First They Came For the Carbon Dioxide Molecules »« The Life of a Woman on Youtube

The Death of Pat Buchanan’s America

In his latest column, old-school racist paleo-conservative Pat Buchanan declares that America is “no longer 1 nation, 1 people,” as if we ever were such a thing. But what he means by this is that we have too many brown-skinned people here now and he doesn’t like it one bit.

The real issue: Will America remain one nation, or are we are on the road to Balkanization and the breakup of America into ethnic enclaves? For, as Ronald Reagan said, a nation that cannot control its borders isn’t really a nation anymore.

Ronald Reagan? The same Ronald Reagan who signed into law a bill that allowed any undocumented person who had entered the country prior to 1982 — everyone, not just young people who were brought here by their parents — to stay and become legalized? I believe that’s what Pat calls “amnesty” today and is firmly opposed. In fact, Reagan said during his 1984 campaign debate with Walter Mondale:

“I believe in the idea of amnesty for those who have put down roots and lived here, even though sometime back they may have entered illegally.”

So once again we see a conservative cite Ronald Reagan to support the exact opposite position of the one he actually supported.

We were not a nation of immigrants in 1789.

They came later. From 1845-1849, the Irish fleeing the famine. From 1890-1920, the Germans. Then the Italians, Poles, Jews and other Eastern Europeans. Then, immigration was suspended in 1924.

Hey, you know who he doesn’t mention? The Irish. His ancestors, who immigrated here. The ones who were met with the same xenophobic racism — “Irish need not apply” — that he now spews at immigrants today. He didn’t mention them, of course, because they’re white so they obviously belong here. And it would be embarrassing to point out how much of a giant hypocrite he is.

But we are no longer that “band of brethren.” We are no longer one unique people “descended from the same ancestors, speaking the same language, professing the same religion.”

We are from every continent and country. Nearly 4 in 10 Americans trace their ancestry to Asia, Africa and Latin America. We are a multiracial, multilingual, multicultural society in a world where countless countries are being torn apart over race, religion and roots.

We no longer speak the same language, worship the same God, honor the same heroes or share the same holidays. Christmas and Easter have been privatized. Columbus is reviled. Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee are out of the pantheon. Cesar Chavez is in.

He’s dancing around, pretending to say something different than what he’s really saying: We’re no longer white like him. He sees dark people and it gives him dark, dystopic visions. If he thinks we’re being “torn apart” by race now, what were we 50 years ago or more? Oh, but those were the “good ol’ days” for Pat, when white people were still in charge and could keep those with more melanin in their skin in their proper place. Today, those people actually get treated as human beings. What’s next, liberty and justice for all?

Comments

  1. Chiroptera says

    I for one would welcome the death of Buchanan’s America.

    In fact, I would dance on its grave.

  2. says

    From 1845-1849, the Irish fleeing the famine.

    Hey, you know who he doesn’t mention? The Irish. His ancestors, who immigrated here.

    I can’t believe I’m defending Pat Friggin’ Buchanan, but in the quote above where you say he doesn’t mention the Irish… He mentions the Irish.

  3. chisaihana5219 says

    “We were not a nation of immigrants in 1789.” Huh? Where did he think the American colonists came from? Did the Pilgrims materialize out of thin air? Did the Spanish who settled in St. Augustine come up out of the ground like flowers? Who does he think fought in the American Revolution in 1776?

  4. scienceavenger says

    “They came later. From 1845-1849, the Irish fleeing the famine. From 1890-1920, the Germans. Then the Italians, Poles, Jews and other Eastern Europeans. Then, immigration was suspended in 1924. ”

    Hey, you know who he doesn’t mention? The Irish.[emphasis mine]

    Looks like you had the same kind of evening I did.

  5. John Pieret says

    We were not a nation of immigrants in 1789.

    Tell that to the Native Americans who were here first. They weren’t allowed into the club the immigrants in 1789.

    Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee are out of the pantheon. Cesar Chavez is in.

    So, two people who wanted not to be part of the US are in the “pantheon” of “one nation” Americans but someone who worked to get equal rights for all Americans isn’t?

    Pat, you can’t possibly get more transparent without having to wrap you head in bandages like Claude Raines.

