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A Black Writer on the ‘Gay Takeover of America’

One of the common occurrences in history is the transformation of the oppressed into the oppressor. Here we have a good example in a column by Crystal Wright, a black woman who thinks that gay people should be denied the equal rights that her ancestors fought for, and uses the same arguments used by those who opposed the equality she now seeks to deny to others.

What is happening to our country? Gays, who represent less than 3% of our population, are trying to dominate our culture and society. Love whom you want. Love the one you’re with. People don’t really care. This is the message most people want to say but are afraid to because the LBGT (lesbian, bi-sexual, gay and transgender) community will verbally flog anyone who doesn’t agree with them. Between gay marriage, gay adoptions, forcing the Boy Scouts to admit gay scouts and scout masters, and lauding a rich NBA player for announcing he’s gay, the message is clear from gay America to the 97% of the rest of us. You will accept our lifestyle as mainstream. My response: “No I won’t.”

I know, right? Just like black people only make up 13% of the population, yet they think they should have equal rights to the other 87%. It’s madness!

Notice when anyone rejects this gay agenda based on religious beliefs or personal views, they are called bigots or mocked. Appearing on Meet the Press May 5, 2013, Republican Newt Gingrich noted the Catholic Church is prohibited from performing adoption services in states like Massachusetts and the District of Columbia because the Church will only allow a married couple (by definition a man and woman) to adopt a baby. This is a perversion of societal norms all in the name of liberals forcing their political correctness down America’s throat whether her people have an opinion about it or not.

This is all false. The Catholic Church is not prohibited from performing adoptions services at all, they’re just forbidden from discriminating while accepting taxpayer money to do so. They chose not to do so rather than stop discriminating. Do you suppose Wright would be ranting about “liberals forcing their political correctness down America’s throat” if this involved not allowing parents to adopt a child of a different race? Because her ideological ancestors made this same argument about that.

Liberals are eager to help the “gay lobby” with its takeover of America. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced March 29, 2013 plans to consider allowing Medicare to pay for sex change surgeries and invited public comments on the topic. Later that day, HHS abruptly pulled the proposal. While the agency said it was due to “an administrative challenge” of Medicare’s 1981 decision not to cover such operations, it seems news coverage of HHS’ proposal had something to do with its about face. I doubt Republicans in Congress would think sex change operations were a good use of taxpayer money.

And as we all know, the measure of all spending is whether Republicans in Congress think it’s a good idea. And by the way, how exactly is allowing Medicare to cover sex change operations a “takeover of America”?

No matter how many TV shows are produced about gay couples being married and raising children, or phones calls made by president Obama to gay athletes, homosexuality will never be the majority in our culture. I think it’s high time the 97% of the rest of heterosexual America stand up for the preservation of American society not the distortion of it.

Which is exactly the same argument made against civil rights for black people. And women. A black woman, of all people, really should be more careful about declaring that giving equal rights to others is a bad thing.

Comments

  1. CaitieCat says

    Been a long, long time since “sex change” was a nice thing to say, Ed. If you want to catch up to the 90s, go with “sex reassignment surgery”, or come much more up to date with “sex realignment surgery”, but “sex change” is kinda the Playboy/Hustler way to describe trans people’s lives anymore, rather than the considerate one – think “tranny” or “she-male” vs “trans woman”, or “mongoloid” vs. “person with Down syndrome”.

    Agreed with you on principle, but it’d be nice if you could catch up a bit on the other. There are plenty of us around, after all. :)

    Signed, one’a them trans women.

  2. blf says

    And by the way, how exactly is allowing Medicare to cover sex change operations a “takeover of America”?

    Oh, easy! Everytime you visit a doctor’s office, or hospital, or pharmacy, or whatever, and it’s paid for by Medicare, “they” will change your sex. You’ll keep flip-flopping back-and-forth so much you’ll eventually lose track not only of your birth sex and preferred sex, but also your current sex. So you’ll just have to be Bi. So you’ll have both Lesbian and Gay sex (possibly at the same time depending on just how confused you are). And done! The UleSbiangAy has arrived!

  3. slc1 says

    I think that the current politically correct terminology is “gender reassignment surgery”.

