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Kevin Trudeau Gets 10 Years in Prison

Kevin Trudeau, the con man who sold fake diets to people and made tens of millions of dollars doing it, has been sentenced to 10 years in prison for criminal contempt for failing to comply with earlier punishments for the fraud he carried out on vast numbers of people.

Chicago-based TV pitchman Kevin Trudeau was sentenced to 10 years in prison today for repeatedly defying court orders to pay a whopping $37 million fine over his fraudulent infomercials.

Trudeau, 51, smiled slightly as U.S. District Judge Ronald Guzman imposed the sentence. The judge called him “deceitful to the very core.”…

In a court filing last week, prosecutors ripped the infomercial king for what they called his “brazen defiance” of federal judges in Chicago over the past decade and accused him of preying on the sick, the poor and the insecure over three decades of fraud and deceit.

Trudeau has been jailed since Nov. 12 when he was convicted by a federal jury of criminal contempt for lying in infomercials about the contents of his weight loss book that called for punishing calorie restrictions and a crippling list of food restrictions.

Prosecutors said Trudeau has made no payments toward the $37 million fine imposed by the Federal Trade Commission despite continuing to live a lavish lifestyle. Between mid-2010 and March 2013, Trudeau spent at least $12 million on first-class airfare, gym memberships, trips to the salon, $12,000 cuff links, a six-figure Bentley automobile and a mansion in Oak Brook and a California residence that cost a combined $15,500 a month, according to the filing…

Trudeau “preys upon the sick who want to be made healthy, the poor who want to become rich, and the insecure who want to feel better about themselves,” prosecutors wrote in the filing.

Trudeau made one big mistake. He should have called it The Jesus Diet and put in a bunch of religious language. Then his fraud would have been legally protected.

Comments

  1. jba55 says

    I wonder if I can interest him in my new book, “How to Survive the Yard: 10 Secrets THEY Don’t Want You to Know!”

  2. dingojack says

    jba55 – sounds like the click-bait above*.
    :) Dingo
    ———–
    * eg ‘The top 39 menu items you can order from popular restaurants’. (Obviously they stole a menu from a few local fast-food joints then randomly chose 13 items from each menu. Must of taken them – minutes).

  3. cry4turtles says

    I agree Trudeau is a fraud; however, I purchased one of his books in 05. It was difficult if not impossible to read ( repetitive due to lack of editors?), but it did prompt me to research soda. What I learned convinced me to never touch the stuff again.

  4. leftwingfox says

    The “wonderful” thing about conspiracy-based fraud: prosecution for fraud becomes validation of the conspiracy.

  5. Alverant says

    Robert Half Technology once sent me out to interview at one of his companies a few years ago. At the interview they talked about the “Law of Attraction” and the website bragged that it would put members in contact with the Illuminati and “the Brotherhood”. It was hard for me not to LOL. It was also outside the limits I set in terms of length of commute and RHT knew it. It was my last interview with that company.

  6. says

    Trudeau likely won’t have to worry about an income when he gets out. He’ll just work the martyrdom angle and continue to fleece the same suckers.

  7. Sastra says

    Kevin Trudeau appealed to the romantic ideal of the lone and brave individual fighting against an overwhelming enemy, discovering and using the hidden secrets of nature. The only thing that slightly surprises me is how obviously dishonest he was. It’s so easy to fall for one’s own bullshit — particularly this kind — but Kevin apparently never did. No, he didn’t delude himself, he really was and remained a con man. There’s almost a bit of integrity in that. Almost.

  8. Pierce R. Butler says

    Trudeau, 51, smiled slightly as U.S. District Judge Ronald Guzman imposed the sentence.

    Maybe he had expected 30 years?

  9. dingojack says

    Sastra – “The only thing that slightly surprises me is how obviously dishonest he was. It’s so easy to fall for one’s own bullshit — particularly this kind — but Kevin apparently never did. No, he didn’t delude himself, he really was and remained a con man. ”

    I’m curious, how did you come to this conclusion?*

    Dingo
    ——–
    * not that I have any special insight into such matters, but it seems that ‘believing our own hype’ is a trap that almost all of us fall into at one time or another (Proverbially, conmen are so used to using lies as truths they start to believe in them eventually).

  10. says

    Ed said:

    Trudeau made one big mistake. He should have called it The Jesus Diet and put in a bunch of religious language. Then his fraud would have been legally protected.

    I know this was an off-the-cuff remark, Ed, but…..damn would I like to hear you expound on this!

  11. says

    OT
    @5 Alverant

    RHT sent me to an interview that was WAY outside my commute. Then the company offered me a job. 2 years later, I’m still commuting. Damn you RHT for getting me a good job (and damn my landlord for charging such low rent that I refuse to move).

  12. Pieter B, FCD says

    Pierce R Butler wrote:

    Maybe he had expected 30 years?

    I had read that 20 years was a possibility, and was surprised that the judge didn’t throw the book at him given his expressed contempt for Trudeau’s entire crooked life.

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