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The Disturbing Story of Kamran Rizvi

You should read this. It’s a moving and disturbing story about Kamran Rizvi, who has gone from a political prisoner of the dictator General Mohammed Zia-ul-Haq of Pakistan to a human rights adviser to Benazir Bhutto to an impoverished immigrant working at a gas station in America. It includes this story:

In 1995, when Benazir Bhutto was prime minister, Rizvi wanted to dilute the provisions of the blasphemy law under which any perceived insult to the Quran could mean a jail term for years, and was often misused by people to get rivals out of the way. A court had recently sentenced three Christians to death under this act. Among the convicted was a 14 year old. The case got wide media attention, including in the international press.

“We must save these guys,” Bhutto told Rizvi, on a hot summer day in May before she left for a tour of Europe. He agreed. There was ample evidence that the local land mafia had created a fictitious case against these hapless Christians. With connivance of the local police, these elements wanted to get the three out of the way to grab the land and build a mall. The charge was that they had insulted Islam, a broad allegation without evidence.

Rizvi worked with government lawyers to file an appeal. A couple of months later, just as he was about to leave for lunch, he got a call. A group of German officials from the embassy wanted to see him.

He decided to make it quick. Instead, that meeting went on for more than an hour. The Germans had decided to offer asylum to the three men. They were especially concerned about the boy.

Rizvi went home after that to have a quick lunch with his wife, Nasreen. He decided to ask her opinion, as he had on several occasions. “What do you think will happen at the courts? They always convict people accused of blasphemy. If you want to save them, let them go,” she said. Rizvi agreed.

Discretion was key – otherwise, extremist elements would try their best to stop the three from getting out of Pakistan. The government lawyers had succeeded in getting bail for the three people – and they had been given police protection during this time. Rizvi had urged the complainant to take back the complaint.

Rizvi called up his driver and instructed him to go straight to the German embassy. A plan was made – the three men would board a flight to Frankfurt in a week. On that day, Rizvi’s secretary, Tauqir Khan, went to the house where the three were put up and took them to the airport. They were put in the plane. Rizvi had earlier talked to Bhutto – she had agreed to the plan. Before leaving the boy hugged Rizvi. “You saved me,” he said and then was off. Moments later the flight took off to Bonn. He’s certain that his involvement saved their lives. “It was,” he says, “a very satisfying feeling.”

But word got around that he had arranged for them to get out of the country and he was then targeted by Muslim extremists. Mullahs issued fatwas ordering him to be killed. He and his family fled to the United States and were granted asylum, but he could not find work with any of the human rights organizations he applied with. He ended up working an overnight shift at a 7/11. He’s managed to find work to support himself now, but it’s tragic that someone who did so much to fight for human rights in a country where that concept is foreign has been subject to such hardship.

Comments

  1. iangould says

    “….a country where that concept is foreign …”

    Ah, Ed, you were doing so well up to that point.

  2. StevoR : Free West Papua, free Tibet, let the Chagossians return! says

    @ ^ iangould : Where is that wrong? You think human rights are commonly accepted there?

  3. StevoR : Free West Papua, free Tibet, let the Chagossians return! says

    Alos did youactually read the story here?

    Pakistan sentences people to death for their beliefs.

    A murder got cheered by adoring crowds there because the person he murdered was oppose dto sharia law and killing apostates.

    This, Pakistan, is the nation that sheltered Osama bin Laden for ten years or so and helped found the Taliban. A nation created by a bunch of Muslim extremists from the old British India specifically on grounds of religious intolerance and zeal for “purity” which is what its name literally means. (Pakistan contains the Indus river from which India was named as interesting side trivia and also used to include Bangladesh until it failed to help them well enough after a major hurricane / typhoon disaster circa the 1970s.)

    Yeah I think its therefore fair to say human rights is a foreign notion over there.

  4. StevoR : Free West Papua, free Tibet, let the Chagossians return! says

    O’course that’s : Also did you actually read the story here?

    Typos.

    Also do you actually know anything about Pakistan and its history and culture?

  5. Nick Gotts (formerly KG) says

    Yeah I think its therefore fair to say human rights is a foreign notion over there. – StevoR

    Yeah, but we know you’re a racist shitbag – we expect better of Ed.

