Oh Boy, Phase II of Operation American Spring »« ACLJ: Muslim Blasphemy Laws Bad, Christian Blasphemy Laws Good

D’Souza Pleads Guilty

Dinesh D’Souza, after denying he’d done anything wrong and blaming it all on a vendetta against him. pleaded guilty on Tuesday to violating campaign finance laws by making straw donations in the name of other people. The Worldnetdaily calls this a “courtroom shocker,” but it was inevitable.

Filmmaker Dinesh D’Souza, whose movie “2016: Obama’s America” rocked the 2012 presidential election campaign, pleaded guilty Tuesday to a charge that involves two instances of illegal campaign contributions.

In a hearing before U.S. District Judge Richard Berman that lasted just under an hour, he admitted reimbursing friends for making contributions to Wendy Long’s U.S. Senate campaign in 2012.

He confirmed that he reimbursed two friends $10,000 in cash for their contributions to the campaign. The federal limit for individuals making contributions was $5,000.

The plea bargain had been expected. In a statement announcing the Tuesday hearing, the U.S. attorney’s office used language “that typically indicates that a plea is expected to occur,” according to a New York Times analysis…

In a statement released by his attorney, Benjamin Brafman, D’Souza said he was accepting responsibility for “having urged two close associates to make contributions” to the unsuccessful campaign and then reimbursing them.

The statement said that because of the “technical nature” of the charges, there was no “viable defense.”

Of course there was no viable defense — he did it. There was no question that he did it and no question that it was illegal. This was the inevitable result, that he would plead guilty and almost certainly get a fine and probation. The maximum sentence was 5 years in prison, but that was never going to happen. But it does look like a jail term may be a possibility.

“I did reimburse them,” D’Souza told U.S. District Judge Richard M. Berman. “I knew that causing a campaign contribution to be made in the name of another was wrong and something the law forbids. I deeply regret my conduct.”

A plea agreement D’Souza signed calls for him not to challenge any sentence within the range of 10 months to 16 months.

His attorney, Benjamin Brafman, said in a statement immediately after the plea that he was hopeful that the judge “will recognize Mr. D’Souza to be a fundamentally honorable man who should not be imprisoned for what was an isolated instance of wrongdoing in an otherwise productive life.” Sentencing was set for Sept. 23.

This will be interesting to watch. And as much as I despise D’Souza, I’d be okay with a fine and probation. A jail term seems like too much to me for such a small potatoes violation. We’re talking $10,000 in a campaign that cost millions.

Comments

  1. dshetty says

    will recognize Mr. D’Souza to be a fundamentally honorable man
    If this is the determining factor, D’souza is in for 16 months.

  2. Alverant says

    He needs jail time to serve as an example and to show that being rich no longer gets you off the hook. Plus it may just teach him about how badly prison reform is needed.

  3. says

    Filmmaker Dinesh D’Souza, whose movie “2016: Obama’s America” rocked the 2012 presidential election campaign

    Is there a new meaning of “rocked” equivalent to “was mostly ignored”? Sort of like “Operation American Spring rocked the federal government”?

  4. zmidponk says

    @dshetty

    You’re forgetting – just because someone is recognised as a fundamentally honourable man, this doesn’t mean they actually are.

  5. says

    will recognize Mr. D’Souza to be a fundamentally honorable man who should not be imprisoned for what was an isolated instance of wrongdoing in an otherwise productive life

    Translation: Don’t put him in jail, he’s got a family and a mistress to support.

  6. D. C. Sessions says

    A plea agreement D’Souza signed calls for him not to challenge any sentence within the range of 10 months to 16 months.

    So if he gets probation (or six months, or anything under 10 months) he can challenge it?

    In most instances this would be a silly idea, but in his I can just see ideology (and some hefty backers) deciding him to do just that.

  7. doublereed says

    I just googled d’souza, and it popped up with “Dinesh Joseph D’Souza is a political commentator, filmmaker, felon, and author.”

