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Marco Rubio vs Reality

As Marco Rubio attempts to make a comeback from plummeting poll numbers that have all but destroyed his once-promising presidential potential, he’s taking on the demon weed. In an interview with Yahoo News, he said that there is no “responsible way to recreationally use marijuana.”

The Florida Republican senator was asked about any past marijuana use during an interview with Yahoo! News, but the possible 2016 presidential candidate blew off the question.

“Here’s the problem with that question in American politics: If you say that you did and suddenly there are people out there saying, ‘Well, it’s not a big deal. Look at all these successful people who did it,'” Rubio said.

“I don’t want my kids to smoke marijuana,” he said. “And I don’t want other people’s kids to smoke marijuana. I don’t believe there’s a responsible way to recreationally use marijuana.”

“On the other side of it, if you tell people you didn’t they won’t believe you,” he added.

Millions and millions of American smoke pot and the overwhelming majority of them do so responsibly. They go to work, raise their children, pay their bills and are productive citizens. Rubio’s problem here is with reality, not with marijuana.

Comments

  1. StevoR : Free West Papua, free Tibet, let the Chagossians return! says

    Yep. My moneys on reality not Rubio.

  2. StevoR : Free West Papua, free Tibet, let the Chagossians return! says

    In fact Rubio’s so far divorced from reality that I’m wondering what he’s smoking! ;-)

  3. raven says

    he said that there is no “responsible way to recreationally use marijuana.”

    Something like 20 states have legalized medical marijuana. Many states have decriminalized marijuana and for decades. It’s now legal in two states.

    And none of the creeping legalization measures have had any noticeable deleterious effects. They have had many positive effects on an individual and society level. Less police time and jail time for users etc..

    Rubio is a demogogue. What he really believes if anything is unknown.

  4. Al Dente says

    Sure, Rubio, it’s the ebil weed that causes your problems, not the flip-flopping on AGW, the political cronyism, or the dislike you suffer from Latinos.

    Rubio is a Cuban-American Republican. Most Latinos are Mexican-Americans or Puerto Ricans, two groups who don’t identify with Cubans. Non-Cuban Latinos have been Democrats for a long time because they perceive that Democrats have been on their side on many issues beyond immigration, all the way back to Bobby Kennedy on the grape strike. By contrast, except for Shrub’s attempt at immigration reform, the GOP hasn’t cared a rat’s ass about Latino issues. And it was George W’s fellow Republicans who doomed his bill.

  5. bahrfeldt says

    Both Rubio and reality are losers in this matters. The reality is that the main danger for both adolescents and adults, primarily for the poor and working class and disproportionately for minorities, is that they continue to be harassed, searched, arrested and punished for simple possession. The rights of youth to be secure from arbitrary and capricious search is generally ignored in school and in public.

  6. D. C. Sessions says

    And none of the creeping legalization measures have had any noticeable deleterious effects. [...] Less police time and jail time for users etc..

    You’re contradicting yourself.

  7. chisaihana5219 says

    If this were true, then there is no responsible way to recreationally use beer either. I can tell that by the number of DWI arrests in my city, county and state. Wonder if he’d agree?

  8. karmacat says

    Marijuana probably not as bad as alcohol in some ways but it still has some harmful effects on cognition and motivation. It is addictive and It lasts a long time in one’s body so I wonder how it affects the brain in the long term. I agree it should be decriminalized. I’m not so sure it should be legalized. Although if it is legalized it can be studied more and regulated more

  9. says

    The rights of youth to be secure from arbitrary and capricious search is generally ignored in school and in public.

    I get your point, but do remember the so-called random (arbitrary and capricious) drug test at work. My favorite part is “please empty your pockets” said by a self-entitled health care bully.

    The piss-off is that the tests are selective for pot smokers. Unlike pot, do blow or meth on Friday night, the shit will be out of your system for a Tuesday whiz-quiz.

    The plutocrats well remember that the advent of widespread pot smoking led to their authority being questioned. It’s no coincidence it was the vile and condescending Ronny the Plutarc that declared a “War on Drugs”.

