New Zealand Psychic Lies About Solving Crime

America isn’t the only country that has a serious problem with “psychics” making false claims about all the important work they’ve done helping police solve crimes. A psychic in New Zealand has enraged the family of a woman who disappeared a decade ago by claiming that she helped solve what turned out to be a murder.

Friends and family of the late Sara Niethe are outraged by a psychic’s claim she solved the case of her murder.

It is ten years since Ms Niethe went missing, but her ex-boyfriend Mark Pakenham didn’t admit killing her until seven months ago.

The case featured on TV programme Sensing Murder in 2008 and on the weekend one of the show’s psychics, Sue Nicholson, told 3 News it was the one case she solved.

Ms Niethe’s friend Rachel Mains says family and friends were astounded by the claim.

“We were really shocked and horrified,” she says. “The case isn’t solved and really Sue didn’t do anything to help.”…

She didn’t respond to requests for a second interview with 3 News, but posted a message saying she had been misrepresented through editing, and that she had actually been asked if any offenders had subsequently been caught in cases she had worked on.

Just to be clear, in the original interview with 3 News she was asked: “How many cases did you solve?”

She replied: “Well, there’s one been solved – Sarah Neish.”

The very first comment on the article is from former FTB blogger Kylie Sturgess, who pointed out that Nicholson did indeed make that claim:

I was at the New Zealand Skeptics conference, where she confirmed that name to the audience, and clearly she said it to the TV. So, it’s not misrepresentation. The conference presentation she did was also recorded, I think.

A “psychic” caught lying? The odds of that are about 1:1.

3 comments on this post.
  1. lordshipmayhem:

    I think you could have dropped the last three words of the headline, and still said the same thing… :D

  2. Crip Dyke, Right Reverend Feminist FuckToy of Death & Her Handmaiden:

    Odds 1:1 are the same as p = 0.5

    I think you meant the probability is 1/1.

  3. khms:

    Oh, I’m sure it’s closer to p=0.5 than p=1.

    For example, they’ll usually tell the truth if you ask them if they’re a psychic, or how much they want from you for their consultation, or what their business phone number is, or stuff like that.

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