  8. John Pieret says

    We’re talking $10,000 in a campaign that cost millions.

    And it wasn’t like a conservative Republican had a chance in New York in a presidential election year. As far as buying influence, D’Souza was just throwing his money away. I seem to remember reading somewhere that Long was a personal friend of D’Souza’s.

  9. eric says

    A plea agreement D’Souza signed calls for him not to challenge any sentence within the range of 10 months to 16 months.

    Hmmm…the only sensible way to interpret that is if the minimum jail sentence is 10 months. If the judge were free to sentence him to 1 month, wouldn’t it read “1 month to 16 months” instead?

  10. mikeyb says

    For some reason, this story reminds me of a line from the movie Citizen Kane:

    “You’re the greatest fool I’ve ever known, Kane. If it was anybody else, I’d say what’s going to happen to you would be a lesson to you. Only you’re going to need more than one lesson. And you’re going to get more than one lesson.”

  11. Jared Ragland says

    In a life devoid of touch with reality, D’Souza finally seems to have met someone who can get him to understand that other people do matter.

    (his lawyer)

  12. Steve Morrison says

    Oh, come on: D’Souze is an honorable man. Indeed, so are they all; all honorable men—

  13. felidae says

    Some jail time will turn him into another conservative advocating prison reform like Milliken, Abramoff and Dickie Nixon’s crew of sociopaths

  14. says

    I love the comments over at WND. Apparently Obama was so angry about a documentary that didn’t cost him the election or cause him any trouble at all that he made D’Souza commit a felony and then personally directed a prosecutor to file completely legal and reasonable charges that D’Ouchebag admitted to being guilty of. Everything is a conspiracy!

  15. bushrat says

    …will recognize Mr. D’Souza to be a fundamentally honorable man who should not be imprisoned for what was an isolated instance of wrongdoing in an otherwise productive life.

    Ahahahaha…Oh, you’re serious, let me laugh louder. AAAAAAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!

  16. dingojack says

    Zero (#3) – by ‘rocked’ I think they mean ‘curled up in foetal position, clutching their aching sides due to being convulsed with laughter at a piece of unintentionally hilarious schlock filmmaking that did for politics what Reefer Madness did for dope smoking’.
    Dingo

  17. says

    “And as much as I despise D’Souza, I’d be okay with a fine and probation. A jail term seems like too much to me for such a small potatoes violation. We’re talking $10,000 in a campaign that cost millions.”

    Fuck him, he’s a piece-of-shit who’s made a very comfortable living demonizing others and taking the coin of the ReiKKKwing–he needs to suffer.

  18. Doc Bill says

    The shorter D’Souza: “I deeply regret getting caught.”

    The somewhat longer D’Souza: “I also deeply regret sticking my dick deeply into my mistress while being married.”

    The complete D’Souza: “I deeply regret being a hypocritical fool! Ha, ha, fooled you!”

  19. sigurd jorsalfar says

    @15 Improbable Joe – And Obama’s got everyone, wingnuts included, off the topic of Benghazi. Well played, Obama. Well played.

  20. had3 says

    Gregory @ 13: under fed sentencing guidelines, his “acceptance” of responsibility lowers his guideline range from 15-21 months to 10-16 months. He probably figured saying “no contest” wasn’t worth potentially 5 months of his life in prison.

  21. says

    A jail term seems like too much to me for such a small potatoes violation. We’re talking $10,000 in a campaign that cost millions.

    I hope he gets the chair. A comfy chair, but one with a spring that’s loose and digs into a cheek once he gets comfortable.
    And also I hope that when he sees himself in the mirror he sees himself. That’s the worst punishment of all. I mean, imagine waking up every day and realizing you’r Dinesh D’souza. Shit like that has driven stronger men than him mad. Weaker men, too. And men of similar strength.

