Wiles: House Stenographer a Prophet


The husband of House stenographer Dianne Reidy, Dan, is making the rounds of the wingnut websites and radio shows defending his wife and talking about how God spoke through her. He found a receptive audience in the thoroughly deranged Rick Wiles, who thinks she’s a prophet:

Reidy: She shared with me when she actually stepped up to the podium that she didn’t know what she was going to say; that those words that came out were what she prayed ‘Lord, I’m your vessel, you speak through me.’ So her belief is, and my belief is, is that those words came from God. It’s not He coached her, she memorized the words or anything like that. In fact, afterwards, I don’t think she even remembered what she said … She was like, I was just the vessel that God was speaking through and it wasn’t for me to know what I said, it was for who was hearing it…

Wiles: I believe God gave a prophetic utterance through your wife. I believe it was an utterance from the Holy Spirit, a very, very solemn, a very severe prophetic warning to the people of the United States.

Reidy: Yes, I agree with you. She was prepared for it and she gave it and as a scribe does, they’re all about words and He gave her the words and she recorded the words or spoke the words and she feels her job is done.

Her job may indeed be done, though not in that way. Wiles then went on an incoherent rant about the Freemasons, the Illuminati, the TSA and how the impending destruction of America was all planned from the start. He says the Constitution was written by Freemasons and that the Freemasons are part of a conspiracy to destroy the Constitutional republic that they established.

Comments

  1. colnago80 says

    Leaving out the Trilateral Commission, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Illuminati, and the Bilderberg Group.

  2. kantalope says

    Is it interesting that the words of god sound just the babblings of someone that is having a mental breakdown?

  3. matty1 says

    Leaving out the Trilateral Commission, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Illuminati, and the Bilderberg Group.

    Yet again the lizard people cruelly overlooked.

  4. matty1 says

    More seriously there should be some penalty or at least stigma for those who faced with the mentally ill encourage their delusions instead of encouraging them to seek help. If this poor woman ends up a danger to herself or others Wiles will bear some responsibility.

  5. lldayo says

    Yet again the lizard people cruelly overlooked.

    Of course! They’re the best at staying hidden!

  6. Pierce R. Butler says

    … the Freemasons are part of a conspiracy to destroy the Constitutional republic that they established.

    Reportedly, John Adams never joined the Freemasons (though he “spoke favorably” of them) – but he did start the first Tea Party, so he clearly did more to destroy the not-even-conceived nation than any other Founder.

    Ergo, the Freemasons count as part of the Adams conspiracy.

  7. John Allman says

    Is a dislike of the secret societies, global governance and all that jazz considered to be a “right wing” preoccupation then? I wouldn’t have seen it as either left wing or right wing, since the secret societies are deployed by those whose method is to make sure whenever possible that voters have a choice between two candidates, one left and one right, who are equally compromised. For example, a few years ago, there was a US presidential election in which the candidates were called Bush and Kerry, both of them bonesmen.

  8. says

    The poor woman had a mental/emotional breakdown, she’s in need of help and compassion…and her own husband is helping a bunch of religious con-artists USE her for their own gain and gratification. This isn’t as vile as getting her falling-down drunk and then pimping her out to his friends…but it’s on the same order of magnitude.

  9. says

    Is a dislike of the secret societies, global governance and all that jazz considered to be a “right wing” preoccupation then?

    The right are getting a lot more mileage out of it than the left ever did. And besides, this sort of conspiratorial thinking, and the bigotry and disconnect from reality that underlie it, are basic features of most, if not all, fascist/authoritarian movements: it’s how backward people respond to social change, by looking for nefarious conspiracies and easy scapegoats.

    For example, a few years ago, there was a US presidential election in which the candidates were called Bush and Kerry, both of them bonesmen.

    That’s an example of…what again?

  10. Artor says

    “This isn’t as vile as getting her falling-down drunk and then pimping her out to his friends…but it’s on the same order of magnitude.”

    Nailed it!

  11. reasonbe says

    So where is Dianne Reidy and why can’t she make the rounds on these bottom-feeder talk shows? She’s most likely on the edge of crazy, given her performance. I’m sure the USG is reviewing her clearances, and her career at the House is over. Her husband is a piece of work, too.

  12. matty1 says

    For example, a few years ago, there was a US presidential election in which the candidates were called Bush and Kerry, both of them bonesmen.

    That’s an example of…what again?

    Anecdote or random fact. Or maybe themed drinking clubs run the world.

  13. bmiller says

    Well….if one looks at the vviolence and coldness and insanity built into the structure of the universe (by human definitions, at least) then the idea of an insane God is not too farfetched (LOL)

    http://rsbakker.wordpress.com/2012/12/10/the-rant-within-the-undead-god-by-benjamin-cain/

    …But if there’s no room in nature for this personal God whose possible existence we’re biologically compelled to contemplate, and there’s nothing for this God to do in the universe that shapes itself, the supreme theology is the most dire one, namely the speculation that Philipp Mainlander will one day formulate before promptly going insane and killing himself: God is literally dead. God committed elaborate suicide by transforming himself into something that could be perfectly destroyed, which is the material universe. God became corrupted by his omnipotence and insane by his alienation, and so the creativity of his ultimate act is an illusion: the world’s evolution is the process of God’s self-destruction, and we are vermin feeding off of God’s undying corpse. Sure, this is just a fiction, but it’s the most plausible way of fitting God–and so also our instinctive, irrational theistic inclination–into the rest of the ghastly postmodern worldview to come.

