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Mar 11 2014

Another Case of Law Enforcement Rape

We’ve seen multiple cases of rape with a badge in New Mexico and elsewhere lately, with the police forcing people to undergo invasive body cavity searches in a futile search for drugs. Here’s another such case, but this one is by Customs and Border Protection:

According to the complaint, which received renewed attention this past weekend after being featured on the public radio show “On the Media,” the plaintiff is a 54-year-old woman from New Mexico who traveled to Ciudad Juárez in December 2012 to visit a close family friend who had been deported. The plaintiff, a U.S. citizen, asked the court to proceed anonymously due to the “highly personal and sensitive nature of the events.”

When the woman returned to the United States through the port of entry at El Paso, Texas, border officials randomly selected her for further screening, the lawsuit says. While she was in line, a drug dog lunged at her, leading authorities to believe she was carrying drugs.

They then began a series of invasive cavity searches, the suit alleges. When those exams revealed nothing, authorities sent the plaintiff, referred to in the suit as “Jane Doe,” to the University Medical Center of El Paso for more.

The complaint says this:

Over the course of the next six hours, Defendants subjected Ms. Doe to a series of highly invasive searches, any one of which would have been humiliating and demeaning. First, government agents stripped searched [sic] Ms. Doe and made a visual and manual inspection of her genitals and anus. Finding nothing, Defendants next subjected her to an observed bowel movement. When that procedure yielded no evidence of drugs, Defendants X-rayed Ms. Doe. Having found nothing, Defendants next shackled Ms. Doe to an examining table and inserted a speculum into her vagina, performed a rectal exam on her, and conducted a bimanual cavity search of her vagina. Still not satisfied, Defendants subjected Ms. Doe to a CT scan and again found no evidence of drugs.

Though Defendants conducted these searches against the will of Ms. Doe and without her consent, the Medical Center billed Ms. Doe more than $5,000.00 for its “services.”

This is sexual assault. Period. And they sent her a fucking bill for it! I wanted to scream “unbelievable” but it’s all too believable these days. Our criminal justice system is totally out of control. To make things worse, her odds of getting any justice are dramatically reduced by the fact that this was done by customs because the courts have ruled that the 4th Amendment is essentially null and void within 100 miles of a controlled border.

14 comments

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  1. 1
    cry4turtles

    I’m quite certain that if it were me, it would’ve risen to the level of aggravated sexual assault because I would not comply and would fight until a haymaker laid me out.

  2. 2
    borax

    I’m convinced that these overzealous searches have nothing to do with finding contraband but are just assholes abusing their authority to humiliate and demean others.

  3. 3
    Raging Bee

    This wasn’t a legitimate search for drugs, it was malicious dehumanizing harassment, plain and simple. Even if drugs were found in both her vagina and her rectum, the amount would not justify even a fraction of the effort made. Does anyone really believe any person’s orifices could hold enough of any drug to make any noticeable difference in even a local drug trade?

    Seriously, has anyone done the numbers here? How much difference would a vagina full of any drug make in any community? Border enforcers should be looking for carloads of drugs, or at least briefcase-loads; looking for vagina-loads is both despicable sadistic bullying and a pathetic waste of time.

  4. 4
    karmacat

    The doctors there need to have their licenses revoked. I hope they sue the hospital

  5. 5
    D. C. Sessions

    To make things worse, her odds of getting any justice are dramatically reduced by the fact that this was done by customs because the courts have ruled that the 4th Amendment is essentially null and void within 100 miles of a controlled border.

    Which includes, among others, the entire cities of Buffalo NY and Seattle WA. Convenient for the police in King County, but of course they’re disciplined by the New Professionalism.

    How much difference would a vagina full of any drug make in any community? Border enforcers should be looking for carloads of drugs, or at least briefcase-loads; looking for vagina-loads is both despicable sadistic bullying and a pathetic waste of time.