  4. Michael Heath says

    Crystal Wright states:

    Love whom you want. Love the one you’re with. People don’t really care. This is the message most people want to say but are afraid to because the LBGT (lesbian, bi-sexual, gay and transgender) community will verbally flog anyone who doesn’t agree with them.

    WTF? Sounds like Ray Comfort claiming he’s a true defender of science.

    I get the point that a black woman should be less prone to bigotry and fascism; I find what resonates here goes one step beyond that. I think Ms. Wright’s reprehensible behavior argument powerfully illustrates how a conservative mind-set remains immune to facts and compels this population to defend indefensible positions; in spite of the suffering her ancestors suffered from such thinking.

    Such thinking also gets a powerful boost when you combine conservatism with an embrace of religionism that not only amplifies such defective thinking, but introduces dogma that justifies the illogical conclusions of such thinking.

  5. blf says

    Interesting. I had no idea anyone objected to the phrase “sex change”. Thanks for pointing this out!

  6. CaitieCat says

    Thanks for pointing this out!

    @6 – you’re most welcome. I figured that it was more a case of not having heard the information, certainly on Ed’s part.

    I believe* the thinking is that “sex/gender realignment surgery” (I’ve seen either) is that the body’s sex is being realigned with the identity’s gender…

    Me, I’m still cool with SRS/GRS as a name, but “sex change” does feel kinda porn-mag to me, and I know people more radical than I on trans* issues who find it a slur. I’m old enough that it was the polite form when I transitioned, so I don’t feel it that way, but there are certainly some who do. Usually safer to go with the more recent one, if one’s goal is to avoid being pointlessly potentially offensive.

    * I transitioned twenty years ago. A lot has changed since then, so I’m not always up on the newest lingo myself.

  7. says

    Ms. Wright:

    When your ancestors were freed from the shackles of slavery, I think the polite thing to do would be to put the key to said shackles someplace where other oppressed persons might find it. mmmkay?

  8. steffp says

    That’s Uncle Tom’s Grandchildren to you…
    The US have a long history of excluding (usually newly arrived) ethnic groups. There were, e.G., complaints by blacks that “the Irish potato refugees” took away their low-paid jobs. Even the before-last wave of immigrants would argue that they were “true Americans”, while the newly arrived ones were not, were worthless and had to be excluded from polite society.

  9. CaitieCat says

    Also, I don’t find it surprising at all when the oppressed are in turn oppressors.

    My detachment sergeant*, shortly after basic, explained it to me very simply, when I asked why the privates got all the crappy jobs.

    “Private,” he said, “private, it’s very simple, and there are two things that go into making it so.

    “One, shit rolls downhill.

    “Two, shit is sticky.

    “Put those two together, private, and you find that the general, who’s sitting way up at the top of the hill, takes a dump on the colonel? Well, the colonel takes a dump on his aide, who’s a lieutenant. And the lieutenant takes a dump on her sergeant. And the sergeant shits all over the corporal. And the corporal shits all over you.

    “But by the time the corporal’s shit is added to the pile, you’re under seven kinds of shit, rolling downhill faster than you can dodge.

    “Now shut the fuck up and dig, private.”

    * I was a signaller in the Canadian Forces.

  10. dingojack says

    Uh that five kinds of shit. Doesn’t inspire confidence in the Canaian Armed Forces, does it?
    Dingo.

  11. CaitieCat says

    LOL – it’s metric? Would that work?

    Actually, it’s that I left out a few steps, in order to make a shorter, slightly punchier bit. :)

  12. says

    CaitieCat “Been a long, long time since ‘sex change’ was a nice thing to say, Ed.”
    It’s not Ed’s fault. I sold him a copy of the dictionary that I wrote all by myself with no help from anyone:

    Sex change: What you get back when you pay in sex cash.

    I’d sell you a copy, but I can’t until the trial’s over. English is suing me.
     
    Michael Heath “Such thinking also gets a powerful boost when you combine conservatism with an embrace of religionism that not only amplifies such defective thinking, but introduces dogma that justifies the illogical conclusions of such thinking.”
    It’s not “dogma”. It’s merely a set of unquestionable, bedrock, beliefs, that’s all.
    Questioning the unquestionable leads to terrible things. You think it can’t happen? It already did, once. They called it “the 1970s”. That’s right: first, you question tradition and the next thing you know it’s all macramé, streaking, and Billy Beer. Do you really want that? I think not.

