Fake ‘Ex-Terrorist’ Gets a Job

Among the seemingly endless number of grifters making lots of money pretending to be “ex-terrorists” turned Christian fundamentalists, Ergun Caner may have risen the furthest and fallen the hardest. The evidence against him is so obvious that even Liberty University fired him as dean of its seminary. But now he’s found another job:

If you were the trustee of a troubled college fighting to keep its accreditation, would you hire as your new president someone who was forced out of a previous academic post for lying about his past? That’s what the trustees of Brewton-Parker College in Georgia have just done; the college announced this week that it has hired Ergun Caner to be its new president.

Caner is the former dean of the seminary at Liberty University who was removed from that job in 2010 when the school could no longer ignore the evidence that the Jihadi-to-Jesus life story Caner had been peddling since the 9/11 attacks turned out to be a pack of lies. (Caner said, for example, that he was raised in Turkey and trained as an America-hating jihadist; in reality he was born in Sweden and moved to the U.S. as a very young child.)

It’s not as if the Brewton-Parker trustees were unaware of Caner’s controversial past. A press release from the college quoted an unnamed trustee saying, “We didn’t consider Dr. Caner in spite of the attacks; we elected him because of them. He has endured relentless and pagan attacks like a warrior. We need a warrior as our next president.”

So apparently, this “university” thinks that lying is a warrior virtue. As long as you’re lying for Jesus, at least.

Comments

  1. tbp1 says

    Once on the Wingnut Welfare Bandwagon, always on the Wingnut Welfare Bandwagon. Somehow they almost always fall up, no matter how egregious their offense.

  2. Loqi says

    They couldn’t find a bigger name who is more qualified? Was OJ Simpson not available? Couldn’t they get Eric Holder? After all, a true warrior doesn’t stop at just lying. A true warrior does it while under oath.

  3. beezlebubby says

    One of my duties in the college where I work is to receive, distribute, track, and submit transfer credit articulation folders, whereby transfer students and current students who did coursework elsewhere submit their credits earned elsewhere for evaluation for transfer credit in our school. I recently forwarded a long transcript for a student who, unfortunately, earned “credits” at Bob Jones “University”. I was holding my breath to see how the advisor would award credits. The folder came back with a boldly written post-it note: “School not accredited, therefore no credits may be awarded”. I feel sorry for that student and parents who wasted time and money, being hoodwinked into believing that BJU was in any regard a real college. Instead of entering this school as a third-year student, they will be starting from scratch. I wonder if officials at Liberty and BJU warn families that nobody will accept their credits?

  4. lorn says

    ” I wonder if officials at Liberty and BJU warn families that nobody will accept their credits?”

    For legal reasons I’m pretty sure they are ‘informed’. Somewhere in that stack of application paperwork there was what looked like a dotted line used to separate sections. If you use a high powered microscope you can clearly read the required legalese disclosure.

  5. says

    I recently forwarded a long transcript for a student who, unfortunately, earned “credits” at Bob Jones “University”. I was holding my breath to see how the advisor would award credits. The folder came back with a boldly written post-it note: “School not accredited, therefore no credits may be awarded”.

    Uh, Bob Jones University is definitely accredited, at least since 2005. Maybe the course work was through a non-accredited program of theirs or something. Liberty has been accredited since 1980.

    Pensacola Christian College only received accreditation this year, so anyone from past years would have had difficulty getting their credits transferred or being accepted into a post-graduate program. When I was in grad school, we had a summer undergrad program, and one student in our lab was from PCC. She would talk about how well-regarded the school was and how they were promised that they would be first in line for admission to graduate programs, etc. It later occurred to me that this was an incredibly wicked lie.

  6. freehand says

    I have a cousin who graduated from Bob Jones 35 years ago – with a degree in music. She works as a church organist, last I heard. So their diplomas aren’t worthless. (Poor lass. Pretty and smart, but very timid and raised Southern Baptist. I wonder if she now feels trapped, or has even escaped?)

  7. tbp1 says

    For some reason I got interested in the BJU accreditation issue. For decades they resisted even applying for accreditation. Currently the are recognized by the Transnational Association of Christian Colleges and Schools. I don’t have any idea how legit that is. They are not recognized by the primary regional agency, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, although they have applied. They have quite a good department in my discipline and I wouldn’t hesitate to accept a grad student application from there, assuming the usual: good transcript, recommendations, etc. However, given what I can tell about their approach to the sciences, I don’t know how my colleagues in, say, the biology department or the med school would feel about students from there.

  8. Larry says

    That is quite a message Brewton-Parker is sending to its students, that lying is that pathway to success. It certainly tells me a lot about it. You have to wonder how their code of conduct for students reads.

  9. jnorris says

    If Mr Caner truely repented, with lots of crying, then a True Christian College ™ should have him. but they should keep a close eye on him too.

  10. caseloweraz says

    He has endured relentless and pagan attacks like a warrior.

    Are they saying that Liberty University is a pagan institution?

  11. says

    However, given what I can tell about their approach to the sciences, I don’t know how my colleagues in, say, the biology department or the med school would feel about students from there.

    I guess I should mention that I had a friend in grad school who was a graduate of BJU. He was a highly competent student and researcher. I don’t know how much of the school’s religious nuttery rubbed off on him (if any of it did, it didn’t show), but it was not an impediment to his either getting into a good graduate program or graduating or getting a good career in biotech.

Leave a Reply