  6. dhall says

    This country wouldn’t have to be a nation torn apart by race, religion and roots either, if people like Buchanan would shut the hell up, settle down, and stop placing such arbitrary, indefensible values on race, religion and roots.

  7. D. C. Sessions says

    From 1845-1849, the Irish fleeing the famine.

    Hey, you know who he doesn’t mention? The Irish.

    Ummm, Ed?

  8. dugglebogey says

    I can’t wait for the next “Chavez Day” national holiday. They are always a blast.

  9. says

    dhall “This country wouldn’t have to be a nation torn apart by race, religion and roots either, if people like Buchanan would shut the hell up, settle down, and stop placing such arbitrary, indefensible values on race, religion and roots.”
    Now you’re just being ridiculous. They aren’t arbitrary. They’re my “race, religion and roots”. Yours, in contrast, are weird and foreign and everything wrong with America and also your cooking smells bad.

  10. frankniddy says

    Christmas and Easter have been privatized.

    And here I thought small government conservatives like him wanted everything to be privatised.

  11. D. C. Sessions says

    “We were not a nation of immigrants in 1789.” Huh? Where did he think the American colonists came from?

    That’s just it — they weren’t immigrants, they were colonists, come to build the Great City on the Hill in an uninhabited wilderness.

  12. says

    We are from every continent and country. Nearly 4 in 10 Americans trace their ancestry to Asia, Africa and Latin America. We are a multiracial, multilingual, multicultural society

    .
    Sounds good to me!

  13. eric says

    We are no longer one unique people “descended from the same ancestors, speaking the same language, professing the same religion.”

    Last time I checked, Spain was part of Europe. So the (continental) Americans that are descendents of Spanish immigrants have the same claim to being part of that ‘one unique’ western European heritage that you do, Bill.

    And the ‘professing the same religion’ thing is just baffling. They’re catholics, just like O’Reilly,in contras to most of the other European immigrants. How could Bill Papal O’Reilly possibly point at hispanic immigrants and imply that they don’t share in America’s “one unique” religion? Isn’t that an own goal?

  14. frankniddy says

    I really, really hate to run afoul of Godwin’s Law, but “1 nation, 1 people” sounds so much better in German: “Ein Volk, ein Reich.” Of course, every time Buchanan talks about immigration, it’s hard to not to hear what he’s saying in German.

  15. Donnie says

    And I love it! We are 4 in 10 from other continents not Europe. This embracing the differences is what separates conservatives and progressives. Our multiculturalism, our multiracial America will make us stronger as a country – once we start learning second and third languages. Once more than 25% of Americans have a passport and travel outside the country (hell, I will take outside their county).

  16. says

    I seem to recall a lot of a Spanish-speaking people in California in 1789. So later the US takes California, Northern Europeans move there and complain that it just ain’t like the old days in California, when it was inhabited by the native Anglo people.

  17. says

    well actually there was no legal immigration until the Naturalization Act of 1790!

    Also, while the mixing and matching of Scots and Irish over time is very complicated, I always thought that Buchanan was a Scottish name.

  18. dingojack says

    The Thirteen Colonies consisted of 78.6% Whites and 21.4% Blacks in 1770 (the peak of Blacks by percentage population)
    By 1790 the USA had 80.7% Whites and 19.3% Blacks; by 1860 it was 85.6% White, 14.1% Black, 0.1% Amerindian/Inuit, 0.1% Asia/Pacific Islander; in 2010 72.4% White, 12.6% Black, Amerindian/Inuit 0.9%, Asian/Pacific Islander 4.9%, Other race 6.2%, Two or more 2.9%, Hispanic 16.3%.

    Hence in 1790 4 out of 5 of the American Colonists could trace their ancestry to Europe (mostly England, but certainly not all) and 1 out of 5 could trace their ancestry back to Africa (mostly the ‘slave coast’). I’m not sure what this proves exactly.

    Dingo

  19. Larry says

    Buchanan’s tirade sounds much better in its original German.

    (Thanks to Molly Ivins, r.i.p.)

  20. D. C. Sessions says

    We are no longer one unique people “descended from the same ancestors, speaking the same language …”

    And a good thing there weren’t any of them speaking French, Dutch, German, Yiddish, Gaelic, Spanish, Cherokee, …

    Ol’ Pat and David Barton must have a grand time when they get together and reminisce about the Good Old Days.