  14. says

    Wait, I thought that Jesus wrote the Constitution, taking parts verbatim from the bible, according to David Barton. Does this mean Jesus was a Freemason?
    I’ve only had one encounter with Masons. I was raised Roman Catholic in a highly Roman Catholic neighborhood in Chicago. The only thing we knew about Masons was we couldn’t become one. About 20 years ago I was notified that I had been chosen Man of the Year for my work with homeless people by the local Masonic Lodge. They invited me to a banquet in my honor. I figured if these people have the potential to take over the world they must have the ability to throw a decent banquet. So I went. We were served dried-out egg salad sandwiches, potato chips, and lemonade from a mix. Then I realized that they are totally incapable of taking over anything.

  15. John Pieret says

    So where is Dianne Reidy and why can’t she make the rounds on these bottom-feeder talk shows?

    Because like every godly woman her place is at home. I suspect she only had her (former) job because it was in the House.

  16. felidae says

    Those people in the past who were called prophets and seers who had visions and heard the voice of god today are diagnosed as bipolar or schizophrenic and treated as disordered instead of being venerated as mouthpieces of the divine

  17. Sastra says

    Raging Bee #9 wrote:

    The poor woman had a mental/emotional breakdown, she’s in need of help and compassion…and her own husband is helping a bunch of religious con-artists USE her for their own gain and gratification.

    I’ll ask again: How do you know she had a “mental/emotional breakdown” and isn’t just a crank herself?

    You may be right. I don’t know. But if her husband or this radio host had managed to stride up to the microphone and spoken the same “Truths” while being “moved by the Holy Spirit” — would you be just as quick to assume that they suffer from a genuine mental illness? That they need help and compassion?

    Do they need it now? Or are they “con artists” because they can’t possibly be sincere about this nonsense?

    You can be both.

  18. says

    Sastra: I’m calling it a breakdown because it’s not consistent with her normal performance at work, as indicated by what I’ve read so far. If there’s more facts I’ve missed, I’ll revise my judgement.

  19. Sastra says

    Raging Bee #20 wrote:

    I’m calling it a breakdown because it’s not consistent with her normal performance at work, as indicated by what I’ve read so far.

    Fair enough — but from what I read it sounds to me as if it was inconsistent because she kept her religious/conspiracy views and practices to herself. I wonder what she would have said or done if she had ever been asked by co-workers? Was she?

    It may be “out of character” for a hitherto quiet employee to suddenly go off on a public rant or complaint about what’s wrong with the company, the boss, the product, etc … but that’s not unheard of and it needn’t by itself indicate mental illness. I think we are all inclined to suppose that the bizarre conspiracy talk coupled with the “prompting of the Holy Spirit” has just got to be some sort of insanity in the serious, clinical sense of the word.

    But this is the world she lives in. This is all normal in her community — both the world view AND the regular use of ‘Lord, I’m your vessel, you speak through me.’ Which means I think that there’s at least a fair possibility she’s basically normal and what she did was “brave” when viewed against the background of her beliefs and culture.

    Beliefs and culture which might turn out to be the underlying problem, not just a convenient way for a paranoid schizophrenic (or whatever) to pass undetected.

  20. Nick Gotts says

    those whose method is to make sure whenever possible that voters have a choice between two candidates, one left and one right and one further right, who are equally compromised – John Allman

    FIFY

  21. cuervodecuero says

    Snort. If she’s a prophet then so am I, because I called this career change two days ago in the comments here.

  22. raven says

    Well….if one looks at the vviolence and coldness and insanity built into the structure of the universe (by human definitions, at least) then the idea of an insane God is not too farfetched (LOL)

    H.P. Lovecraft called this one long ago. If there are real prophets, he is one.

    I’d ask Cthulhu, but that never works out well. People who do that don’t get an answer. Then again, they never come back either.

  23. freehand says

    She didn’t sound any more mentally ill than my preacher Grandaddy, although he would have made it clear that God doesn’t speak through the voices of women.

  24. exdrone says

    If Reidy’s husband believes she’s a prophet, then she might do well to reveal that God now wants him to sign over the house to her. He, of course, would agree that she now beyond question.

  25. Ichthyic says

    I’ll ask again: How do you know she had a “mental/emotional breakdown” and isn’t just a crank herself?

    Has the idea that she was deliberately paid to say that been discussed?

    because if the religious right were looking to keep themselves in the spotlight, what better way could they get attention for themselves?

  26. Ichthyic says

    I’d ask Cthulhu, but that never works out well. People who do that don’t get an answer. Then again, they never come back either.

    Cthulhu likes people that ask intelligent questions.

    They get eaten first, doing them a big favor!

  27. Ichthyic says

    But this is the world she lives in. This is all normal in her community

    I wonder if lepers start to think leprosy is normal after living in a leper colony for a long time?

  28. says

    “He says the Constitution was written by Freemasons and that the Freemasons are part of a conspiracy to destroy the Constitutional republic that they established.”

    Well, it sorta makes sense. Wiles wholly benemalevolent GOD made himself a real nice human race (with allathem accessory critters) and then got pissed because it misbehaved–EXACTLY like he KNEW it would, when he made it–and dopeslapped it with 40 days of rain.

  29. a miasma of incandescent plasma says

    The recordings all cut-off her last line.

    “A twisted tail, a thousand eyes, trapped FOREVER!!
    EPA! EPA! EEEEEEPA!!!!!!!”

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