  6. StevoR : Free West Papua, free Tibet, let the Chagossians return! says

    A murderer got cheered by adoring crowds there because the person he murdered was opposed to sharia law and killing apostates.

    See :

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/06/world/asia/06pakistan.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

    Exceprt :

    As the 26-year-old assassin, Malik Mumtaz Qadri, appeared before a magistrate in Islamabad, to be charged with murder and terrorism, he was showered by hundreds of supporters with rose petals and garlands. Moderate religious leaders refused to condemn the assassination, and some hard-line religious leaders appeared obliquely to condone the attack. ..(snip) .. At a market in Islamabad on Tuesday, Mr. Qadri pumped more than 20 rounds into Mr. Taseer’s back, Pakistani media reported, and yet was not fired on by any other member of the security detail, raising still more questions about whether any of the others knew of his plans in advance. Mr. Qadri immediately surrendered, called himself a “slave of the Prophet,” and indicated that he had killed Mr. Taseer for his campaign against the blasphemy law.

    Human rights – would include the right to freely express religious or secular views and not get murdered for doing so wouldn’t they?

    There’s plenty to suggest Pakistan is far from accepting of human rights culturally and at a government level.

  7. StevoR : Free West Papua, free Tibet, let the Chagossians return! says

    @5. Nick Gotts (formerly KG) : FYI. I hate racism and racists – this has absolutely NOTHING to do with race – a notion I don’t believe in at all anyway.

    So don’t lie about or strawperson me ‘k?

    Is that really too much to expect?

    Are you are so deluded as to deny reality and think Pakistan where murderers of secularists are cheered by massive crowds and where Osama bin fuckin Laden made a happy home next to a fuckin’ military base for a decade or so is fine and dandy human rights~wise?

    You that much of a fool KG?

  8. says

    Nick Gotts (formerly KG) is an idiot….or perhaps a Muslim blinded by his religious bias (not one and the same, of course, but pretty damn close).

    Pakistan is a country that was founded by Muslim bigots who did not want to share a state with their Hindu neighbors…..its very existence is a human rights violation.

  9. Michael Heath says

    StevoR writes:

    Yeah I think its therefore fair to say human rights is a foreign notion over there.

    Did you not read the story? The three Christians were rescued by Pakistanis. It’d be fair to say human rights is a foreign notion to religionists – especially fundamentalists. Where that’s true to varying degrees across the entire globe, including the U.S.

  10. dogmeat says

    I’d say condemning an entire country of 180 million people is a bit extreme. The people whose lives are being threatened are Pakistani, the people who helped to rescue them are Pakistani, the people who are trying to imprison and kill them are Pakistani. Your argument paints all of them, victim, ally, and villain with a broad brush of guilt. That is a simplistic and foolish thing to do, much like nuking Iran and killing millions.

    Also, while you may not be a racist StevoR, you have definitely presented yourself as an Islamophobe.

    —————————-
    dalehusband @8

    Actually Nick isn’t an idiot, perhaps you haven’t been around for the utterly idiotic, oft bloodthirsty, and irrationally anti-Islamic arguments made by some of the resident Islamophobes? The talk of killing millions of people and irradiating entire regions is the cornerstone of policy positions presented by a few of these guys.

  11. iangould says

    Then again considering the massive disregard for human rights the government of Pakistan shows with its drone strikes and its decades of support for successive military juntas in the US on American territory maybe Ed has a point.

  12. iangould says

    That should read;

    Then again considering the massive disregard for human rights the government of Pakistan shows with its drone strikes on American territory and its decades of support for successive military juntas in the US maybe Ed has a point.

  13. iangould says

    My computer appears to have eaten a previous post of mine.

    The key points:

    1. Apostasy and blasphemy laws are an appalling abuse of human rights. So are capital punishment, drug prohibition, extraordinary rendition and torture as employed at Bagram and Abu Graib, and civil seizure of assets without due process of law. So is the mandatory detention of asylum seekers in Australia.

    2. When we rightly condemn those abuses we don;t go that next step and conclude that human rights is a foreign concept in the US or Australia.

