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Apr 30 2013

Multi-Level Marketing for Wingnuts

Ron Paul and Doug Wead are helping push a new multi-level marketing program, apparently for wingnuts who find Amway too difficult to master. Liberty Network Marketing is run by children of both men, with their pictures all over the website.

The website says that they’re bringing this amazing opportunity to libertarian types because, “We want them to have an extra source of income now so that in two years they will have more time and opportunity to work for the Liberty Movement.” And what is it they’re marketing? Isagenix products, which look very much like Herbalife and other health and anti-aging schemes.

For example, it claims that the “Isagenic system supports the body’s natural detoxification process.” As I’ve noted several times before, when a product claims to “cleanse” your body of unspecified “toxins,” you can be pretty sure you’re dealing with some major-league woo. Oh, and it will help you “supercharge your body” because it contains vitamins. Wow, how revolutionary. And one of their products claims to contain “telomere support.” Seriously.

I’m sure those who own the company will make a lot of money. And lots of people who fall for this won’t. And the fact that they don’t will be blamed on lack of effort.

27 comments

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  1. 1
    Doug Little

    telomere support

    Wow that’s impressive, I’d like to see their research on that. Oh what’s that…. they pulled it out of their ass… never mind, nothing to see here, carry on.

  2. 2
    Dunc

    Is anybody else wondering just how much of the right-wing media ecosystem is fundamentally about running scams of one kind or another?

  3. 3
    tubi

    Is anybody else wondering just how much of the right-wing media ecosystem is fundamentally about running scams of one kind or another?

    Have you tries listening to RW christian radio on a Saturday? It’s nothing but house-flippers, memory-boosters, and detoxifiers.

  4. 4
    Gregory in Seattle

    This image is making another of its occasional rounds. It lists the red flags of pseudoscience, but it looks like “Liberty Network Marketing” is using it as a laundry list of marketing points.

  5. 5
    Mr Ed

    Dagnabit I just put all my money into Glen Beck’s gold system.

    telomere support

    I’ve developed a meditation system to increase both the size and quality of telomeres but I’m running into roadblocks by big pharm keeping me from publishing

  6. 6
    Randomfactor

    Is anybody else wondering just how much of the right-wing media ecosystem is fundamentally about running scams of one kind or another?

    Not “wondering” at all.

    http://www.thebaffler.com/past/the_long_con/

    (Seen it close up. A friend of mine is a Fox News Republican and on every sucker list there is. And falls for them again and again.)

  7. 7
    Raging Bee

    First the homeschooling thang, then the renewed BFFness with his old racist chums, and now this. It’s starting to look like Ron Paul is going out of his way to advertize what a sleazy con-artist he is, and always was; and to rub his pathetic fanboys’ faces in how thoroughly he managed to con them all these decades.

  8. 8
    krisrhodes

    I’m so happy, finally a solution for my ever-shortening telomeres!

  9. 9
    ArtK

    Sounds like an Affinity Fraud. The shared ideology is an extra lever for the fraudsters to pry money loose from the victims. It happens with religious/cultural groups all too often. Bernie Madoff is a classic example.

  10. 10
    Raging Bee

    And what’s with these MLMRehab ads I’m suddenly seeing on this page? They’re advertizing MLM on a page mocking MLM as a con? That doesn’t exactly make them look intelligent or credible.

  11. 11
    raven

    Is anybody else wondering just how much of the right-wing media ecosystem is fundamentally about running scams of one kind or another?

    The right wing and fundie xian churches both. Not that there is much difference.

    It is common. Known as affinity group scams.

    Common enough that the Tea Party and Liberarian leaders have warned against it. Because it cuts into their intake of loot of course.

    Much of the money fundies donate is spent on huge mansions, fast cars, jewelry, cute teenage boys and girs, fine wine and drugs, tropical vacations, private jets, and anything else money can buy. Which doesn’t bother me at all. Money spent on a private jet is money not spent trying to overthrow the US government.

  12. 12
    fifthdentist

    “Have you tries listening to RW christian radio on a Saturday?”

    I was driving Saturday evening while the dreadful Prairie Home Companion was on NPR, so out of boredom I turned on some Christian station, and it was American Family Radio (IIRC). It was lousy with speakers pushing their books, or rather “books,” and Christianist products of one sort of another. Because Jesus needs money. Or something.

