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Dec 17 2013

Miscavige to Be Deposed in Lawsuit

A Texas judge has ruled that Scientology leader David Miscavige must submit to a deposition in a lawsuit filed against the “church” (read: organized crime family) by one of the innumerable people who have been victim of their illegal and repulsive tactics against their critics.

Church of Scientology leader David Miscavige must submit to a deposition in a lawsuit filed against him and two church entities by Monique Rathbun, wife of high-profile church critic Marty Rathbun, a Texas judge ordered Friday.

The ruling was a blow to Scientology’s legal team, which had tried to keep Miscavige distanced from the contentious action. Miscavige has testified in only a handful of cases during his 27 years as the church’s leader…

The 53-year-old leader, who rarely is seen in public, focuses solely on Scientology’s ecclesiastical matters, church lawyers said. He had no connection, his lawyers said, to what Rathbun describes in her suit as a three-year campaign of surveillance and harassment directed at her and her husband.

Forcing Miscavige to testify also would run afoul of First Amendment guarantees of the free exercise of religion, church lawyers said.

But Rathbun contends Miscavige supervised the church’s tactics. Her lead attorney, Ray Jeffrey of San Antonio, argued Miscavige is a central figure in the case, that he micro-manages church operations and that Rathbun’s team has a right to question him about any ties he may have had to the allegations in her suit. Comal County District Judge Dib Waldrip agreed.

He’ll lie under oath, of course, or plead the fifth. If he told the truth, he’d end up in prison. There have now been so many former members of the church, journalists and investigators who have been harassed and bullied by the church that one would have to be delusional to not see the reality.

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  1. 1
    Gregory in Seattle

    If there was ever an argument against the constitutional right to protection of religion, the Co$ would be it.

  2. 2
    Modusoperandi

    He’ll lie under oath, of course, or plead the fifth.

    Obviously. Those are his Scientology MEST powers.

  3. 3
    tubi

    One hopes to see Miscavige deposed for good eventually.

  4. 4
    caseloweraz

    Misprision: either the concealment of treason or the public commission of a crime short of a felony in seriousness.

    Misfeasance: The wrongful exercise of legal authority

    Miscavige: The intentional misrepresentation of religious doctrine as science, in order to misappropriate monies?

  5. 5
    cottonnero

    In terms of real-life villain names, Miscavige, with its wonderfully Dickensian appearance, is probably only just shy of Quisling.

  6. 6
    Modusoperandi

    cottonnero, careful. “Miscavige Quisling” is a Harry Potter spell.

  7. 7
    Alverant

    Best part is that this can be used to make church officials to testify about other illegal activities. That is if a Texas judge doesn’t make exceptions for christianity. But what are the odds of that happening? /s

  8. 8
    Michael Brew

    I don’t know how forcing someone to testify in a case could possibly hinder the free exercise of religion. Oh, wait this is Scientology, so “Thou shalt not testify in court” is probably one of their not-so-secret commandments.

  1. 9
    15 Dec: New York Post adds to Miscavige’s Damaging PR stats

    […] story is also being followed by news.com.au, opposingviews.com, vimeo.com, Radar Online, Free Thought Blogs, Jonathan Turley, Weasel Zippers, NJ NewsDay. That, along with the Daily Mail’s number makes […]

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