    Yeah, but those others are harder to get and (especially around Juarez) hazardous. Much safer to go after 54yo women.

  6. 6
    timgueguen

    These border guards apparently didn’t get the word that drug dogs aren’t magic. There’s a great deal of evidence that even supposedly highly effective drug dogs generate a lot of false hits, and who can tell if a random drug dog falls into the highly effective category.

  7. 7
    left0ver1under

    The US has four freedoms, according to Roosevelt wall street and its puppets:

    Freedom of speech…but only if you toe the official line.

    Freedom of worship…but only the religion of the majority.

    Freedom from want…if it’s democracy, privacy and liberty you want.

    Freedom from fear…of having to think or vote.

  8. 8
    Dunc

    Seriously, has anyone done the numbers here? How much difference would a vagina full of any drug make in any community? Border enforcers should be looking for carloads of drugs, or at least briefcase-loads;

    Container-loads, actually. Dope is smuggled professionally in amounts measured in tonnes (and lots of them). Even very high-value drugs, like high-purity cocaine or heroin, are usually smuggled in multi-kilo volumes. The pros generally smuggle via freight, because (a) it’s the only means that can handle the necessary volumes, (b) it’s much less likely to be discovered, because freight is barely inspected at all at most ports, and (c) if it does get found, you’re nowhere near it at the time. (There are also quite a lot of people using private aircraft or boats, but these are quite tightly scrutinised and fairly easy to detect. Although there was an instance I heard of of some cartel building their own submarines, which shows a degree of resourcefulness you really have to respect…)

    Trying to catch individuals smuggling small quantities of drugs across borders either in their luggage or on their person is not an effective means of restricting drug smuggling, it never can be, and I’m pretty sure everybody involved knows it. It performs 2 functions: it’s “security theatre”, giving the impression that things are under control, and it discourages “independents”, keeping the trade in the hands of organised crime (who you can bet have mutually satisfactory arrangements in place with corrupt law-enforcement and customs). I’ve long suspected that the occasional larger busts you hear of (like ten kilos of coke in some stupid kid’s luggage, or a tonne of weed in a shipping container) are actually part of the arrangement – you’ve got to give the feds a little something every now and then to keep them happy and make them look good, otherwise somebody might start asking awkward questions. Questions like “just how many tonnes of dope does an average-sized city get through in a week, anyway?” There’s a fun little Fermi estimation problem for you…

    And that, kids, is why you should never agree to carry anything through customs for anybody – they’re not going to pay you shit, they’re setting you up to keep their crooked cop / customs buddies sweet.

  9. 9
    Abby Normal

    As I recall they billed her because, after enduring six hours of these searches [sexual assault], they wanted to start repeating some of the procedures. She refused. It is unclear how many more hours she’d have had to endure before the government would have picked up the tab.

  10. 10
    roggg

    The complaint alleges she was given the choice between signing a consent form, or being billed for the procedures. Which is pretty much blackmail.

  11. 11
    Crimson Clupeidae

    This is a serious concern for me. My wife has PTSD related to her childhood, and something like this would likely trigger her into a suicidal depression. I’m pretty sure if we were coming across the border and some overzealous guards wanted to search us like this, it would end badly.

  12. 12
    colnago80

    Re Dunc @ #8

    Hey, Dunc is missing the fact that these procedures are being instituted at the direction of Skull and Bones. Or maybe the Council on Foreign Relations.

  13. 13
    steve84

    That they did a CT scan shows you that this only about money for the “doctors”

  14. 14
    Synfandel

    A CT scan exposes the subject to a huge dose of ionizing radiation—orders of magnitude more than a dental X-ray, for example—and should be used only when medically necessary, because it significantly increases one’s risk of developing cancer. Those doctors have put Ms Doe’s health at risk with no medical justification. The AMA should be disciplining them and the hospital should be paying hefty compensation for the radiation exposure, to say nothing of the sexual assault and emotional abuse.

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