  13. 13
    fifthdentist

    I’ve also noticed that a heavy advertiser on Christianist radio programs is Cancer Treatment Centers of America. Because irony.

  14. 14
    Doug Little

    It was lousy with speakers pushing their books, or rather “books,” and Christianist products of one sort of another.

    I’ve got some old nails I can sell you.

  15. 15
    Randomfactor

    Because irony.

    Because desperate suckers.

  16. 16
    baal

    “supports the body’s natural detoxification process.”

    You know what else supports the body’s natural detoxification process? Drinking a glass of water.

    @ telomere support; One mechanism of aging is a reduction in the length of your teleomeres – the tips of your chromosomes. Once they get too short, you get chromosomal instability or an inability to undergo mitosis and a cell dies with out a replacement (unless your stemcells are really on the ball, but the number of those you have drops as you age as well). Turns out this is not entirely bad. Turning on telomerase (the enzyme that makes telomeres) increases your risk of cancer.

    In some recent anime, characters with psychic powers use their mental skills to re-build their telomeres (Shinsekai Yori for one example). I like to trust my health to folks who are knee deep in fantasy literature.

  17. 17
    grignon

    “…the body’s natural detoxification process.”
    Commonly called “shitting” and “pissing”.
    They sell laxatives and diuretics?
    From the description above it could be sauerkraut and beer.

  18. 18
    Modusoperandi

    “And one of their products claims to contain ‘telomere support.’”

    Have you seen the long-term consequences of unsupported telomeres? Go to the nude beach sometime. Try this Saturday. I’ll jog past. Maybe I’ll do some jumping jacks.
     
    fifthdentist “I was driving Saturday evening while the dreadful Prairie Home Companion was on NPR…”
    PHC is the funniest, most heartwarming five minutes on the radio, stretched out to two hours.

  19. 19
    fifthdentist

    @ Randomfactor,
    That too.
    The irony is people who believe that they can pray away the cancer (and being gay and the diebeetus) being bombarded with commercials about a business that charges money for curing cancer (allegedly).

  20. 20
    jnorris

    I thought Ron Paul’s 2012 Republican presidential primary run was to build a support base for his son, Rand’s own presidential campaign. If that was the intention, then this scheme will ruin it for Rand.

  21. 21
    Sastra

    This also falls under the definition of “crank magnetism:” people who believe in one type of weirdness are likely to believe in other apparently unrelated kinds of weird. This isn’t just about the crowd you hang out with providing alternative things to worry about ; it’s also the result of developing an anti-science mindset prone to conspiracy-thinking in general . So a vaccine-denier might also deny the holocaust — or someone will believe in alien abductions and chemtrails. You’ve lost the normal checks and balances and you’re looking around for secret knowledge. Watch out.

  22. 22
    Didaktylos

    Is anybody else wondering just how much of the right-wing media ecosystem is fundamentally about running scams of one kind or another?

    @Dunc, #2: You’re not seriously claiming that any significant part of it isn’t, are you?

  23. 23
    Donovan

    Thanks, Ed. Thanks for nothing, I mean. Why didn’t you post this last week? What the hell am I going to do with these microscopic, telomere sized crutches? Or these 10,000 Liberty and Freedom brand red, white, and blue urinals, guaranteed to aid in the body’s natural detoxification?

    Shit. Scam you say?

    Hey, everybody, ignore what’s posed above. Want to make some quick cash? Send me a check and I’ll send you primo money making, um, stuff.

  24. 24
  25. 25
    Tsu Dho Nimh

    “Ronnie Paul”, the wingnut scion, appears to be the one actually involved with this, with his dad’s photo on the header image to draw in the sheeples.

    Click on the “Our Team” link and you see Ronnie, stillsucking off daddy’s reputation

    Ronnie Paul, Texas businessman, son of presidential contender.

  26. 26
    thebookofdave

    And one of their products claims to contain “telomere support.”

    If their telomere support is still run by the same Mumbai-based call center, it’s certainly not worth bragging about in the ad. I can reboot my genome sequence without the help of a some amateur reading advice from a checklist in a foreign accent. Patching a few frayed telomeres is not worth the wait for tier 2 support.

  27. 27
    Thumper: Who Presents Boxes Which Are Not Opened

    “Telomere support”? I don’t even know what that means.

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