    3. That’s because saying that human rights is “a foreign concept” is pure orientalism. Back when I was studying Asian studies in the early 90′s I kept hearing how how human rights and democracy were incsonistent with Asian/Confucian values and that the Taiwanese, South Koreeans, Indonesians, Filipinos et cetera didn’t REALLY want democracy. It was bullshit then and its bullshit now. It’s bullshit when Al Qaida says democracy is inconsistent with Islam, it’s bullshit when Lee Kwan Yu says it in Singapore; it’s bullshit when the CPC says it in China and its bullshit when Ed says it.

  14. matthewhodson says

    Welcome to America the land of the free.
    Your job will be to hand out the freedom sugar water.

  15. lofgren says

    Rizvi should borrow some money from his parents so he can go back to school and get training in a more lucrative career. It’s called personal responsibility.

  16. Nick Gotts (formerly KG) says

    I’m taking the liberty of reposting this comment by iangould, which I think he posted on the wrong thread (it’s #29 on the Ray Comfort one):

    For the egregiously stupid:

    1. Apostasy and blasphemy laws are are a breach of fundamental human rights and should be condemned and opposed.

    2. Capital punishment, drug prohibition, civil seizure of private property under “proceeds of crime” laws are also egregious violations of human rights. So is the mandatory detention of asylum seekers here in Australia. This doesn’t mean the concept of human rights is foreign to the US or Australia.

    3. The idea that human rights is “foreign” to Pakistan is pure orientalism. When I was studying Asian
    Studies back in the early 90-’s I kept hearing that democracy and human rights were inconsistent with East Asian/Confucian cultures and that the Taiwanese, South Koreans, Indonesians, Filipinos et cetera didn’t REALLY want democracy. It was bullshit then and its bullshit now.

    QFT.

    StevoR, dalehusband, it gives me a warm glow inside to be considered a fool by such a pair of bigoted fuckwits. Kamran Rizvi, a Pakistani, risked his life for human rights. Many other Pakistanis have done so and in some cases, lost them. StevoR, OTOH, has called for genocide against Muslims – he now says he was drunk at the time, but decent people don’t favour genocide even when drunk. And SteveoR, the fact that you repeatedly say you don’t believe in the notion of race is part of your style of racism – one that is now perhaps more popular than the old biological variety. Races are real, in that what race you belong to has a huge influence on your life-chances – but they are a social and not a biological reality. Denying this social reality makes you a racist.

    Both of you have a profound ignorance of history. Pakistan was indeed founded by Muslims who did not want to live in a Hindu-dominated country, but the blame for partition is distributed fairly evenly between Muslims, Hindus, and the British, who used the classic imperialist strategy of divide-and-rule throughout the history of the Raj. Mohammad Ali Jinnah was far from a Muslim extremist – he was an Ismaili Shia by upbringing, and not religiously observant. You could start your education about the complex historical processes leading to the tragedy of partition here and in the article on Jinnah I linked to, but I don’t suppose you’ll bother – mouthing simplistic slogans is so much easier, and to such as you, more emotionally satisfying.

    As for:

    Pakistan is a country that was founded by Muslim bigots who did not want to share a state with their Hindu neighbors…..its very existence is a human rights violation. – dalehusband

    We could at least as validly say:
    “The USA was founded by white bigots who did not want any restrictions on their programme of stealing the land from its indigenous inhabitants, which they and their descendants pushed through to a conclusion, frequently committing mass murder in the process…. its very existence is a human rights violation.”

    Finally, grim though the human rights situation is in Pakistan, there are also reasons to be hopeful. The country has just had its first ever transition from one democratically elected government to another, and 60% of the electorate came out to vote in defiance of the Taliban. The judiciary and the media, in sharp contrast to the situation even ten years ago, are fiercely independent of the government. And in direct contradiction to your claims, and Ed Brayton’s, there are of course a number of human rights organisations based in Pakistan. Of course, according to you, these can’t possibly exist, as “that concept is foreign” to the country.

  17. Nick Gotts (formerly KG) says

    (Reposting after taking alink out – I got the limit wrong.)

    I’m taking the liberty of reposting this comment by iangould, which I think he posted on the wrong thread (it’s #29 on the Ray Comfort one):

    For the egregiously stupid:

    1. Apostasy and blasphemy laws are are a breach of fundamental human rights and should be condemned and opposed.

    2. Capital punishment, drug prohibition, civil seizure of private property under “proceeds of crime” laws are also egregious violations of human rights. So is the mandatory detention of asylum seekers here in Australia. This doesn’t mean the concept of human rights is foreign to the US or Australia.

