Markell: Hitler, Hitler, Hitler…and Yoga?


The Worldnetdaily has produced a movie called Trapped in Hitler’s Hell, which features a Holocaust survivor named Anita Dittman and her “miraculous story of God’s overwhelming providence that preserved her life despite brutal Nazi persecution.” Really? God showed overwhelming providence to you, but screw the millions of other people? Do you really think you’re that special? Anyway, Jan Markell, a bizarre end-times preacher, is using that film to claim that yoga will turn America into Nazi Germany 2.

The state of America’s churches also concerns Dittman, who said German churches fell away from the Bible before Hitler came into power.

She said many American churches are likewise walking away from the truth of Scripture, turning from biblical truths and opening the door to deception.

“That’s how Hitler got into the churches,” she warned.

Conference host Olive Tree Ministries Director Jan Markell agreed.

She also cited comparisons between Nazi Germany and America, including the country adopting socialized medicine, banning prayer from school and a growing fascination with mystical spirituality.

Markell said Hitler was fascinated with mysticism, because “he knew it would crumble the Christian faith.” She warned that Christian churches in America are likewise trying spiritual traps such as walking the labyrinth, “Christian” yoga and contemplative prayer.

I just don’t think there’s a bottom on how ridiculous these people can be. It’s stupid all the way down.

Comments

  1. John Pieret says

    contemplative prayer

    Uncontemplative prayer is so much better. Just mouth the words and you’re saved. No muss, no fuss.

  2. brucegee1962 says

    Butbut…

    Contemplative prayer sounds a little bit like meditation. Which is well known to be practiced by them there foreigners. Who are, of course, evil servants of Satan. Ipso facto qed.

  3. eric says

    Its xenophobia all the way down. Anything they don’t remember granddaddy doing, and anything being done by people who look different, must be evil.

  4. Evan Brehm says

    “She also cited comparisons between Nazi Germany and America, including the country adopting socialized medicine, banning prayer from school and a growing fascination with mystical spirituality.”

    Germany had socialized medicine decades before Hitler rose to power, America does not yet have socialized medicine.

    Neither America nor Nazi Germany have banned prayer from school.

    There’s a difference between Americans being interested in mystical spiritualism and the Nazis. Americans do it in their personal lives (yoga, as well as in fantasy games such as D & D). The Nazis were interested in old Norse Paganism and applied it to their laws and government.

    So, she got 0.5 out of 3 right. Not bad for a WorldNetDaily columnist.

  5. Doug Little says

    That’s how Hitler got into the churches,

    Really? I thought he walked through the front door like everybody else.

  6. brucegee1962 says

    Also, there was arguably a lot more interest in magic and spiritualism in America, at least among the educated elite, back in 1900 than there is today. I think to really make it back to “the good old days” for these people, you’d have to go back to at least the 1850s.

  7. Doug Little says

    Weren’t the Nazis interested in mysticism because they thought that it might give them an advantage in the war, or have I been watching too many Indiana Jones movies.

  8. blf says

    Anything they don’t remember granddaddy doing, and anything being done by people who look different, must be evil.

    A person, and the ideas she/he says (unless you agree with them), are also evil if the person “sounds different”. For instance, speaks something other than (or in addition to) EnglishUSpeakian. Or who knows, and knows how to use, words with more than one or two syllables or “many” letters.

    A person and her/his ideas-you-don’t-agree-with must also be evil if the person supports something you don’t, like Same Sex Marriage or Abortion or Gun Control or…

    A person and her/his ideas-you-don’t-agree-with must also be evil if the person knows what evidence is and how to use it properly (and thus tends to accept claims you don’t, such as AGW or Evolution or Vaccines or…

    A person and her/his ideas-you-don’t-agree-with must also be evil if the person believes in different great magic sky faeries then you do, or even worse, none — GASP! — at all.

  9. tfkreference says

    “Hitler loved dogs. Americans love dogs. Americans are Hitler.”

    And the best yoga position to use as a punchline is the downward dog, so the circle is complete.

  10. Richard Smith says

    Makes perfect sense. Some of those yoga poses have your arms and legs all tangled into nazis…

  11. coragyps says

    “a growing fascination with mystical spirituality.”

    They weren’t around for 1970, I guess…..

  12. sugarfrosted says

    You know who else was fascinated with “mystical spirituality”? The Jews, wait a minute…
    (Well, it was Jewish mysticism, but still.)

  13. Pierce R. Butler says

    … spiritual traps such as walking the labyrinth…

    Quite so: neither Theseus nor the Minotaur ever prayed properly to Jesus!

    No, really – does anybody have a clue wtf Markell means by that?

  14. Richard Smith says

    @Pierce R. Butler (#15)

    … spiritual traps such as walking the labyrinth…

    No, really – does anybody have a clue wtf Markell means by that?