  13. blf says

    The sticky shite hypothesis is why it’s important to have a Teflon™ trampoline: When the shite comes in, it bounces off the trampoline (made of Teflon so it doesn’t stick) onto someone else.

    Of course, if the re-targeted shite recipient also has a Teflon trampoline…
    Or a fan…

  14. CaitieCat says

    If they have a fan, we get one of my favourite made-up swear words:

    CRAPSPACKLE!

  15. kellyw. says

    I do not ever recall a blog post or article pointing out the whiteness of a white homophobe. There is a tendency for white gbltq people and supporters to call out black people, specifically emphasizing that the person is black, while curiously not calling out white people for being white homophobes. White gbltq people blamed black people for the failure of same sex marriage in California. When same sex marriage failed in Maine in 2009, a place overwhelmingly filled with white people, white gbltq people were not specifically blaming white homophobes for the failure. I’m not comfortable with a bunch of privileged white people calling out race when this is a matter of homophobia. Challenge her talking points, but don’t use her race as a cudgel against her. If she was a white woman, or even a white man, how would you address her points?

  16. dingojack says

    Kelly – to recap:

    “Here we have a good example in a column by Crystal Wright, a black woman who thinks that gay people should be denied the equal rights that her ancestors fought for, and uses the same arguments used by those who opposed the equality she now seeks to deny to others.”

    [Ed quotes, extensively, Ms Wright’s argument’]

    “Which is exactly the same argument made against civil rights for black people. And women. A black woman, of all people, really should be more careful about declaring that giving equal rights to others is a bad thing”.

    I think your reading comprehension difficulties got in the way of Ed’s criticism of Ms Wright’s rank hypocrisy.

    Dingo

  17. says

    I remember after Prop 8 was passed in California seeing a video of an African-American women who voted for it talking about how at one time she wouldn’t have been able to make her voice heard because she was both African-American and a woman, but now she can make her voice heard… “To be the one doing the discriminating?” was my immediate reaction.

  18. kellyw. says

    @ Dingo

    I read Wright’s screed. Nowhere in the article did she mention her race. The only reason I know Wright is black is because Ed mentioned it. All of her talking points are of the conservative agenda.

    It’s entirely possible for a marginalized person to be a bigot when it comes to other people’s oppression. For example, the white glbtq community, who really should know better because of the oppression they face (and I’m calling them out on this as a white gay woman), are excluding people of color with their words and actions. The white glbtq community has done a lot to stereotype black people as uniquely homophobic. This keeps the glbtq movement largely white, and that’s a problem. Every single time an article points out that a homophobe is black, it contributes to the stereotype that black people are the ones who are uniquely homophobic.

  19. dingojack says

    Still missing the point there Kelly – keep trying you might just understand it.
    A black person oppressing those she dislikes by using the very same arguments white bigots (and sexists) used against her parents, grandparents and beyond.
    It’s a case of ‘civil rights for me but not for thee’. That’s called hypocrisy.
    As a black person, and a woman, she really should know better.
    Dingo

  20. hunter says

    “[Catholic Charities] chose not to do so rather than stop discriminating.”

    That should be “rather than stop feeding at the government trough.”

  21. Synfandel says

    I think that the current politically correct terminology is “gender reassignment surgery”.

    Wait ten minutes.

  22. zmidponk says

    Hmm.

    Gays, who represent less than 3% of our population, are trying to dominate our culture and society. Love whom you want. Love the one you’re with. People don’t really care.

    So what’s the problem with enshrining in law that ‘no-one cares’? That you can marry who you want, and no-one cares that who you’re marrying happens to be the same gender as you? That you can adopt a child, and no-one cares that you’re doing so as one half of a same-gender couple? That you can serve in the armed forces, or join a publicly-funded organisation, or take advantage of tax breaks, or half a hundred other things, and no-one cares whether you’re doing any of this as a straight person, a gay person, or a bisexual person?

  23. Stacy says

    As a black person, and a woman, she really should know better

    We all should know better. Unless you’re in the demographic that is at the absolute top of the heap in your country (an upper-class straight cis WASP male in the US) you have ancestors who’ve been shat upon to varying degrees. (Go back far enough and the WASP’s ancestors were oppressed as well.)