  21. D. C. Sessions says

    By the way, he’s actually quoting a common variant (WRT the Anschluss): “Ein Volk, ein Sprache, ein Reich.”

  22. howardhershey says

    And the reason why immigration was “suspended” in 1924 is because of racism against slavs, italians, Greeks, Jews (a major concern of the proposers), and, most of all, Asians. Actually immigration was not “suspended”; it was restricted by national origin (except for Asians, who were completely excluded) at 2% of their 1910 numbers in America. Interestingly enough, there were no quotas for people from Mexico and the Americas. All they had to do was walk across the border. A literacy test (in any language) was required in 1917. So there were large quotas for English and Germanic immigrants. The undesirables from Eastern and Southern Europe were considered by the Klan (ascendant at that time) and upper-crust biologists and psychologists to be mentally inferior to good old Anglo-Saxon stock. This was the apex era of American eugenic thought. Same attitude that good ole boy Pat has today. Fortunately, my Polish/Russian grandparents got in before the door was slammed shut.

  23. boadinum says

    “Columbus is reviled.”

    Of course Columbus is reviled! The man never set foot on what is now American soil, yet he managed to bring to the Americas disease, slavery, and barbarism to people far more civilized than he was.

    So now we honor him by having “Columbus Day” sales. If you really want to be like Columbus you should just walk into any store and take whatever you want.

    Columbus’s name should be removed from every town, city, and street in America. There are plenty of Native American names available as replacements.

  24. Hercules Grytpype-Thynne says

    Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee are out of the pantheon.

    Were they ever in it? I must have missed that.

  25. says

    I put a comment up with two links and it’s disappeared into the oubliette of lost comments.

    I expanded it, it’s at my place.

    Polrant.blogspot.com

    Not blogwhoring, just too lazy to retype the original.

  26. alanb says

    @Dingo: Hence in 1790 4 out of 5 of the American Colonists could trace their ancestry to Europe (mostly England, but certainly not all)…

    Actually, the first large wave of non-English, non-African immigration was from Germany. This was especially true in Pennsylvania (where they are still called “Pennsylvania Dutch”). By the date of 1789 cited by Pat they were a third of the population of Pennsylvania. And many of them did not speak English. So even if we give the English a bye, we have always been a nation of immigrants.

  27. says

    eric “How could Bill Papal O’Reilly possibly point at hispanic immigrants and imply that they don’t share in America’s “one unique” religion? Isn’t that an own goal?”
    No. They can’t be real Catholics. Real Catholics listen to the Pope. More importantly, they vote Republican. These new “Catholics” lean Democrat, and worse, they don’t even want to kick themselves out of the country!

     
    frankniddy “I really, really hate to run afoul of Godwin’s Law, but “1 nation, 1 people” sounds so much better in German: “Ein Volk, ein Reich.” Of course, every time Buchanan talks about immigration, it’s hard to not to hear what he’s saying in German.”
    Learn a little history. America’s motto was “E Unum Unum”.

  28. lpetrich says

    I doubt that Pat Buchanan would enjoy what many Colonial-era Americans thought about Catholics. Would he enjoy being considered an idolator and a subject of a foreign power? Would he enjoy not being able to vote or hold public office because of that? Several colonies had done exactly that.

  29. colnago80 says

    Re #24

    They are certainly in the Pantheon here in Virginia where there are numerous schools named after them.

  30. anbheal says

    @9 M.O. — do you honestly believe that boiled cabbage smells better than cochinita pibil?

    Cuz man alive, have I got some bottled farts for sale, real cheap too, look for me on eBay.

  31. monad says

    @24 Hercules:
    I think Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee were in the pantheon, but then left it to make a new one.

  32. says

    anbheal “@9 M.O. — do you honestly believe that boiled cabbage smells better than cochinita pibil?”
    Boiled cabbage smells like America. Why can’t you foreign “Americans” eat good American food like French fries and pizza?

  33. busterggi says

    “are we are on the road to Balkanization and the breakup of America into ethnic enclaves?”

    Coming from the man who practically invented the ‘Southern Strategy’ of selling the GOP to tribalists from secession states….

