big house and goes to work with Hovind the Dumber, aka Eric. I’m predicting a rift wider than Olduvai Gorge.

  2. says

    “this riling didn’t actually do Hovind any good.”

    I know it’s just a lapsus calami such as we all mike[sic], but:

    rile verb \ˈrī(-ə)l\ : to make (someone) angry : to irritate or annoy (someone)

    Ie exactly what it did!!

  3. John Pieret says

    People commit serious violent crimes without doing anywhere near the amount of time he’s spent in prison.

    I tend to agree but you have to remember this guy has been pulling theses sorts of stunts for decades. He tried to declare bankruptcy to avoid paying taxes (which involved perjury that he wasn’t prosecuted for) and before his sentencing on the tax fraud conviction he was making jailhouse calls (despite signs on all the phones that calls were recorded) vowing to “make life miserable” for the IRS and to keep suing the government. Sometimes you have to get some people’s attention.

  4. Reginald Selkirk says

    what, quite frankly, I thought was a too-long sentence

    There was a complete lack of the offender acknowledging that what he did was wrong. And you can see from the current action that he still isn’t giving up.

  5. jimmyfromchicago says

    The moral here is probably “Don’t piss off a federal judge.” Hovind goes beyond being a mere tax protestor and is now edging into sovereign citizen territory. As with his fight with the City of Pensacola over the construction of “Dinosaur Adventure Land” in his back yard–which he could have avoided by obtaining a $500 building permit–Hovind seems to enjoy battling the government, as this feeds his persecution complex. Judge Rogers seems to be giving him what he wants.

    The sentence seems out of proportion, especially when you consider that sentences for even very serious financial wrongdoing tend to be much lighter than this. Ivan Boesky got 3-1/2 years for insider trading and absolutely no one at HSBC went to jail for laundering $750 million in drug money. Hovind’s ham-handed attempts to avoid his tax obligations and hide his income were as comical as his plea of “subordination of false muster,” but he is small potatoes. On the other hand, he doesn’t help himself out much by continuing his pattern of vexatious litigation even after ten years in prison.

  6. raven says

    what, quite frankly, I thought was a too-long sentence

    Hovind did that to himself!!!

    Normally income tax evasion is treated as a civil offense and settled that way. The IRS just wants their money. It costs ca $30,000 a year to keep someone in prison and it isn’t cost effective for many crimes.

    Hovind just stalled and beat around the bush and refused to cooperate.

    He violated the First Rule of Holes. When you find yourself in a hole, the first thing to do is…stop digging. And as we see above, he is still digging.

    PS The IRS and the state might also have been afraid of him. They raided his place and seized an arsenal of weapons. (Why does a xian minister need an arsenal anyway?). And his behavior is erratic and seemingly robotic. It’s not like he ever seems to learn anything or modify his activities.

  7. Michael Heath says

    In 2012, there was an injunction against Creation Science Evangelism and its representative and agents from seeking to file liens on the forfeited property.

    I love that name; it works on more levels than Mr. Hovind could imagine.

  8. abb3w says

    @0, Ed Brayton

    People commit serious violent crimes without doing anywhere near the amount of time he’s spent in prison.

    @5, John Pieret

    you have to remember this guy has been pulling theses sorts of stunts for decades

    Seconded. Arguably, there are serious violent crimes which are less costly to society as a whole than sovereign citizens’ judicial spamming.

    @7, jimmyfromchicago

    Hovind goes beyond being a mere tax protestor and is now edging into sovereign citizen territory.

    Hovind’s bizarre plea was apparently taken from the playbook of an Oregon sovereign citizen group; he’s not merely edging into it, but rather so solidly into sovereign citizen territory that the border is over the horizon from him.

  9. pocketnerd says

    Ultimately I don’t think it matters much when KenHo is released — he’ll likely be back in prison in 2-3 years, for doing more of exactly what landed him there in the first place. He’s too smug to learn from his mistakes and too proud to see his legal woes as anything but anti-Christian persecution aimed at silencing THE TROOTH.

  10. joel says

    “People commit serious violent crimes without doing anywhere near the amount of time he’s spent in prison.”

    True. But then, people who commit serious violent crimes almost always at least pretend some show of remorse. Hovind is doing hard time because he continues to insist, loudly, that he is right and all the laws that he broke are wrong. He is making it impossible for the courts to show any any leniency.

    I agree that his crimes, taken at face value, don’t justify his time behind bars. But courts always take into account the “disposition of the prisoner”, as well they should. It’s an excellent predictor of recidivism.

  11. EnlightenmentLiberal says

    People commit serious violent crimes without doing anywhere near the amount of time he’s spent in prison.

    Yea, but those people at least pay lip service to the law. I generally have a soft spot for throwing the book at someone who brazenly defies the court and earns criminal contempt.

  12. says

    …he’ll likely be back in prison in 2-3 years, for doing more of exactly what landed him there in the first place.