    We tend to think people who’ve been oppressed should be less likely to oppress others. But they aren’t. Because they’re human.

    Being oppressed doesn’t make people magically more empathetic and pro-justice than anyone else. Just makes ‘em oppressed.

  24. dingojack says

    Yes, but having more recently been in that position one would think they would be more likely to realise the bigotry, hence avoid the blatant hypocrisy.
    Dingo

  25. Erp says

    “[Catholic Charities] chose not to do so rather than stop discriminating.”

    That should be “rather than stop feeding at the government trough.”

    Well a bit more than that as the state probably provides many/most of the children being put up for adoption.

    I do think Ed’s example of cross race adoption not being allowed is not equivalent. A closer one would be not allowing non-Whites to adopt through the agency (the children might or might not be white).

  26. khms says

    Yes, but having more recently been in that position one would think they would be more likely to realise the bigotry, hence avoid the blatant hypocrisy.

    You’d think so. But then you see examples like Israel, or Iran, or I’m sure lots of other examples.

    I think it’s really the exact same problem as on the individual level.

    I’m one of those who got shat on repeatedly while, say, approximately school-age. It’s made me more likely to try to solve problems without violence. Yet we all know (for example, from looking at court cases) that the exact same history makes other people into violent bullies who like to shit on other people.

    Or parent-children abuse chains – some people break out, some just continue the chain.

    I don’t know what makes people do one or the other – I just know that both happen.

  27. dingojack says

    And so they get a pass on criticism of their bigotry?
    Dingo
    ——–
    Concerning Israelis particularly, how many experienced bigotry personally. exactly? Round figures.

  28. says

    @30:

    Apparently so. Although it makes me wonder; if someone whose own background includes centuries of bigotry and enslavement doesn’t get it–how the fuck are the rest of us managing to do so?

  29. pacal says

    “Gays, who represent less than 3% of our population, are trying to dominate our culture and society. Love whom you want. Love the one you’re with. People don’t really care.”

    Actually it is painfully obvious those people care very much. Otherwise why would they be so obsessed by the Gay. And Ms. Wright it is obvious that you care very much otherwise why are you getting so hot and bothered.

    But then the whole tenor of your piece, Ms. Wright is an obvious desire to continue to be able to look down on and feel superior to Gay people and to have the law sanction and enforce it.

  30. Stacy says

    And so they get a pass on criticism of their bigotry?

    Who here is saying they should get a pass on criticism of their bigotry?

  31. Michael Heath says

    kellyw writes:

    I read Wright’s screed. Nowhere in the article did she mention her race.

    I measure 3Gs of force on that whoosh.

  32. Matrim says

    While I do agree that African-Americans should be more sensitive to bigotry due to their recent cultural struggles, I also think you have to be careful not to single them out as a culture for bigotry. The fact of the matter is, while bigotry of various stripes is a big problem in the African-American community, it’s a bigger problem in the white community. While its sad that much of the black community who voted on Prop 8 did so in favor of it, many more white folks did. The fact of the matter is that bigotry against homosexuals is stupid and wrong regardless of the race of the bigot, and while we can call out African-Americans for using the language of the racists that oppressed them in the past we should be careful not to single them out for ulterior reasons. I think Ed took the right approach in this post, but too often I’ve seen people focus on the bigotry of blacks while essentially giving whites a pass because the African-Americans “should know better.”

    News flash: everyone should know better.

  33. Michael Heath says

    Matrim writes:

    While I do agree that African-Americans should be more sensitive to bigotry due to their recent cultural struggles, I also think you have to be careful not to single them out as a culture for bigotry.

    You are apparently criticizing Ed for not criticizing other groups’ members for bad behavior simply because he pointed out the bad behavior of a person who belongs to a population whose legacy demands they know better and remains a protected class.

    If not, who exactly do you think needs to increase their framework before they criticize a black person?

    Perhaps understanding the target of your criticism will help me better understand the cogency of your argument. Right now I find this totally un-compelling for one simple reason. We shouldn’t necessarily have to add politically correct context to point out the bad behavior of a person who belongs to a protected class. If an individual or group of individuals is behaving badly, that’s sufficient reason to criticize them. Unless the target of their ire is causing them far more suffering, which is not true here; gays as a population are not persecuting black people where the opposite is certainly true, e.g., the voting demographics of those voting against marriage equality.

