Chuck Norris: Anti-Vaxxer


Chuck Norris believes so many astonishingly stupid things that it certainly should come as no surprise that he’s apparently also an anti-vaxxer. In his latest Worldnetdaily column, he claims that vaccines are the cause of allergies and says some seriously dumb things along the way.

As I discussed last week, airborne allergies are just part of the rising epidemic in allergies in this country. Allergies triggered by food, as well as by the environment, have been sharply on the rise in recent years. Scientists call it the atopic march, the progression and intensification of allergic disease. In this forward advance, food allergies are of special note. They represent the most common cause of anaphylaxis (hypersensitivity to a foreign protein or a drug), says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Children and adolescents are particularly susceptible to this potentially fatal form of severe allergic reaction.

Though immunologists claim that this form of allergic reaction is a result of an immune system abnormality, the doctor who first identified and named the condition came to a different conclusion. Dr. Charles Richet’s research at the turn of the 20th century concluded it was a side effect of vaccination – the introduction of substances directly into the blood, bypassing the modifying effects of the digestive system. Heather Fraser, alternative medicine expert and author of “The History of the Peanut Allergy Epidemic,” recounts how the rise of this form of disease management treatment took place during the dawn of the Industrial Revolution and the accompanying massive influx of immigrants. It spawned a relatively new and emerging pharmaceutical industry. Soon, compulsory vaccination for military and civilian populations was supporting this industry’s growth. And a new phrase was formed: serum sickness. By 1906, this sickness was being characterized as the first man-made allergic reaction.

So immunologists, with access to all of today’s medical technology and our vastly superior understanding of the human body, especially at the molecular level, are wrong because a doctor that died almost 80 years ago had a different idea? Wow, Chuck. That’s freaking brilliant. And Heather Fraser is not an expert on any kind of medicine, her degree is in history. She is as much an “expert” on alternative medicine as you are. Unfortunately, you know next to nothing about actual medicine, as you prove here:

As I mentioned last week, our immune system has evolved to expect parasites and to produce friendly microbes (bacteria), or what are known as suppressor cells, to combat disease.

Uh, Chuck. No. The immune system does not produce “bacteria” to combat disease and suppressor cells are not bacteria, they are human cells that attack bacteria. You should probably stick to roundhouse kicks and selling exercise equipment.

Comments

  1. timberwoof says

    I read about biology in Scientific American once when I stayed at a Holiday Inn, and I can tell that when it comes to biology, Chuck is a schmuck.

  2. Lithified Detritus says

    As I mentioned last week, our immune system has evolved to expect parasites and to produce friendly microbes (bacteria), or what are known as suppressor cells, to combat disease.

    Interesting. Here’s what he had to say about evolution in his first WND column:

    But here’s what I really think about the theory of evolution: It’s not real. It is not the way we got here. In fact, the life you see on this planet is really just a list of creatures God has allowed to live.

    Has he changed his mind about evolution, or is he just completely clueless?

  3. Skip White says

    So I’m assuming at some point, his beard must have punched the rest of his head really, really hard.

  4. says

    I feel like there’s a classic “Chuck Norris” joke involving brains and/or good sense to go near him.

    But I’m too lazy to come up with it.

  5. says

    Apparently, I’m also too lazy to properly construct a sentence.

    That first sentence should read ‘I feel like there’s a classic “Chuck Norris” joke involving brains and/or good sense being too afraid to go near him.’

  6. mauriletremblay says

    Chuck Norris is an idiot. But his last point, though ill-phrased, is a valid one: “our immune system has evolved to expect parasites and to [host] friendly microbes (bacteria) … to combat disease. In a world with no parasites, the system becomes unbalanced.”

    For more on this topic by someone who isn’t an idiot, check out Moises Velazquez-Manoff’s TEDx talk.

  7. Sastra says

    Sometimes I wonder whether the political divide within the anti-vaxx crowd may eventually work in favor of vaccination — and getting more kids vaccinated. When you get right down to it true believers in conspiracy theories and/or alt med don’t seem to be driven so much by the science and evidence, as by a strong desire to identify with a brave group of mavericks. People like them, people who model the kind of role they want to play in life.