    ‘America the free’ my ass.

  10. matty1 says

    @8 The problem with decriminalisation is it can leave the supply in the hands of criminal gangs who resort to violence to solve their disputes because their product is not legal enough to enforce a contract in court. It’s essentially the same problem as alcohol under prohibition and is only solved by full legalisation complete with regulation.

    For the record I favour the same for all drugs and for much the same reason. The harm increase in harm that may be done by people getting addicted to legal methamphetamine is outweighed by the harm being done by people committing other crimes as a result of it’s illegal status.

  11. garnetstar says

    If Rubio actually truly believed that, why not say “Yeah, I smoked weed, and it was a huge mistake. I suffered consequences which perhaps did not derail my brilliant career, but could have, and were serious. I’m warning everyone not to do it.” Etc. Parents say that sort of thing to their kids all the time.

    It’s because Rubio’s never had a conviction or a belief that he wasn’t willing to lie about to court the RWNJs. In fact, he seems never to have formed any convictions or beliefs at all.

  12. rabbitscribe says

    Even if he’s right, so what? Everything irresponsible should be criminalized? What’s the penalty for failure to floss and use sunscreen?

  13. lofgren says

    The problem with decriminalisation is it can leave the supply in the hands of criminal gangs who resort to violence to solve their disputes because their product is not legal enough to enforce a contract in court.

    There is also what I call the “pasties” problem. I named it after an article I read recently about how strippers in Richmond VA are required to wear pasties but they routinely don’t because the only people who really give a shit whether or not strippers wear pasties don’t go to strip clubs.

    There is a similar problem with drugs. If there is a kink in an illegal supply chain, a contract that needs to be enforced or a bad batch or whatever, then everybody involved still has more motivation to keep quiet about the situation than they do to solve the problem. If drugs were legal, then at the very least the consumers would have an incentive to ensure that they were as safe as possible and properly regulated, and the dealers would have an incentive to ensure that consumers used the product safely in order to avoid moral outrage.

    You can’t really stop people from committing crimes with laws, but you can change the shape of the crime to minimize harm.

  14. Ichthyic says

    except for Shrub’s attempt at immigration reform,

    that reform was driven by businesses looking to extend the rules changes to allow for importing cheaper labor into the tech industry.

    I saw that happening everywhere in Silicon Valley in the 90s.

    they didn’t give a flying FUCK about the immigrants themselves, and there was absolutely no support network in place for the imported laborers once their job terms ended. they were simply expected to leave.

    if that’s immigration “reform”, then what the Reagan administration did with deregulation of the banking industry in the 80s was “reform”.

  15. Ichthyic says

    Marijuana probably not as bad as alcohol in some ways but it still has some harmful effects on cognition and motivation. It is addictive and It lasts a long time in one’s body so I wonder how it affects the brain in the long term. I agree it should be decriminalized. I’m not so sure it should be legalized. Although if it is legalized it can be studied more and regulated more

    you clearly do not know enough about marijuana.

    I’ll start you on the road to knowledge with a very conservative, but at least knowlege based, article on the subject:

    http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/almost-addicted/201311/is-marijuana-addictive

    note:

    Obviously, the vast majority of marijuana users are neither addicted nor almost addicted to cannabis. Their use doesn’t escalate over time, they can enjoy its effects without endangering some major element of their lives.

    so if the VAST majority of users of marijuana are not addicted to it… how does it qualify as a flat-labled addictive substance in your mind?

    looking at the numbers, and even the definitions used in the article, aspirin is no more addictive than marijuana is.

  16. lpetrich says

    Marco Rubio could be trying to get the anti-pot vote. There are still a lot of people who believe that marijuana is a Bad Thing.

  17. dugglebogey says

    Notice he didn’t say he hadn’t used it.

    He said nobody would believe him if he claimed it. Not to mention that how would he know how dangerous it is, so much so that it’s impossible to use it responsibly, unless he had tried it? Riddle me that, Batman!

    I am 100% for marijuana legalization. And I have never smoked pot before in my life. I guess that makes me the polar opposite of Mr. Rubio.

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