  34. Pierce R. Butler says

    From 1890-1920, the Germans.

    I don’t think many Germans came to the US in 1917-18 or for some years after, except maybe a few would-be saboteurs smuggled in by rowboat.

    I know, I know – Pat Buchanan lined up his last fact-checkers against the wall and shot ‘em decades ago.

  35. hackerguitar says

    I’m gobsmacked that he used – of all people – Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee as exemplars who, according to his lights, *belong* in a pantheon.

    Really? Army officers who resigned their commissions and treasonously took up arms against the nation they’d sworn to protect, in the name of retaining slavery?

    Even for Pat, this is over the top. He’s pandering to his base of racist old white republicans, and he doesn’t seem to know or care that anyone else is listening. Wow….

  36. stagamancer says

    We are from every continent and country. Nearly 4 in 10 Americans trace their ancestry to Asia, Africa and Latin America. We are a multiracial, multilingual, multicultural society in a world where countless countries are being torn apart over race, religion and roots.

    Funny. Reading this sentence made me feel really good about America.

  37. colnago80 says

    Re hackerguitar @ #35

    Actually, Jackson left the army in 1851 so he did not resign his commission. Lee did, after being offered command of all Union troops by Commanding General Winfield Scott in 1861.

  38. dugglebogey says

    In this country, we have another name for naturalized immigrants. We call them “Americans.”

    Another conservative that loves “America” but hates “Americans.”

  39. Ragutis says

    I’m pretty sure 10 out of 10 Americans can trace their ancestry back to Africa.

  40. dingojack says

    Nope, some can trace their ancestry to Homo neanderthalensis (developed in central Asia/Europe) and some from the Denisovians (Northern Asia)* — well at least partially.
    :) Dingo
    ———-
    * more controversially H. Erectus and H. floresiensis, and etc.

  41. greg1466 says

    The only possible way you could make the claim that “white” people have ever been the majority in North America is if you completely ignore all of the Native Americans and slaves…oh, right.

  42. Paul Neubauer says

    @Ragutis #39:

    I’m pretty sure 10 out of 10 Americans can trace their ancestry back to Africa.

    I can’t trace my ancestry back to Africa. I’m pretty sure (in fact quite certain) that if I could go back far enough, all my (human) ancestors ultimately come from Africa, but I can’t trace them back to Africa.

  43. OldEd says

    Just another quibble: that “No Irish Need Apply” story appears to be what we now call an urban myth. There are vast hoards of artifacts from the late 1800’s and early 1900’s – the era in which the “NONI” sign was supposedly all over the place, and rampant in the newspaper help wanted ads.

    Not one single “NONI” sign has ever been found (that wasn’t an obvious recent forgery: modern paper, modern typeface, modern ink, etc.). Not one “Help Wanted” ad in the newspapers from that era has ever been found.

    This canard has been debunked several times by reputable historians in NYC – my “home town”.

    It is true that there was a glut of unskilled labor, and it is probably true that people were turned away from companies with “Help Wanted” signs in the window, but that certainly was because the applicant was unskilled and looking for a skilled job for which he was unqualified.

  44. says

    Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee are out of the pantheon.

    Wrong as always. Last I checked, they were still in, at least as capable generals.

  45. says

    @44:

    Colnago80 will be along if he sees that.

    Before he gets here; both Jackson and Lee were reasonably good commanders but they were both less competent then the history taught about them would lead one to believe.

  46. colnago80 says

    Re dingojack @ #40

    It is true that Neanderthals contributed to the genomes of modern humans, at least in Europe. However, this was accomplished via interbreeding with Cro-Magnons. Homo Sapiens did not evolve from Neanderthals, they evolved from Homo Erectus in Africa. They were already Homo Sapiens when they left Africa. The last scientist to cling to the belief that humans evolved from Neanderthals was Milton Wolpoff, now considered a crank.

  47. freehand says

    Ragutis: I’m pretty sure 10 out of 10 Americans can trace their ancestry back to Africa.
    .
    While ten of ten can, at most eight of ten are willing to.

  48. says

    @47:

    But of those “eight of ten”, some percentage will only believe it’s true if they see the Genealogy Chart and not some easily forged “Chart of Genealogy”. Checkmate, monkeylovers!

Leave a Reply