More Lies From ‘Crisis Pregnancy Centers’


Pro-choice groups continue to go into Crisis Pregnancy Centers and catching the entirely unqualified people who work there telling egregious lies to women seeking help. The latest sting was in Virginia, which captured audio of a whole pack of falsehoods being spewed.

lp-Ressler on August 8, 2013 at 9:40 am
cpc

CREDIT: NARAL Pro-Choice Virginia

An new undercover investigation into Virginia’s right-wing “crisis pregnancy centers” (CPCs) exposes the blatant misinformation about women’s health, as well as the shame-based messages surrounding sexuality, that their employees typically impart to patients. NARAL Pro-Choice Virginia — which has been working for years to expose the dozens of CPCs in the state — caught the lies on tape and released their findings on Wednesday.

NARAL recorded a counseling session between a young woman and a CPC employee. The woman received false information about the risks of hormonal birth control, misleading explanations about how contraception works, and judgmental messages about her decision to be sexually active before getting married. During the conversation, the CPC counselor repeatedly suggested that her organization was more trustworthy than the staff at abortion clinics, since abortion providers are ultimately trying to convince their patients to spend money at the clinic. “I’m not lying to you, sweetie — why would I lie to you? I’m not asking you to give me anything here,” she said. “We’re a pregnancy health and education center.”

For several minutes, a CPC employee told horror stories about the dangers of being on birth control, saying she typically tries to talk women out of using it. She likened birth control to “tremendous dosages of steroids,” and belittled her patient for opting to flood her body with artificial hormones. “You really want that stuff inside of you? You have a brain, think and choose here,” she said. “Any of that stuff is just not good for you.”

According to the CPC counselor, birth control is dangerous because taking it for four years before becoming pregnant can increase women’s chance of getting breast cancer by 48 percent. She repeatedly referred to the “carcinogens” in contraception. She also cautioned her client to “read the fine print,” warning that even if she would never choose to have an abortion, she could accidentally end up aborting a fetus while using hormonal contraception. “If you’re on the pill, on the patch, on the shot, and get pregnant… Unintentionally, you will abort that baby because the uterus cannot sustain that pregnancy because the lining has been so altered by those steroids, the artificial hormones,” she claimed.

The CPC employee falsely asserted that condoms and birth control pills are about equally effective at preventing pregnancy, and claimed that using condoms doesn’t actually prevent the transmission of sexually transmitted infections. “They’re naturally porous — there’s always a chance of them breaking, a chance of spillage,” she said. “The only safe sex is no sex.”

The conversation also quickly took a religious bent. “If you’re not married, why are you having sex?” the CPC counselor asked her client. “That’s why you feel like you have to put these hormones in your body — the more you have sex, the more chance you have of getting pregnant.” Later, she added, “Confined to a marriage, of course, sex is expected — you believe in God, that’s the whole plan of God.”

And remember, these places exist to talk women out of having abortions. And what do they tell them? Not to use birth control. Because the real target, as I’ve been saying for years, is not abortion. If their goal was to stop abortion they would be demanding that birth control be as widely available as chewing gum. But they aren’t because that isn’t really their goal. Their goal is for no woman to have any control over their reproduction at all so it’s all up to God — and the men they think God has put in charge of women.

You can hear the audio recordings here. And bear in mind that in some states, these centers receive public funding to tell these lies.

Comments

  1. Chiroptera says

    And bear in mind that in some states, these centers receive public funding to tell these lies.

    That doesn’t surprise me. Don’t some states have laws that require doctors to read lies to their patients if they are considering terminating a pregnancy?

  2. dugglebogey says

    I’m against the death penalty, but the only reason I would favor it is in cases of people who think it’s their duty to shame people because of their sexual desires.

  3. anubisprime says

    Put any religiously infected goon in any position of direct manipulation with a target in front of them and they will lie…then lie about their lying…it is what they do!

  4. jws1 says

    @ anubisprime: And then strike a victim pose when called out. If they really think their message is so wonderful, then why so many believers feel compelled to lie so much?

  5. raven says

    If they really think their message is so wonderful, then why so many believers feel compelled to lie so much?

    If their religion was true, they wouldn’t have to lie all the time.

  6. says

    I’m stunned. I had no idea that people who float on the absolute certainty that only absolute ignorance can provide could get the facts so terribly wrong.
    Wait. Scratch that. It’s exactly what I’d expect.

  7. markr1957 says

    At the very least I hope the caller insisted that the ‘counselor’ repeat the 9th Commandment with her, and maybe even asked about the consequences of breaking the Commandments.

  8. Hayden says

    Their goal is for no woman to have any control over their reproduction at all so it’s all up to God

    I don’t think they really have a clearly defined goal. They seem to simply be railing against anything “bad” without examining whether any of these “bad” things are actually harmful or not.

  9. oranje says

    “Wait, were you doing something fun? Honey, that’s not God’s plan for you. You’re supposed to be miserable.”

  10. Erk12 says

    The “solution” to this will be passing legislation making it illegal to record a conversation in a CPC.

  11. gerryl says

    I recently read The Child Catchers: Rescue, Trafficking, and the New Gospel of Adoption, which contends many of the CPCs are aligned with adoption agencies. So the anti-birth control message makes sense if they are in the business of providing babies to be raised in “good Christian families.” Apparently there is a very aggressive effort in evangelical circles to encourage adoptions. When keeping children “born out of wedlock” lost its shame in this country, they moved a lot of the activity overseas.

  12. jaybee says

    ACORN tried to register unregistered voters. They got set up by a misleadingly edited sting video, and it worked; funding was yanked, and they folded.

    What are the odds that this tape of CPC lies will lead to the same end? Zero. Firstly, despite the right’s claim that the media is “left wing,” there is no left wing hype machine like Fox News to push the story. Secondly, Democrats, by and large, just don’t have it in them to whip themselves up into hysteria (real or faked) like the right wingers do.

  13. Jessica Clark says

    like Lawrence answered I can’t believe that a stay at home mom able to get paid $8399 in four weeks on the computer. have you read this website…www.max34.Com

  14. says

    I applaud this journalism, because these things need to come out. I abhor what CPCs are doing.

    I don’t think it’s fair, though, to assume the counselor is lying. I was an adult when I became an atheist, and before that I spent a short time involved with a CPC, and my experience was that all the people except for maybe one or two were unpaid volunteers. They generally seemed to have no more medical or biological knowledge than I did, and certainly the comments made above are what I believed to be true at that time. These are things that are said in every type of Christian media from the radio shows and magazine articles to novels written for Christian teenagers and science curriculum for Christian schools. Some of the things i thought to be true I cared about more than others (I found it difficult to get exercised about the supposed abortifacient properties of birth control, for example) but I didn’t know any reason to not believe the things I had been taught were true.

    Some people are lying. The people who wrote my science textbooks, for example, no doubt knew better, at least some of them. The person who wrote that YA religious novel I read that suggested it was unromantic to use condoms during sex was really terrible. But my parents and the Sunday school teachers and the youth group counselors who told me these things probably believed them themselves.

    I can’t decide if the willful ignorance which spreads itself with the fervor of true belief or the cynical lying is worse, honestly.

  15. zahnarzt says

    Have their been cries about entrapment from the anti-choice side? Or would that be too hypocritical after their praising of that halfwit who did hidden camera investigations of ACORN?

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