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Badass Quote of the Day

I love the first paragraph of this editorial from the Salt Lake Tribune about a bill in the Utah state legislature that purports to protect the religious liberty of public school students from imaginary threats. This seems surprising to me, but maybe if I read that paper regularly it wouldn’t:

Convincing people that you have come to rescue them from threats that do not exist is a good way to raise campaign funds or win votes in a neighborhood caucus. But it is a lousy way to govern.

That could apply to about 70% of the conservative agenda right now.

Sen. Todd Weiler, R-Woods Cross, isn’t claiming that the religious rights of Utah public school students are really under threat. But he still wants to waste the Legislature’s time and taxpayers’ money by pursuing a bill that would purport to give public school students several rights that nobody questions and one that could create some unnecessary woes.

The lawmaker says his as-yet undrafted bill, soon to appear in the file titled “Religious Freedom for Students,” is patterned after Mississippi’s Student Religious Liberties Act. Which is, in turn, if by happenstance, mostly patterned after a set of guidelines the federal government has been promoting as far back as 1998.

Despite what some religious leaders may want you to believe, the religious rights of public school students have never been excluded from our educational institutions, except by the occasional fearful teacher or clueless bureaucrat who didn’t get the memo.

Exactly right. And those fearful teachers and clueless bureaucrats are likely getting it wrong precisely because the same people who complain about their actions keep mindlessly repeating that all religion has been banned, or as they like to say “God has been expelled,” from public schools.

Comments

  1. jamessweet says

    And those fearful teachers and clueless bureaucrats are likely getting it wrong precisely because the same people who complain about their actions keep mindlessly repeating that all religion has been banned

    I don’t really think this is a fair characterization. Certainly, the noise from the right wing smoke machine doesn’t actually help the conversation… but I think it’s a bit too much to say they deserve the majority of the blame. Really, I think most of the blame is just human nature: People get things wrong. Definitely educators could be better, erm, educated about this issue. But I don’t feel right saying it’s the right-wingers fault.

  2. Crip Dyke, Right Reverend Feminist FuckToy of Death & Her Handmaiden says

    For God to be expelled, must she first have been enrolled?

    I’ll happily put the name of any god you like on the roster for any class I teach and even set a copy of the exam on an empty desk, but don’t be surprised when I expel them on the basis of the attendance and performance.

    From what I’ve seen, expelling gods is the only reasonable course of action.

  3. uzza says

    That could apply to about 70% of the conservative agenda right now.

    THAT was the badass quote of the day!

  4. wilsim says

    We have a case that just launched here in Portland where a 20 year employee of the city has been bickering with her coworker for the last couple of years. Something about aggressive “bless yous” and “told you not to say that to me” and stalking. The lawsuit, because the person is suing the city for religious discrimination, even finishes with a prayer.

    “Convincing people that you have come to rescue them from threats that do not exist is a good way to raise campaign funds or win votes in a neighborhood caucus. But it is a lousy way to govern.”
    It is also a way to be a lousy coworker.

  5. notruescott says

    The SL Tribune has long been a more or less independent voice in Salt Lake City, more so in the past when they regularly engaged in a very entertaining tussle with the Deseret News (the publishing arm of the LDS church) than recently, but they nevertheless are still a fairly liberal voice in a very conservative state. Salt Lake City itself tends to be fairly liberal compared with the rest of the state, which is why the legislature found it necessary to gerrymander the hell out of it recently. Bully for then, anyway.

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