Creationist Demands Museum Not Allow Science Event


David Shormann, a fairly obscure Texas creationist, is clutching his pearls over an event held this weekend at the Houston Museum of Natural History called “Answers In Science: What On Earth Do We Know?” That event featured PZ Myers and Aron Ra from FTB. But the fact they’re criticizing creationism, Shormann absurdly declares, means they’re engaging in “bigotry and religious intolerance.”

Then, on Sunday, they will take their show to the Houston Museum of Natural Science, who stands to profit off their bigotry and religious intolerance by renting them Moran Lecture Hall.

In the photo, you can see some of the signs they plan to wave, which make irrational, untrue, and downright goofy claims. The photo is found on the blog of atheist Aron Ra (Warning! Aron is quite the capitalist, fueling his anti-Christian bigotry with “pop-up” advertisements that appear when you click on any links, plus ads to the side of the blog text).

Warning that he (actually me; Aron Ra has nothing to do with the ad placements) is a capitalist? Really?

Because God is a necessary precondition for rationiality, rejecting God equates with rejecting reason. Atheist Aron Ra makes this obvious in the audio clip, as apparently he uses magic instead of reason to define things. Of course, Aron and all atheists use reason to understand and evaluate anything, which exposes the fact that they know God exists.

I really, really hate presuppositionalism. It’s just such a childlish and stupid argument.

Atheist rejection of reason is obvious on their protest signs, too. For example, take a look at their foolish sign that ends with “don’t handicap your kids with creationism.” This is obviously false for many reasons, one of which is that the founder of the scientific method, Francis Bacon, was a young earth creationist!

Imagine that. A guy who lived long before we had the means to date the earth didn’t know how old the earth is. How entirely unsurprising and irrelevant to the actual age of the earth.

I am particularly disappointed that the Houston Museum of Natural Science (HMNS) does not seem to have a problem with making a profit off of such a religiously intolerant group. Not only are they attacking Christianity, they are attacking one man in particular, Ken Ham. It is un-American to support such religious intolerance and false claims that Christians are “anti-science”.

David, the word you’re searching in vain for is “criticizing.” Ken Ham is being criticized because he says blatantly false things every time he opens his mouth. Because he’s teaching lies to the ignorant and the credulous. He isn’t being persecuted, nor are you. Now climb down off that cross, use the wood to build a bridge and get over it.

Comments

  1. John Pieret says

    Ken Ham is being criticized because he says blatantly false things every time he opens his mouth. Because he’s teaching lies to the ignorant and the credulous.

    Since Shormann is particularly ignorant and credulous himself he is unlikely to recognize that.

  2. steve oberski says

    And Isaac Newton was an alchemist therefore alchemy is true.

    And he was also a unitarian therefore Shormann’s trinitarian (I assume) beliefs are heretical.

  3. colnago80 says

    Re steve oberski @ #2

    Actually, Newton was an Arian, although I’m not totally sure what the difference is.

    Re John Pieret @ #1

    Let’s not forget that cowardly piece of excrement Ken Ham declined to debate PZ Myers and Aron Ra on the subject of evolution. Ole Kenny boy has some chicken feathers where his internal fortitude ought to be.

  4. Sastra says

    Since introducing religious faith into a question immediately reframes the issue as a character challenge, the distinction between attacking an idea and attacking a person is blurred. The same people who label scientific criticisms of creationism “bigotry” do the same with rational critiques of religion: atheists, too, are bigoted. They’re not accepting other people’s religious identity. They’re trying to change it.

    The ironic thing is that introducing the concepts of tolerance and acceptance into how religion is treated automatically takes it out of the ‘truth claim’ area and places it into the category of personal preferences and tastes, neither right nor wrong. Creationists (and fundamentalists) obviously don’t want to do this — because they think they are right (correction: God is right; they’re just the humble messengers.)

    But the urge to protect themselves from criticism is obviously too strong. So they want it both ways: religion should be respected as a very personal and privately-motivated choice …. AND it has the sort of powerful evidence which can kick the ass of any argument and any one who disagrees!

    Can’t lose with that strategy.

    Presuppositionalism is just icing on the cake of their evidential arguments. If you’re in danger of losing — refuse to play the game and insist that no, it’s the OTHER guy who won’t play properly.

  5. matty1 says

    I really, really hate presuppositionalism. It’s just such a childlish and stupid argument.

    It’s also the best one theists have going, all arguments for a god have flaws but if you just assume there is one you don’t have to worry about that.

  6. jefferylanam says

    colagno80, Arianism is the belief that Christ was created by God, not part of him from the beginning as with Trinitarianism. This was a big deal back in the fifth century. Another way of putting it is that Christ was of “like essence” as God, rather than the “same essence”. The Greek words for these concepts are homoiousia and homoousia, from which comes the phrase “an iota’s worth of difference”.

  7. oranje says

    I think I’m going to dump some money in founding a pearl exchange. I should be able to make a mint with all of this clutching…

  8. caseloweraz says

    Because God is a necessary precondition for rationiality (sic), rejecting God equates with rejecting reason. Atheist Aron Ra makes this obvious in the audio clip, as apparently he uses magic instead of reason to define things. Of course, Aron and all atheists use reason to understand and evaluate anything, which exposes the fact that they know God exists.

    Now let me get this straight: Do they use reason by rejecting it, or do they reject reason by using it?

    (I’ve got reason for the asking…)

  9. evodevo says

    @ colnago80 & jefferylanam –

    Being Arian could get you massacred or burnt for heresy or exiled back in them there days (See “Jesus Wars” by Philip Jenkins). Also, a lot of the Visigoths and other “barbarians” who besieged Rome were in fact Arian Christians. Fascinating history.

  10. woggler says

    You accuse Ken Ham of lying every time he opens his mouth. This misses the fact that he writes a helluva lot of lies, too.

  11. colnago80 says

    Re evodevo @ #13

    Arianism was considered heresy by the Raping Children Church and the C. of E. If Newton’s beliefs had become known in his time, he would have been in serious trouble and might even have lost his head.

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