     
    Alverant “He needs jail time to serve as an example and to show that being rich no longer gets you off the hook.”
    Now you’re just being ridiculous. He’s not rich. He’s not poor, but he’s not rich. Being a horrible person who serves the interests of even more horrible people only pays well if you’re at the top. For the rest, it pays okay. It’s about as close as they get to Meritocracy.

  22. bahrfeldt says

    @8- “And it wasn’t like a conservative Republican had a chance in New York in a presidential election year”. Peter King?

  23. says

    “It’s about as close as they get to Meritocracy.”

    I think it’s more like “Merdeotocracy*”

    * (TM) (Sm) (c) 2014 democommie media and ministries, LLC, LSD & PCP–Not to be confused with democommie ministries and media, PCP, LSD & LaLaLa.

  24. anteprepro says

    For those who might feel bad for Dinesh, here are some of his greatest hits, per wikipedia:

    While at Dartmouth, D’Souza became the editor of a conservative monthly called The Prospect. The paper and its writers ignited much controversy during D’Souza’s editorship by, among other things, criticizing the College’s affirmative action policies….

    After his time in Dartmouth, D’Souza moved to Washington, D.C., where he served from 1985 to 1987 as an editor of Policy Review, a conservative journal then published by the Heritage Foundation….

    In 1988 D’Souza left the magazine to serve as an advisor in Ronald Reagan’s White House….

    He has attributed many modern social problems to what he calls the “cultural left”. In his recent book The Enemy at Home: The Cultural Left and Its Responsibility for 9/11, he wrote that:

    “The cultural left in this country is responsible for causing 9/11 … the cultural left and its allies in Congress, the media, Hollywood, the non-profit sector and the universities are the primary cause of the volcano of anger toward America that is erupting from the Islamic world.[29]“…..

    In the second chapter of What’s So Great About America, D’Souza defends colonialism, arguing that the problem with Africa is not that it was colonized, but rather that it was not colonized long enough. He supports the European colonization of India and other countries, claiming that Christian colonization was a good thing for India because it was a way for Indians to escape the caste system, superstitions and poverty.

    Dinesh has argued that the Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse scandal was a result of “the sexual immodesty of liberal America”. He further asserted that the conditions of prisoners at Abu Ghraib “are comparable to the accommodations in midlevel Middle Eastern hotels”….

    Articles written by Dinesh D’Souza include:

    “Atheism, not religion, is the real force behind the mass murders of history”
    “Atheism and Child Murder”……

    To say nothing of the fact that, even if it was a campaign where millions of dollars were spent, Dinesh was clearly just trying to throw his money around to influence politics, because he is entitled, rich blowhard who thinks he is above the law and that his money should give him a bigger say in those laws for the lesser peons. I think he deserves to be slapped down as hard as possible for this minor crime, because he is a fucking horrible human being who will probably find a way to worm his way out of punishment anyway.

  25. anteprepro says

    Now you’re just being ridiculous. He’s not rich. He’s not poor, but he’s not rich.

    His movie grossed 30 million. He has had several New York Times bestsellers. He has made god knows how many television appearances and has had quite a few speaking gigs that I am sure he has been well compensated for. Dinesh lived in Fairbanks Ranch, California, which is basically just gated communities where the median household income is 200k.

    All signs point to “rich”. If you have evidence to the contrary, I’m sure we would all love to see it. It might restore our faith in humanity.

  26. says

    @31:

    I’m fairly certain that Modusoperandi is talking “rich” as in:

    “Rich, fuck yes, I’m Rich; RICH enough to faceshoot you or rip off your head and shit down your neckhole, get videotaped doing same and STILL sleep in my own bed for the rest of my life.”

    D’ouchenozzle ain’t there and, now, it’s probable that his country club committee will discover his “wogness” and find a way to cut him loose.

    “Slumlord Millionaire” might have a second life. They can film it in reverse and have him wind up on the streets of Goa with his begging bowl.

Leave a Reply