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Mar 29 2013

Massie: Godless Liberals Try to Destroy Easter

From the people who brought you the widely acclaimed War on Christmas, it’s the War on Easter. Apparently, we “godless liberals” are waging a war we didn’t even know we were in. And Mychal Massie, one of the Worldnutdaily’s columnists, throws lots of absurd rhetoric and ahistorical claims at it:

Secular humanist, anti-God, liberal progressives ultimately have no choice but to censor the truth and remove as much of God from public view as possible. Because if they do not, they risk the truth of what they strive to conceal to be revealed.

What is the truth they are so desperate to have hidden from public view? It’s that their philosophy is house of cards based on lies that will lead to the destruction of our society.

The truth they overlook is that their attempts to ban the word Christmas were not any more successful than Herod’s attempt to murder Christ by murdering male children two years and younger.

Yeah, except that alleged massacre by Herod likely did not happen. The only mention of it anywhere is in the gospel of Matthew, it isn’t even in the other three gospels or mentioned anywhere else in the Bible. And not a single historian made note of it even while providing great detail on the actions of Herod at the time. So while claiming we are trying to conceal the truth, he’s spreading falsehoods. How ironic.

21 comments

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  1. 1
    Brett McCoy

    Wait! I thought the evangelicals were waging their own war on Easter because it was too pagan, and they like to call it “Resurrection Sunday” or some such thing.

  2. 2
    raven

    The truth they overlook is that their attempts to ban the word Christmas were not any more successful than Herod’s attempt to murder Christ by murdering male children two years and younger.

    He is ignoring the fact that eventually someone did murder Christ. It took a few decades but he was killed at age 33.

    We pagans love Easter. It’s our holiday and the xians are just free riding on it.

    The word Easter isn’t in the bible. Neither are large bunnies bringing colored eggs or plastic grass in baskets. It is a holday named after the Germanic goddess of spring and fertility.

  3. 3
    Randomfactor

    The Christianists are going to have to fight the retail corporations to get Easter back. Good luck with THAT.

  4. 4
    Kevin

    Well, this godless liberal isn’t trying to murder Easter. He’s trying to ignore it. But it’s darn near impossible.

    In my local newspaper (yes, I still do dead trees), the Friday Arts/Food/Entertainment insert is chock-a-block full of ADS for Easter services. Seriously? Ads? Like Christians don’t know about this? Or that non-Christians would decide “hey, this is a good time to check out that whole Christianity thing”?

    But there is a type of candy that you only get at Easter which I quite enjoy — so I guess I’m OK with that.

  5. 5
    Jackie

    As long as Reese’s makes those peanut butter eggs, this godless liberal is going to look forward to Easter.

  6. 6
    shouldbeworking

    This godless liberal has redefined Easter to mean “when Cadbury Creme Eggs are found in stores”.

  7. 7
    baal

    My wife and I have been known to celebrate easter by having sex in a field. In other news, my son loves Easter for the basket of candy but evenmoreso the family plastic egg hunt. He’s decided, however, that the egg hiders (me) need new rules on where to hide eggs. They were totally unfairly placed in places he didn’t look in. I’m pretty sure this godless liberal has done all he can to destroy easter (would that I was trying to, been too busy with getting on with life).

  8. 8
    Mobius

    But…but…but…

    Wasn’t it the WND that was pointing out that Easter was derived from a pagan holiday?

    Irony meter go BOOM.

  9. 9
    Gretchen

    What is the truth they are so desperate to have hidden from public view? It’s that their philosophy is house of cards based on lies that will lead to the destruction of our society.

    Are they Easter cards?

    Is the philosophy that once you kill someone, he stays dead? Because if so, I could see how that would seem destructive to certain mindsets, most notably the pro-war variety.

  10. 10
    mvemjsun

    I am against the Easter service at Mt Rushmore here in SD. The separation of church and state thing.

  11. 11
    Pierce R. Butler

    But at least the king in question was in favor of Herodosexual marriage. …

    Dammit, where’s my coat?!?

  12. 12
    magistramarla

    Well, this pair of godless liberals will go to the movies on Sunday morning, taking advantage of the fact that the theater won’t be crowded. Then, we’ll go have a leisurely meal at our favorite local Chinese restaurant, again taking advantage of the lack of crowds. We’re glad that all of the silly people will be busy this weekend.