    3. The idea that human rights is “foreign” to Pakistan is pure orientalism. When I was studying Asian
    Studies back in the early 90-’s I kept hearing that democracy and human rights were inconsistent with East Asian/Confucian cultures and that the Taiwanese, South Koreans, Indonesians, Filipinos et cetera didn’t REALLY want democracy. It was bullshit then and its bullshit now.

    QFT.

    StevoR, dalehusband, it gives me a warm glow inside to be considered a fool by such a pair of bigoted fuckwits. Kamran Rizvi, a Pakistani, risked his life for human rights. Many other Pakistanis have done so and in some cases, lost them. StevoR, OTOH, has called for genocide against Muslims – he now says he was drunk at the time, but decent people don’t favour genocide even when drunk. And SteveoR, the fact that you repeatedly say you don’t believe in the notion of race is part of your style of racism – one that is now perhaps more popular than the old biological variety. Races are real, in that what race you belong to has a huge influence on your life-chances – but they are a social and not a biological reality. Denying this social reality makes you a racist.

    Both of you have a profound ignorance of history. Pakistan was indeed founded by Muslims who did not want to live in a Hindu-dominated country, but the blame for partition is distributed fairly evenly between Muslims, Hindus, and the British, who used the classic imperialist strategy of divide-and-rule throughout the history of the Raj. Mohammad Ali Jinnah was far from a Muslim extremist – he was an Ismaili Shia by upbringing, and not religiously observant. You could start your education about the complex historical processes leading to the tragedy of partition here and in the article on Jinnah, but I don’t suppose you’ll bother – mouthing simplistic slogans is so much easier, and to such as you, more emotionally satisfying.

    As for:

    Pakistan is a country that was founded by Muslim bigots who did not want to share a state with their Hindu neighbors…..its very existence is a human rights violation. – dalehusband

    We could at least as validly say:
    “The USA was founded by white bigots who did not want any restrictions on their programme of stealing the land from its indigenous inhabitants, which they and their descendants pushed through to a conclusion, frequently committing mass murder in the process…. its very existence is a human rights violation.”

    Finally, grim though the human rights situation is in Pakistan, there are also reasons to be hopeful. The country has just had its first ever transition from one democratically elected government to another, and 60% of the electorate came out to vote in defiance of the Taliban. The judiciary and the media, in sharp contrast to the situation even ten years ago, are fiercely independent of the government. And in direct contradiction to your claims, and Ed Brayton’s, there are of course a number of human rights organisations based in Pakistan. Of course, according to you, these can’t possibly exist, as “that concept is foreign” to the country.

  18. says

    Back in 1976 I worked the night shift at a 7/11. Unless the job has changed drastically in that time, he isn’t a lot safer where he is now.

  19. StevoR : Free West Papua, free Tibet, let the Chagossians return! says

    @10. dogmeat : “I’d say condemning an entire country of 180 million people is a bit extreme.”

    So would I and its NOT what I’m doing here.

    I’m not condemning the entire country but making a factual observation.

    Human rights and Islamic culture aren’t really compatible given y’know the whole Sharia law thi8ng and the Islamist hatred for anyone disgareewing with or mocking them or thinking differently. Exghibit A : Malal Yousafzai, Exhibit B. Salman Rushdie, Exhibt C. The danish Cartoons controverys and a thoudand and one other such cases.

    See :

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_rights_in_Pakistan#Religious_intolerance_against_Pakistani_Christians_by_Islamists

    In Pakistan, 1.5% of the population are Christian. Pakistani law mandates that any “blasphemies” of the Quran are to be met with punishment. On July 28, 1994, Amnesty International urged Pakistan’s Prime Minister, Benazir Bhutto (NB. PM at the time later murdered by Islamist extremists probably with highlevel complicity -ed)) to change the law because it was being used to terrorize religious minorities. She tried, but was unsuccessful. However, she modified the laws to make them more moderate. Her changes were reversed by the Nawaz Sharif administration which was backed by Religious/Political parties. .. (long listof incidents snipped -ed) .. Based, in part, on such incidents, Pakistan was recommended by the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF) in May 2006 to be designated as a “Country of Particular Concern” (CPC) by the Department of State.

