Quantcast

«

»

May 14 2013

Moroccan Atheist On the Run

In yet another example of Muslim totalitarians trying to destroy anyone who dares to question or criticize their religion, Moroccan atheist Imad Eddin Habib is now on the run and hiding from the police, who want to arrest him for the “crime” of “shaking a Muslim’s faith.”

Moroccan atheist Imad Eddin Habib is now on the run, after police began searching for him last week. Habib told Irshad Manji‘s Moral Courage TV that officers confronted his father, asking him to bring an end to his son’s activism. Habib is the founder of the Council of Ex-Muslims in Morocco, which aims for the “application of a secular constitution.”…

Atheism is not criminalised in Morocco, but Article 220 of the country’s Penal Code forbids “shaking a Muslim’s faith”. The article’s vague wording can be used to punish anyone who criticises Islam openly, or promotes any other faith with a jail sentence of up to three years. Ahmed Benchemsi wrote that this says that “when you live in Morocco, you can think whatever you want of religion, but you better keep it for yourself.”

His parents have threatened to turn him in to the police, so he is moving from home to home among his friends in an attempt to evade the fascist authorities.

9 comments

Skip to comment form

  1. 1
    Abby Normal

    That’s a scary law. I can’t imagine how difficult it must be to write a school curriculum with a law like that over one’s head. Science, philosophy, literature, history, there’s hardly a subject that wouldn’t need to be significantly abridged.

  2. 2
    Raging Bee

    …who want to arrest him for the “crime” of “shaking a Muslim’s faith.”

    Guilty as charged — that’s the fucking point. (I guess we can start calling this “shaken overgrown baby syndrome.”)

  3. 3
    Pierce R. Butler

    Why can’t Moroccan Muslims use some cement, anchor bolts, and L-braces so their faith doesn’t wobble so much?

  4. 4
    grumpyoldfart

    This is going to continue for decades and maybe for centuries. The control freaks will never give up.

  5. 5
    laurentweppe

    Morocco has the added bonus of being a morachy where the ruling dynasty’s claim of legitimacy comes from descending from Muhammad. Calling for a “seculat constitution” is often interpreted by the Royal Palace as calling for their overthrowing.

  6. 6
    Gregory in Seattle

    @laurentweppe #5 – A very similar argument was used in Great Britain to suppress religious dissent for centuries. Because the Crown was (and still is) Head of the Church of England, speaking against the Church of England was de facto speaking against the Crown. Simply being Catholic, or Quaker, or atheist, or anything like that, meant that your loyalties were deeply suspect.

    It really wasn’t until the 1670 trial of William Penn and William Meade that this began to change; and even then the Crown’s answer was to force dissidents into exile.

  7. 7
    Nick Gotts

    Morocco has the added bonus of being a morachy where the ruling dynasty’s claim of legitimacy comes from descending from Muhammad. – laurentweppe

    According to this wikipedia article, the descendants of Muhammad with a “known”* line of descent run well into the millions, and according to some genealogists, the vast majority of people alive today are probably his descendants.

    *Since most of these supposed lines of descent are predominantly male, a large proportion will contain spurious links.

  8. 8
    laurentweppe

    According to this wikipedia article, the descendants of Muhammad with a “known”* line of descent run well into the millions, and according to some genealogists, the vast majority of people alive today are probably his descendants.

    Yeah, anndas you know dynasts love to have their claims confronted with logic and erudition.

  9. 9
    martinc

    I would have thought hearing Islamic wingnuts preach violence in the name of their ‘peaceful’ religion would be enough to “shake a Muslim’s faith”, so presumably under this law all the fundies in Morocco could be be jailed.

Leave a Reply

Switch to our mobile site