  34. Stacy says

    @Matrim, at 4:37

    I think Ed took the right approach in this post, but too often I’ve seen people focus on the bigotry of blacks while essentially giving whites a pass because the African-Americans “should know better.”

    @MH, at 4:51

    You are apparently criticizing Ed for not criticizing other groups’ members for bad behavior simply because he pointed out the bad behavior of a person who belongs to a population whose legacy demands they know better and remains a protected class

    In conclusion, reading comprehension is a wonderful thing.

  35. says

    Dingo,

    Doesn’t shit roll uphill in your part of the world?

    You knew I was going to say that.

    To be continued….

  36. Matrim says

    @Stacy #37>

    Indeed it is. Although there is one part of my post I am disappointed in, the fact that I used “the fact of the matter is” twice in one paragraph. In my defense I was writing on my phone which makes it difficult to review and edit effectively. O_o”

    @Michael #36> I was not criticizing Ed, as Stacy pointed out. What I’m saying is that people need to check their reasons for picking targets for their criticism. To use a related example, it’s like people who quite vocally complain about the misogyny and violence of rap music while entirely ignoring the misogyny and violence of country music, or heavy metal, or any other musical genre you care to name that has misogyny and violence. While people may indeed actually be concerned with misogyny and violence (which are important issues, to be sure), the focus on a type of music that is culturally tied to a specific class of people to the exclusion of others can indicate that it’s something other than misogyny or violence driving them (holy crap I’m getting sick of typing “misogyny and violence”).

    The same goes for people who rage about woman-beating man-child Chris Brown for having a career after knocking around his pop-star girlfriend, but will happily go see a movie starring woman-beating man-child Sean Penn after knocking around his pop-star girlfriend. I’m not saying race is always the issue at hand (you might like Sean Penn for his politics and dislike Chris Brown for his…whatever they are…or any number of other factors), but you have to be cognizant of why you are leveling criticism at someone or some group specifically to the exclusion of others.

    Of course we should criticize anti-gay bigotry when we see it, but there are two things we should keep in mind when we do. The first is keep in my why we are doing it (as I just outlined). And the second is to keep in mind who is actually doing the oppressing. While the black community certainly isn’t helping the LGBTQ community as a whole, it’s not the black community that is keeping them oppressed. The anti-gay movement in America is overwhelmingly a white movement. While the positions many in the black community take toward LGBTQ people are reprehensible, and rightly should be criticized (I never suggested anything else), it’s not them that are making LGBTQ people second-class citizens.

  37. Michael Heath says

    Matrim writes:

    While the black community certainly isn’t helping the LGBTQ community as a whole, it’s not the black community that is keeping them oppressed.

    Not true on two counts, one which I raised prior to your false assertion here. The black community is one of the demographic groups who predominately votes against gay rights. E.g. as already noted – their predominately voting against gay marriage in 2008; where they turned out big to also vote for Barack Obama for president in that same election in Nov-2008. Additionally, black gay men are frequently ostracized in their communities; perhaps even as bad or worse then they are in fundie Christian cliques.

    My criticism of your original post stands. Especially given that your criticism of singling out Ms. Wright was based on the false premise that the black community isn’t keeping GBLTs, “oppressed”. They most certainly are, both culturally and in regards to the protection of their rights.

  38. Matrim says

    @41> Oh, ffs, can you point out exactly where I criticized anyone for pointing out that Wright’s language mirrors that of the anti-civil rights bigots that opposed racial integration? No, because I haven’t criticized anyone for any such thing. If you’d actually read either of my posts you might have recognized this. Your criticism of my original post doesn’t stand, because you were criticizing something I didn’t say.

    And, no, it isn’t the black community keeping the LGBTQ community down. Yes, there is bigotry in the black community. Yes, it is wrong. Yes, it is a problem. No, they are not the primary party responsible. African-Americans make up about 12.5% of the population, and a relatively small fraction of that group can or will vote. Again, I’ll point out to you that the anti-LGBTQ movement is overwhelmingly white. I never disagreed that the black community, as a whole, tends to vote against LGBTQ rights, but that doesn’t mean that they are the primary force against them.