    Like following the path on the floor in that pagan temple to sacreligious heathen rituals, Chartres Cathedral. It was installed there only recently, of course, as it’s not something Real Christians would have been into back in the day…

  15. busterggi says

    Hmmm…slicked down black hair…mustache…does yoga…

    that’s not Hitler, you’re thinking of Gomez Addams!

  16. Alverant says

    So the fact that the Nazis were conservative christians will be completely unmentioned in this propaganda piece I assume.

  17. thinkfree83 says

    Hitler’s religious beliefs are rather complicated. He grew up in a conventional Catholic home in Austria, but stopped receiving the sacraments as a young man. He disliked the Catholic church and Christianity in general, because he thought that it was a weak, effeminate, and “Jewish” religion that was unbecoming Germans. However, Hitler recognized that the churches were important institutions and he knew how to use religion to advance his goals. For example, he skillfully used the antisemitic rhetoric of Martin Luther to cast himself and the Nazi Party as the final link in a long chain of German Christian antisemitism, which made prejudice “respectable” in the eyes of those who were turned off by the more thuggish manifestations of anti-Jewish violence.

    As a mature man, Hitler had a very clear sense of Providence, that he was guided by God to rebuild Germany and purge Europe of Jews, which would make him a theist, albeit one who thought that divine favor revolved around himself. While there was a general interest in Norse religion in early 20th century Germany, its influence on Hitler and the Nazi Party has been highly exaggerated. The only leading Nazi who was really into neopaganism was Heinrich Himmler, and it is unclear if Himmler would have been able to put his ideas into practice if Germany had won the war. The 1939 German census indicates that 54 percent of Germans self-identfied as Protestant, 40 percent as Catholic, 3.5 percent as neopagan, and 1.5 percent as unbelievers. Both the Catholic church and the various Protestant denominations remained official state church during the Nazi era. In fact, German Protestant clergymen were actually miffed that Hitler didn’t try to include them more in the apparatuses of state. After the war, there was only a half-hearted de-Nazification of the Germany theological departments and churches, and many cheerleaders for the Nazis kept their cushy academic jobs. To this day, the full extent of the churches’ role in the Third Reich is not entirely known.

  18. sigurd jorsalfar says

    Really? God showed overwhelming providence to you, but screw the millions of other people? Do you really think you’re that special?

    Yep. Anne Frank would have got away clean if only she hadn’t touched herself the night before the Gestapo came looking for her family.

  19. sigurd jorsalfar says

    @20 thinkfree, I think that’s a very good assessment of the situation. It accords with what I’ve read on the subject. I’ve read that Hitler talked in private about the need to ‘settle accounts’ with the christian churches, especially the Roman Catholic Church after the war. He saw them as too entrenched and too powerful to deal with until he achieved his war aims, so for the time being he was happy to use them rather than to oppose them.

  20. gardengnome says

    sigurd jorsalfar

    “@20 thinkfree, I think that’s a very good assessment of the situation. It accords with what I’ve read on the subject. I’ve read that Hitler talked in private about the need to ‘settle accounts’ with the christian churches, especially the Roman Catholic Church after the war. He saw them as too entrenched and too powerful to deal with until he achieved his war aims, so for the time being he was happy to use them rather than to oppose them.”

    I daresay the churches were happy to be used too, being anxious to protect their massive property holdings in Germany, particularly the Vatican.

  21. says

    It’s funny how single mindedly obsessed these folks are about Hitler. How come they never accuse the “leftist” du jour of trying to turn America into another Fascist Italy or Imperial Japan?

  22. says

    I really should have noted that they never talk about us turning into a Scandanavian Socialist Dystopia either.

    Lutefisk, considered a WMD in many countries is the Nordic contribution to the list of WTF ethnic dishes like Kimchee, 100 year eggs, chitlins, haggis, Lamb fries and Rocky Mountain Oysters.

  23. colnago80 says

    Re thinkfree83 @ #20

    He disliked the Catholic church and Christianity in general, because he thought that it was a weak, effeminate, and “Jewish” religion that was unbecoming Germans.

    Further, he once told Albert Speer that he thought that Shintoism would have been a better choice of religion for Germany because of his admiration for the Bushido; he considered Christianity an effete philosophy, unsuited for a warlike people like Germans.

  24. Nick Gotts says

    I daresay the churches were happy to be used too, being anxious to protect their massive property holdings in Germany, particularly the Vatican. – gardengnome@24

    The Vatican’s in Germany???

    Seriously, yes thinkfree83@20 has it right – I get almost as tired of atheists claiming Hitler was a Christian as I do of Christians claiming he was an atheist. Of course the vast majority of those who followed his orders for aggressive war and genocide were Christians. Hitler drew extensively on south German Catholic nationalism in the period up to 1923 (see Derek Hastings, Catholicism and the Roots of Nazism) but thereafter adjusted his rhetoric to appeal to Lutherans as well as Catholics. The contents of his private library (Timothy W. Ryback, Hitler’s Private Library: The Books that Shaped his Life) do indicate a sustained interest in spirituality and the occult, but not in Germanic neopaganism.

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