  13. 13
    Artor

    “The truth they overlook is that their attempts to ban the word Christmas were not any more successful than Herod’s attempt to murder Christ by murdering male children two years and younger.”

    Well, as Ed pointed out, Herod’s Massacre of the Innocents probably didn’t happen at all. Likewise, in reality-world, there is no attempt to ban the word Xmas. Only in the minds of the delusional paranoids.

  14. 14
    Nemo

    Forget Easter — today is Good Friday. When we celebrate Jesus being dead!

  15. 15
    Nemo

    I actually had a Jehovah’s Witness* come to my door the other day, inviting me to join them in a “celebration, commemorating Jesus’ death”. I swear that’s what she said.

    * I only found out after she left that she was JW, by reading the flyer she left. And the day they were commemorating was apparently March 26th, which they claimed to be the true anniversary of Good Friday. Whatever.

  16. 16
    jonathangray

    raven:

    We pagans love Easter.

    You’re a pagan? What kind?

    It’s our holiday and the xians are just free riding on it.

    Crap. The Christian Easter has its roots in the Jewish Pesach.

    The word Easter isn’t in the bible. Neither are large bunnies bringing colored eggs or plastic grass in baskets. It is a holday named after the Germanic goddess of spring and fertility.

    The Old English word “Easter” may well have its origins in pagan religion, but the Christian festival doesn’t. In Romance and Celtic countries they call it by names derived from the Hebrew Pesach (Pasqua, Pascua, Paschen, Pasg etc). Next you’ll be saying that Good Friday is pagan because “Friday” is named after the goddess Freya.

  17. 17
    Michael Heath

    Mychal Massie:

    Secular humanist, anti-God, liberal progressives ultimately have no choice but to censor the truth and remove as much of God from public view as possible. Because if they do not, they risk the truth of what they strive to conceal to be revealed.

    “Remove as much of God from public view as possible”? I have yet to encounter any evidence anyone’s observed God in the public square, or elsewhere. How can we remove that which has never been observed?

  18. 18
    Dr X

    Ban the word Christmas? What the hell is talking about? Anyway, I’ve got to go microwave some peeps.

  19. 19
    matty1

    @17 You mean you didn’t realise? That guy who was arrested for indecent exposure in the public square last year was God.

  20. 20
    hunter

    jonathangray @16 — you’re right, in major part: the Christian Easter is its own holiday. However, the Jewish festival of Pesach is the context, not the origin of the holiday.

    However, as was the habit of the early Church, the modern celebration of Eastern has appropriated a lot of the symbolism of the old Pagan Ostara (also known as Eostre), a celebration of the Spring Equinox — eggs, rabbits — all fertility symbols. (See also Christmas trees, wreaths, caroling, Lammas, St. Brigid, for other appropriations.)

    And in a slightly larger context, however, the observance of the Crucifixion is an almost exact parallel to the old Pagan holiday of Samhain, when the god sacrifices himself (or allows himself to be sacrificed) and enters the Underworld until he is reborn at Yule. The time spent before his rebirth/resurrection has been compressed, and it’s been shifted in time to coincide with Passover (or did originally), while the original holiday was in the autumn to mark the waning of the year. So, in a way, Raven is correct as well.

  21. 21
    jonathangray

    hunter:

    However, the Jewish festival of Pesach is the context, not the origin of the holiday.

    Not sure what you mean by that.

    However, as was the habit of the early Church, the modern celebration of Eastern has appropriated a lot of the symbolism of the old Pagan Ostara (also known as Eostre), a celebration of the Spring Equinox — eggs, rabbits — all fertility symbols.

    It’s perfectly possible that pagan symbolism was assimilated into some countries’ Easter celebrations. However, my understanding is that next to nothing is known about what actual pagan celebrations may have been associated with Eostre/Ostara.

    And in a slightly larger context, however, the observance of the Crucifixion is an almost exact parallel to the old Pagan holiday of Samhain, when the god sacrifices himself (or allows himself to be sacrificed) and enters the Underworld until he is reborn at Yule. The time spent before his rebirth/resurrection has been compressed, and it’s been shifted in time to coincide with Passover (or did originally), while the original holiday was in the autumn to mark the waning of the year.

    How do you account for this “almost exact parallel” and what significance do you attribute to it? Are you suggesting that the early Christians consciously worked ancient European pagan motifs into the accounts of Christ’s Crucifixion and Resurrection? Or that it’s some kind of archetypal pattern embedded in the collective human psyche?

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