    So a crunchy granola all-natural science-denying liberal is perhaps more likely to reject anti-vaxx propaganda if they see it coming from science-denying fundamentalist conservatives — and vice versa.

    I don’t know. Maybe. I think I’ve seen it work for smaller things, where a conspiracy theory suddenly loses its appeal when it turns out to be coming from the Other Side.

  8. says

    Sastra “I don’t know. Maybe. I think I’ve seen it work for smaller things, where a conspiracy theory suddenly loses its appeal when it turns out to be coming from the Other Side.”
    But don’t you see? The Other Side being on my side is all a part of the conspiracy! That is exactly the kind of thing Big Vaccine would do! Why do you think the Other Side is against vaccines for such transparently stupid reasons, while mine make perfect sense, like the mercury that vaccines don’t use causing autism?
    Hold on.
    I can’t remember if that’s their stupid reason or my good one.

  9. Joe Mama says

    I really wish these anti-vaxxers wouldn’t let their fear of needles endanger the health of everyone around them.

  10. kimberlyherbert says

    How about the simple fact more of us are surviving severe life threatening reactions because of medical care has advanced. In my case my doctors credited my Mom’s and neighbor’s medical training with keeping me alive long enough to get to the ER. I have been told that kids who had similar reactions to their first mouthful of peanut butter and died – often had choking listed as the cause of death.

    Another relative was tested very young due to other diagnosed problems. They retested him at regular intervals. He “out grew” most of his food allergies. The docs say basically his immune system corrected itself. Not having been exposed to the allergens helped. He had to catch up on some vaccinations because of the egg allergy that he out grew.

    Other than that he is on the same “modified” schedule I was on. 1 vaccine at a time with a few days to a week in between. That way if we have some bizarre reaction it is easier narrow things down.

  11. raven says

    is a valid one: “our immune system has evolved to expect parasites and to [host] friendly microbes (bacteria) … to combat disease. In a world with no parasites, the system becomes unbalanced.”

    Not really.

    We evolved to reproduce as soon as possible and expect to be dead by 35.

    Up until the middle ages, average life spans ran around 35. Even a century ago, in the USA it was 47. Our average lifespan of 77 is an artifact of modern medicine and very recent.

    Even if you get the whole series of vaccines, you will still be exposed to a wide variety of immungens. A large number of respiratory diseases, GI ailments, skin infections, pollens, molds etc..

  12. forestdragon says

    Question for those who know about this subject more than I do: if you’re allergic to eggs, how do you get the vaccinations you need that are cultured in eggs? I’m thinking the annual flu shots here, but there’s doubtlessly others.

  13. Artor says

    Hey, maybe Chucky deserves some slack. He wasn’t exactly a Rhodes Scholar before Bruce Lee kicked the ever-loving shit out of him. How do you think you would recover from that level of ass-whooping? It must suck to be Chuck.

  14. anubisprime says

    Who knew?…actually the relevant comment is …’Who really cares’?

    Anyone dumb enough to drool after his advice is dumb enough to screw up their own lives regardless.

  15. Nick Gotts says

  16. eric says

    To be honest, I’m kinda glad Norris is on the anti-vax (and anti-evolution) side. If he were pro-vax (and pro-TOE), I would be forced to consider the possibility that all of mainstream biology must be wrong.

  17. JustaTech says

    Forestdragon @19: It depends on the strength of your reaction to eggs. If you just get a rash, and you really need the vaccine (you work in a hosipital, or with little kids or the elderly) then your doc would probably give you the vaccine but ask you to sit around the office just in case you have a serious reaction.

    If you have a very strong allergic reaction to eggs, and you aren’t in a high-risk/high-need group then you wouldn’t get the vaccine. And you would probably ask everyone you interact with to get it on your behalf.

  18. corwyn says

    Am I the only one who thinks “Totally worth it!” Seriously, even if true, I would rather have 2 million kids with a peanut allergy, that 2 million kids dead from whopping cough.

  19. says

    I am sure within time we can find a way to properly prevent or treat allergies to where they will have little effect on our immune system. And given that life spans are much longer now as compared to pre-industrial America. No your not crazy to like things the way they are now. Longer life is definitely a bonus.

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