Bigots Try the ‘Your Father Would Be So Disappointed’ Approach


Sen. Bob Casey Jr., a centrist Democrat from Pennsylvania who followed in the footsteps of his father, is one of the recent Democratic legislators to have “evolved” on the issue of marriage equality. And the anti-gay bigots want him to know that his father would be very disappointed in him:

One of the other recent converts is Bob Casey, Jr., who just secured a second six-year term in Pennsylvania last November after backing away from President Obama’s endorsement of same-sex marriage.

Diane Gramley, president of the American Family Association of Pennsylvania, is not surprised that Casey “has now completed the ‘evolution’ of so many Democrats who have turned their backs on the majority of their constituents and have leaped over the cliff and into the unknown territory or redefining society’s foundation block.”

“When he first ran for Senate back in 2006, the Human Rights Campaign endorsed him and helped him in that campaign to defeat Senator Rick Santorum (R),” she recalls. “He’s always supported civil unions. To me, that’s just one step away from supporting same-sex marriage.”…

And the Pennsylvania pro-family leader points out that Casey’s father, who served two terms as governor of Pennsylvania, was different.

“His dad was strongly pro-life and strongly pro-family,” Gramley notes. “And if Bob Casey, Sr. was still alive, he would be extremely disappointed in his son. I do not believe Bob Casey, Sr. would have — quote, unquote — ‘evolved’ on this issue, as so many Democrats, especially, have done.”

And I’m sure that Lyndon Johnson’s father would have been very disappointed that his son supported civil rights for black people too. I just can’t imagine what that would have to do with anything.

Comments

  1. Larry says

    Isn’t it amazing the religious nut jobs know that mythical gods and dead people think exactly the same way they do?

  2. cry4turtles says

    Casey didn’t win because he backed down from Obama’s adgenda. He won because his opponent was a madman!

  3. says

    Just another example of how the Right’s worldview is based on authoritarianism. If your target won’t listen to any of your authority figures, invoke one that he WILL listen to! I mean, everybody must listen to their fathers, the ultimate personal authority, right?

  4. Akira MacKenzie says

    Oh no, there is no such thing as a patriarchy! There is no,firmly established cultural belief that older men are to be obeyed by their younger children without question or deviation simply because they are “their elders*.” That’s just man-hating Femi-nazi crazy talk!

    *I had a fundigelical cousin pull that crap on me when I disagreed with his father on a church-state separation issue. I was suppose to defer to his opinion because he was my elder.

  5. says

    They’re right, Ed Brayton. Everybody knows that our parents knew what was right. Further, it follows that their parents were righter, and everybody knows that things were better back when you were children, meaning that the current ideal (based on our grandparent’s childhoods) hovers around the 1920s or so. That’s why I hate spics, wops, cushis, hymies, limeys, nips, pakis, bohunks, chinks, red skins, slants, camel jockeys, slopes, chugs, spear chuckers, bogs, beaners, etc. Everyone but My People, really (and if any of my relatives turn out to be from one of those other groups, they’re either “the black sheep of the family” or “one of the good ones”).
    I’d hate fags, too, but my grandfather can’t remember where they’re from.

  6. dingojack says

    I’m not so sure about Sam Early Johnson Jr. being disappointed with his son, perhaps he would be, or perhaps not
    The FoAW notes; “During his time in the state legislature he fought against conservative Democrats who served business interests. While at the time, the lobbyists employed widespread bribery with the elected Texas officials. Congressman Sam Johnson refused bribes and favors from lobbyists.” Sounds like the kinda representative Texas could do with now, don’t you think?
    Dingo

  7. slc1 says

    Re dingojack @ #9

    I think that Brayton was referring to Sam Johnson’s attitude towards segregation, which was probably about par for the course in Texas at the time. Few politicians in Texas were against segregation at the time. It should also be pointed out that Johnson fils was one of only three Southern Democratic senators who declined to sign the massive resistance pledge (the others being Al Gore Sr. and Estes Kefauver of Tennessee).

  8. says

    *I had a fundigelical cousin pull that crap on me when I disagreed with his father on a church-state separation issue. I was suppose to defer to his opinion because he was my elder.

    Reminds me of a racist troll I once had. He kept whining about how I was pointing out his numerous logical fallacies and offering alternative parsimonious explanations instead of deferring to his magical insight because he claimed to be older and wiser than me.

  9. whheydt says

    Given my fathers statements at the time “block busting” was a real concern in some circles, I rather think he would support gay rights, were he alive today (he died in 1975). But then, he made pointed remarks about some of the racist rhetoric that was in the media in the 1960s and 1970s, having gotten some of the inside scoop on what slave-holding households were like from his grandfather, who grew up in antebellum New Orleans.

  10. says

    Pretty telling in the language, too, that AFA reps think ‘evolution’ is something that can actually be completed outside of a game of Starcraft.

  11. Nick Gotts (formerly KG) says

    I recall concealing from my father (a conservative, Brit style) that one of my best friends was gay, for fear of embarrassing him (he certainly wasn’t the man to be openly rude to a friend of mine). When he finally found out, he reminded me he’d spent six years in the Royal Navy.

  12. Sastra says

    Bronze Dog #11 wrote:

    Reminds me of a racist troll I once had. He kept whining about how I was pointing out his numerous logical fallacies and offering alternative parsimonious explanations instead of deferring to his magical insight because he claimed to be older and wiser than me.

    That’s one thing I love about the internet. I, too, once had someone playing the “I am older and wiser than you, my child” line on me — and playing it hard. I let him go on for quite a while … then casually mentioned my age, which was about 10 years over his. I said nothing else, and thus let him feel doubly embarrassed: first, that he had made such a mistake without checking and second, that I was too mature to dig it in — even though I could.

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