    You do understand what accepting theeveidnce and relaity means right?

    Yeah, a lot of Pakistanis are victims of, well, the other more extremist Pakistanis. Human rights situation in Pakistan incl. esp. freedom of religion – & right to having no religion is dire. Pakistan is not a nationwhere human rights are widely accepted.

    You seriously going to deny that?

    If so, lets have some extraordinary evidence for your extraordinary claim.

  20. StevoR : Free West Papua, free Tibet, let the Chagossians return! says

    @17.

    StevoR, dalehusband, it gives me a warm glow inside to be considered a fool by such a pair of bigoted fuckwits. Kamran Rizvi, a Pakistani, risked his life for human rights. Many other Pakistanis have done so and in some cases, lost them.

    Which proves my point exactly doesn’t it?

    You say I’m racist – and Ed is and dalehusband is because we make the observation that Pakistan doesn’t respect human rights.

    Yet you cite as your chosen counter example a case of, well, Pakistan NOT respecting human rights and people in Pakistan incl. Kamran Rizvi who are fighting for human rights getting killed or persecuted because of that. Thanks for helping make my case for me out I guess.

    StevoR, OTOH, has called for genocide against Muslims – he now says he was drunk at the time, but decent people don’t favour genocide even when drunk.

    I’ve never favoured genocide actually – I have favoured and called for defending ourselves from genocidal Jihadists without pulling any punches at all. I admit I’ve probably gone a bit overboard in the past but, no, I don’t support any genocide at all. Which you should be well aware of by now.

    And SteveoR, the fact that you repeatedly say you don’t believe in the notion of race is part of your style of racism – one that is now perhaps more popular than the old biological variety. Races are real, ..

    Bullshit.

    Races are a social construct without any biological reality to them which means they aren’t real. Its just that some people – like you it seems – haven’t quote comprehended that reality yet. All humans are human. One species not many. Race is bullshit. Skin colour is irrelevant. and if to too many that’s not understood to be the case we should fucken well educate them into accepting that biological reality.

    Oh & learn to spell my nym correctly kindly would ya KGB? (Hey, you can add a letter, I can add a letter.)

    Mohammad Ali Jinnah was far from a Muslim extremist – he was an Ismaili Shia by upbringing, and not religiously observant.

    Explaining why the nation was segregated – created – by religious division and named “Land of the pure” I spose?

    Finally, grim though the human rights situation is in Pakistan, there are also reasons to be hopeful. The country has just had its first ever transition from one democratically elected government to another, and 60% of the electorate came out to vote in defiance of the Taliban. The judiciary and the media, in sharp contrast to the situation even ten years ago, are fiercely independent of the government. And in direct contradiction to your claims, and Ed Brayton’s, there are of course a number of human rights organisations based in Pakistan. Of course, according to you, these can’t possibly exist, as “that concept is foreign” to the country.

    Yes. The concept of human rights came about in the Western world and has since now spread to Pakistan by a few who’ve wisely adopted the idea. That means it is indeed “foreign” to Pakistanis.

    You going to claim the notion of Human Rights was invented in Pakistan and not enlightenment Europe now eh?

    Signs of hope for Pakistan – I hope so. Taken them fucken long enough. It also means and is linked with their culture hopefully changing and becoming Westernised or even to use the old term “Americanised” – which given its connections with improved human rights, democracy and freedom of expression is called a fucken good thing. Or do youpreferand think equal a culture where schoolgirls are shot and poisoned (read any Talsima Nasreen btw?) for wanting an education and brutal sharia law and Islamist theocracy reigns supreme?

    it gives me a warm glow inside to be considered a fool by such a pair of bigoted fuckwits.

    Ah, no worries.

    I hold you in the highest esteem too – NOT!

    Seeing what you did here and sounding it out word by word, maybe, just maybe you’ll understand why.

  21. StevoR : Free West Papua, free Tibet, let the Chagossians return! says

    ^ That’s @ 16 & #17. Nick Gotts (formerly KG) naturally.

    Oh and typo fix :

    Or do you prefer and think equal a culture where schoolgirls are shot and poisoned (read any Taslima Nasreen btw?) for wanting an education and brutal sharia law and Islamist theocracy reigns supreme?

    Go on answer the fookin’ question please! I dare ya!