    And I’d be interested in seeing your data about the treatment of homosexuals in the black community vs the treatment of fundamentalist Christian community. Most of the research I’ve seen has been fairly broad, but generally showed the opposite of what you’re saying. Still, I’d be happy to read more on the issue if you have something in mind.

  39. Michael Heath says

    Matrim writes:

    No, they [black voters] are not the primary party responsible.

    Disingenuity as a method of avoidance is not tolerated well in this forum. No one here argued that black voters are the biggest anti-gay right voting block; that would denial or ignorance on a massive scale. Instead and as I’ve repeatedly noted, black voters and the black community are not supportive and tolerant of gay rights in their voting patterns and gays culturally. The fact this reality exists destroys the core premise of your criticism of some un-named target that’s supposedly not Ed, who is the person who raised the very framework you criticize.

    If you want your posts to resonate you’re going to have use sufficiently framed factually true premises relevant to the conclusion your promoting; and name names if you’re going to criticize others. Sloppy argumentation doesn’t do well here. On the other hand if you actually care about making cogent arguments, I suggest continuing to hang out here. Many of the contributors make very insightful beautifully crafted arguments, including our resident blogger.

  40. slc1 says

    Re Matrim

    In fact, to buttress MH’s comment, the large turnout in California of Afro-American voters in 2008 because of Obama’s presence on the national ticket, who also voted strongly in favor of Prop. 8 to deny same sex marriage rights almost certainly provided the margin of victory for that proposition.

    It should be noted that the statute in Maryland barely passed the lower house because of opposition of Democrats in Prince Georges Co., which is almost 60% Afro-American. The endorsement of the proposition in the referendum by Obama probably reduced the opposition in the Afro-American community, despite the overwhelming opposition of the Afro-American preachers there. just enough to put the passing of the referendum over the top.

  41. Matrim says

    Disingenuity as a method of avoidance is not tolerated well in this forum.

    Said the person who was being disingenuous about my position. I said that it isn’t the black community keeping the LGBTQ community down. You said that it was and point out their voting record as evidence of your claim. I, in turn, pointed out that their voting bloc isn’t responsible for the systematic oppression of LGBTQ people and that while there is a large problem in the black community, it’s quantitatively insignificant compared to the problem in the white community. I fail to see at what point I’m being disingenuous. I wasn’t insinuating anything you didn’t say. Noting that a group takes a position has no bearing on whether or not they are the ones responsible for perpetuating it. Again, I tell you, the anti-homosexual movement is largely a white movement. And so far you have not offered a shred of evidence to dispute that. I already agreed that the African-American community has major issues when it comes to anti-LGBTQ bigotry, but the point is that it isn’t African-Americans who are the big problem. And the real pisser is that this is mostly secondary to the point I was originally making.

    You’ve largely ignored my points, and have adopted a stance of simple denial and smug superiority. You’ve consistently talked about “the framework of my criticism” without seeming to acknowledge you know what the hell I’m talking about, or the fact that I’ve tried to explain it to you multiple times. You’ve asserted several times now that your “criticism of my central point” stands effectively attempting to claim intellectual victory by fiat without actually addressing my point. And yet you have the unmitigated gall to attempt to lecture me on being disingenuous? And your snide insinuation that I’m new here and thus don’t know the ropes is both insulting and ignorant. I agree that many of the contributors, Ed included, make insightful and beautifully crafted arguments. Yours is not one of them.

  42. CaitieCat says

    Just to put it out there, that same Prop-8 victory for the bigots was majority-funded by the Mormons, hardly a bastion of African-America.

  43. says

    Not to clear the air, but I don’t amember anyone saying that there AREN’T a fuckton of white bigots who be hatin’ on teh GAY.

    Ms. Wright appears to be condoning oppression of those of whom she disapproves. I have to think that she’s educated to at least the degree of a college diploma. Doing that which she is doing is not excusable.

  44. dingojack says

    Pew survey taken on 4-15 April 2012:
    Do you favour or oppose allowing gay and lesbian couples to marry legally?
    White*: oppose 43, favour 47 (2013 favour 49)**
    Black*: oppose 49, favour 39 (2013 favour 38)**

    Dingo
    ——–
    * excluding Hispanic
    ** see here and here

  45. Ichthyic says

    The only reason I know Wright is black is because Ed mentioned it.

    really?