    I agree. It’s hard to imagine Ken going straight and accepting the fact that his tax protestor beliefs are bunkus. His personality is not suited to acknowledgements of being wrong. (Hence, the creationist arguments so bad that other creationists warn against using them.)

    “Ken Hovind in trouble with law again” is a headline we’re likely to keep seeing until the doofus dies.

  13. wsierichs says

    Ed:
    First, I’ve been reading your items for a couple of years and always enjoy them. I agree with you much of the time. This time, I disagree, in part because of arguments by some commenters. A criminal who tells a judge he’s innocent when the evidence is overwhelming is asking for a longer sentence, and including sovereign citizen arguments shows he will likely continue his illegal actions upon release. So his sentence might arguably have been too long yet he equally arguably provoked the judge to lean toward the max.
    Second, putting a false lien on someone else’s property can inflict financial harm upon the victim. Depending upon the value of the property, if the victim is trying to sell it, it could reduce the value by hundreds to tens of thousands of dollars. The judge could simply vacate the false lien, but that won’t stop Hovind from doing it again, perhaps repeatedly. I suspect that, based upon his history, even getting extra prison time for contempt won’t stop him from continuing to harass the property owner if he can. And if he’s a rabid gun type, I would be worried about living on his former property once he’s released. There is something wrong in Hovind’s mind and I think it possible that he might cross the line from mere harassment of officials and the property owner into violence.

  14. Childermass says

    Yes Ivan Boesky and other people who did worse financial crimes got far less time in jail. But Boesky did something that Hovind did not. When the handwriting was on the wall, Boesky made a deal with the prosecutor. When the handwriting was on the wall for Hovind, he just kept going like nothing had happened, committing more crimes, basically acting like an ape tossing his feces around, and stretching the fight for many years. If Hovind had not done that, he probably would not have served more than a year or two assuming he got any time at all. Sticking it in the face of the prosecutors, the courts, the IRS, and so on for so long is not something that will be accepted in good humor. Indeed it would be hard for anyone to take them seriously if they allowed the challenge to their authority to go unchallenged. As it is, the government has not charged him with a fraction of what very clear he is guilty of. They could probably got him for a fair number years more on perjury alone.

    In short, Hovind did it to himself.

    And even if he has served too long, what he had done now can’t be tolerated. Until he gets it though his head that he can’t do this sort of crap, he is exactly where be belongs.

    It is sad really. For the cause, I would just love him make himself the public face of creationism again. With Ken Ham, you need a high school understanding of science to refute him (or what should be a high school understanding). With Hovind, he makes arguments that a bright second grader should see through. Why would one need to parody creationism if he was around again?

  15. says

    Kent is currently scheduled to be released to home confinement in February of 2015.

    If Kent and Jo are serious about wanting Kent back home (which they may not be), then I think Kent ought to find some repentance and start begging for a plea deal with the feds.

    Such a deal might involve certain, specific admissions by Kent and an agreement as to what he may and may not do upon being released.

    The Government clearly has the advantage regarding any negotiated settlement, but if Kent and Jo are serious about getting him home sooner rather than later, now is the time to make the deal. After all, it’s not as if Kent really believes what he has been preaching about the Government and taxes and is not aware of his guilt.

    What about it, Kent?
    How serious are you about being released as currently scheduled?

  16. anubisprime says

    It is not beyond the bounds of credulity that the erstwhile ‘caretakers’ come ‘inheritors’ of Dr Dino’s emporium and all it contains, might well be encouraging their hero to pursue his insane battle of righteousness, calculating that said hero will be banged up a tad longer then he first envisaged.

    Maybe they ‘suggest’ it is his Christian duty to tilt at the satanic windmills of IRS depravity, and they have got his back!

    I doubt anyone with a smidgeon of reality would consider that the good ‘Dr’ is actually on a crusade of ‘trooth’ and is willing to sacrifice his carcass to the greater glory of god for a point in some vague and simplistic ‘principle’.

    It was, and still is marginally, a scam that got to big to hide the profit.

    Of course it would not be a surprise that the original supporters and fan club of utter bullshite will get their dumb bone tickled elsewhere these days…I am sure ‘Hameroid’ was extremely grateful and regard the elevated victim intake to his scam as manna from heaven!

    But from what I understand the actual numbers to his little con is falling also these days…maybe the main calculation in the legion of super dimwads is that there is not enough marks cash to go around and maintain the style to which the purveyors of such asinine fatuous nonsense are accustomed.

    So could well be with Dr Dino back in the hunt it would no doubt tread on a few folks toes and prevent them ‘from doing gods work’ …as well as being a drain on what cash is flowing in the coffers!…bit inconvenient all round by the shape of it!

    Besides with Kent Snr banged up they have a ready made martyr to Christendom with which to use as leverage in their mewling and pity garnering.

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