  22. Nick Gotts (formerly KG) says

    StevoR,

    Which proves my point exactly doesn’t it?

    No. Because Ed’s claim, which you supported, was that human rights is a foreign concept in Pakistan.

    You say I’m racist – and Ed is and dalehusband is because we make the observation that Pakistan doesn’t respect human rights.

    Anyone can make a racist remark, but someone who does so as consistently as you is a racist. And, as I already noted, you are lying about what claim I objected to.

    I’ve never favoured genocide actually

    A bare-faced lie, as many here will know. Advocating nuking whole countries is advocating genocide, and that’s what you did.

    I have favoured and called for defending ourselves from genocidal Jihadists without pulling any punches at all.

    By which you mean, as you’ve made abundantly clear, being willing to kill large numbers of innocent people. You’re as much a fanatic without respect for human rights as any jihadi – you just lack the ability to put your disgusting fantasies into practice.

    Races are a social construct without any biological reality to them which means they aren’t real.

    Look, shit-for-brains, money is a social construct. Is it not real? Laws are a social construct. Are they not real? Shariah is a social construct – so if social constructs are not real, what the fuck are you objecting to in your constant anti-Shariah tirades?

    Explaining why the nation was segregated – created – by religious division and named “Land of the pure” I spose?

    I gave you starting points to educate yourself, but as expected, you choose not to take that opportunity.

    You going to claim the notion of Human Rights was invented in Pakistan and not enlightenment Europe now eh?

    Actually, anti-colonial movements were crucial to the development of the concept, and in practice if not in theory, European colonialists – including the settlers of Australia – treated all non-Europeans as without rights or at best, with very limited rights. But if a concept is “foreign” to everywhere except where it was invented, then elections, the rule of law, rational inquiry, mathematics, writing and agriculture are all foreign to western Europe.

    Or do you prefer and think equal a culture where schoolgirls are shot and poisoned (read any Taslima Nasreen btw?) for wanting an education and brutal sharia law and Islamist theocracy reigns supreme?

    Go on answer the fookin’ question please! I dare ya!

    I would most certainly like to see the culture of Pakistan radically changed. I would also like to see the culture of the west, and notably the USA, radically changed, so no, I do not want Pakistan “westernised” or “Americanised”; I want freedom, equality and the sustainable use of resources throughout the world. Given its much greater power and its enormously greater use of limited resources, the current culture of the USA is in fact a far greater obstacle to that goal than that of Pakistan, vile though the latter is in many ways.

  23. iangould says

    “Yes. The concept of human rights came about in the Western world and has since now spread to Pakistan by a few who’ve wisely adopted the idea. That means it is indeed “foreign” to Pakistanis. ”

    Darn right, for example, that half-naked fakir Gandhi had no roel in the development of the concept of human rights.

    Actually, most of the modern view of human rights can b traced back to British and French scholars of the 18th century.

    So by your definition it’s also a foreign concept to Americans, Russians and Australians,

    You know, like how you have ot be Austrian to fully comprehend special relativity or English to understand evolution.

    Also, those people the US regularly abducts and tortures are mostly from countries where human rights is “a foreign concept” so it’s no bid deal.

    Kamran Rivzi seems ot think human rights matter but he’s obviously a freak, an anomaly, a dog walking on its hind legs.

  24. =8)-DX says

    Wow, no one is holding back I see. I agree with Nick and Ian that who did so much to fight for human rights in a country where that concept is foreign
    Is a really bad phrasing (basically conflating “foreign” and “ignorant” and making a blatantly false blanket statement about Pakistanis not knowing anything about human rights as a concept.) I’d assume however that this was mainly just a bad choice of words and hyperbole – it’s one of those phrases we use every day.

  25. dingojack says

    I was reading about something else entirely when this quote leapt out at me:

    “”… an act of barbarism, born of a society which wantonly disregards Individual rights and the value of human life and seeks constantly to expand and dominate other nations,” *

    Sounds familiar, right?
    [ I'm sure MH can tell us who and what. ;) ]

    I guess it’s a lot easier to “condemn them to the ash-heap of history”** when they’re mere untermenschen.

    Dingo
    ——–
    * Seymour Hersh. Target is Destroyed,
    ** So was he denying them the right to exist SLC?

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