    I got it from the fact she advertises it as part of her “selling point” right under her picture:

    Crystal Wright is a black conservative woman living in Washington, D.C. Some would say she is a triple minority: woman, black and a Republican living in a Democrat dominated city. By day, Crystal is a communications consultant and editor and publisher of the new website, http://www.conservativeblackchick.com. Ms. Wright holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from Georgetown University and a Masters of Fine Arts in Theatre from Virginia Commonwealth University.

    you’re really off on the wrong track here.

  46. dingojack says

    “By day, Crystal is a [mild-mannered] communications consultant …”

    but by night she becomes DC’s latest superhero – THE FLAMING BIGOT!

    :D Dingo

  47. Ichthyic says

    You’ve largely ignored my points, and have adopted a stance of simple denial and smug superiority.

    That IS a rather common characteristic of Heath.

    it’s quantitatively insignificant compared to the problem in the white community.

    and this is absolutely accurate.

    Do you favour or oppose allowing gay and lesbian couples to marry legally?
    White*: oppose 43, favour 47 (2013 favour 49)**
    Black*: oppose 49, favour 39 (2013 favour 38)**

    which while good to know, ignores the point Matrim made. Do recall that “Black” is still a significant minority in the US, and just the differences in population composition more than make up for the slight differences in those poll numbers.

    8 to deny same sex marriage rights almost certainly provided the margin of victory for that proposition.

    the real culprit with prop 8 was out of state interests, most significantly Mormon.

  48. dingojack says

    Ichthyic – Hey don’t blame me for injecting some real numbers into the thread!
    And it depends on what you’re arguing doesn’t it?
    Are we arguing over the number of votes cast, (the black voters would expected to be a minority of all voters, because they make up approximately 12.85% of the total population [although blacks made up 13% of the voters during the 2012 Presiential election]), or are we arguing over whether the level of support for marriage equality is significantly lower amongst blacks as opposed to whites (a measure of the two group’s relative levels of anti-equality bigotry)? *
    If the former then I’d remind you that small number of key voters in swing-seats can have a disproportionate effect on electoral outcomes (especially in FPP elections). If the later then I’d point out that approval amongst black, as opposed to white, populations is significantly lower (> 90% confidence level based on 2013 approvals).
    Dingo
    ——–
    * Neither of which was talking about. I was talking about the poor quality of their anti-equality arguments

  49. Ichthyic says

    Ichthyic – Hey don’t blame me for injecting some real numbers into the thread!

    if you look carefully, I didn’t.

    Are we arguing over the number of votes cast, (the black voters would expected to be a minority of all voters, because they make up approximately 12.85% of the total population

    considering that Matrim already mentioned that…

    If the former then I’d remind you that small number of key voters in swing-seats can have a disproportionate effect on electoral outcomes (especially in FPP elections)

    …and there are way more white voters than black, overwhelmingly so.

    are you getting this yet?

  50. says

    Caitie Cat:

    Yes, thank you for that information. I did not know that, and I certainly ought to given that we have had two transgender bloggers on this network (and still have one), from whom I have learned a great deal — but apparently not quite enough. I appreciate the gentle and informative correction.

  51. CaitieCat says

    You’re most welcome, Ed; to my awareness, you’ve earned the assumption of good faith error by consistent actions concomitant with the dignity of the marginalized. :)

  52. says

    FWIW, my roommate was at a party about a year ago where he was talking to an African-American woman who held a lot of Black Power beliefs (either Five-Percent Nation or similar) who was absolutely convinced that homosexuality was purely an invention of degenerate white culture that was introduced into the black community like a cultural virus and simply would not exist otherwise.

    My roommate didn’t think it was worth trying to argue the point with her, and I’m sure there isn’t a huge overlap in ideology between the Five Percenters and this conservative commentator, but I wonder how prevalent the idea is in the Black community that being gay is an evil lifestyle choice being propagated by white culture, as opposed to a biological orientation that exists in every group and culture, whether it’s openly acknowledged or driven underground.

    I’m also reminded of the anti-HIV campaigns I used to hear on the radio in SF targeted to the African-American community that always used the phrase “men who have sex with men” rather than “gay men” because of the stigma and denial associated with being gay in that community leading men to have sex with other men “on the down-low” while steadfastly claiming to be heterosexual, even to themselves.

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