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Mar 06 2013

Dean Chambers Promotes Lies

You remember Dean Chambers, the right wing dolt who made a fool out of himself by spending months claiming the polls were skewed and that Romney was going to win in a landslide, don’t you? At some point I started following him on Facebook and he has never missed a chance to make a fool of himself. He posted this tidbit on Facebook on Saturday:

DeanChambers1

And here’s the picture that goes with it:

DeanChambers2

I’m sure you’ll be shocked to hear that this is just more wingnut paranoia and has been thoroughly debunked. And within a few minutes of posting that, he passed on another pack of lies:

DeanChambers3

Absolutely false. Members of Congress do not continue to receive their salary for the rest of their lives. In fact, once they leave office, they play by the same rule most do, they can get a pension when they turn 62. Their pensions are pretty generous, but they don’t get anything even close to their salaries for life. Nor do presidents, by the way. They get a pension that is just under half the annual pay for the office and it is fully taxable. Again, that’s quite generous, but it isn’t anywhere near getting their regular salaries for life.

Chambers wouldn’t know reality if it crawled up his pantleg, perched on his ass and yodeled the Macarena.

And then just to top it off, here’s another bit of stupid from his Facebook page:

DeanChambers4

21 comments

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  1. 1
    arakasi

    If he’s trying to argue that we should increase SS payouts, I’m willing to support that. I get the idea, though, that he would claim that I’m missing the point.

  2. 2
    Gretchen

    So Chambers is a credulous, sexist/homophobic, glurge-spreading conspiracy theorist.

    He fits right in with a lot of what I’ve seen on Facebook lately.

  3. 3
    gopiballava

    I know a few people with RFID implants like that. GPS? Hah. Nothing but a 64 bit serial number. You can’t read them at much more than 2 to 4 inches.

  4. 4
    Bronze Dog

    Reading the Bible is one of the things that convinced me to never go back to church.

  5. 5
    Gregory in Seattle

    The chip implant idea has been around since the early 90s: I first heard of it as part of failed prophet Hal Linday’s predictions about the Mark of the Beast. His earlier “prophesies” in the 80s said that the Mark would be a barcode tattoo.

  6. 6
    matty1

    GPS navigation system are so you can tell where you are using the satellite signals they don’t transmit anything.

    You can though have transmitters capable of being tracked by satellite, they are used to track delivery vans for instance and I’ve heard of them being used to research the movements of whales. Anyone know what the minimum size is for such a device? I have a suspicion it is larger than an RFID chip.

  7. 7
    Randomfactor

    You can’t read them at much more than 2 to 4 inches.

    Ha! That’s what they WANT you to think.

    But the real danger of the rfid chip implant isn’t that it’s an identifier. It apparently constantly emits focused laser beams of radiation, enough to show up as a DARK mark on an x-ray.

  8. 8
    MikeMa

    Credulous fools like this have always existed. Scam artists have taken them for millenia.

    The problem is that the internet and social media makes them instant idiots. Widespread idiots. Flag waving fools. The delay inherent in our pre-internet age allowed most idiots to be corrected before they let the crazy slip out to the world. Friends, editors, and more skeptical folks in their environment softened the hammering someone like Chambers would get. Now he is a known fool, liar and idiot and the internet will not forget.

    Facebook need a function to allow me to automatically un-friend (with a scathing message of course) anyone who likes a Chambers post.

  9. 9
    raven

    Credulous fools like this have always existed. Scam artists have taken them for millenia.

    Dean Chambers isn’t the credulous fool. He’s the scam artist.

    He needs better material if he is going to make much money at this.

  10. 10
    John Pieret

    Gregory in Seattle @ 5:

    [Hal Linday’s] earlier “prophesies” in the 80s said that the Mark would be a barcode tattoo.

    Hah! So that’s why George Bush the Elder pretended not to know about supermarket scanners! He didn’t want to let the cat out of the bag! Proof positive, for anyone as perceptive as Chambers, that our government is intent on giving us all the Mark of the Beast

  11. 11
    DaveL

    “New Devilry?”

    Has anyone come up with a Boromir GIF for this yet?

  12. 12
    DaveL

    What is this new devilry?

  13. 13
    d.c.wilson

    “[Hal Linday’s] earlier “prophesies” in the 80s said that the Mark would be a barcode tattoo.”

    He stole that from the first Terminator movie.

  14. 14
    thepalescot

    @ Gregory in Seattle # 5

    The 90′s? Back in the 70′s when I started riding the the NYC subway there’d be these pamphlets lying around warning all about the government stamping bar codes on everyone; “the mark of the beast”. They must be going nuts about the cards everyone has to use to get on the subway now and days.

  15. 15
    blf

    I’m rather curious where the antenna capable of communicating with a satellite goes.

    And what is the power source for the transmitter?
    (I imagine that in the case of wingnuts there’s plenty of hot air. Perhaps enough so they float up to where the satellites are, which would have several advantages. Like asphyxiation.)

  16. 16
    slc1

    Re matty1 @ #6

    But the transponders on private automobiles to enable the driver to bypass toll collection booths do transmit information indicating that a particular vehicle at a particular time entered the toll roadway. If road pricing were ever to be implemented, the government could track and identify every vehicle using the information obtained from the transponders. In fact, the latest toll facilities now require transponders (c.f. the toll lanes on the Washington Beltway between I395 and the Dulles Toll Road).

  17. 17
    Matrim

    Stuff like this really pisses me off…not because it’s paranoid bullshit with no basis in reality, but because when we finally do have some sort of awesome implant that can do awesome stuff, there will be all the more pushback against it because of these conspiracy ramblings. I want my cybernetics and fully integrated AR, damn it!

  18. 18
    ArtK

    RFID comes in two flavors, active and passive. Passive tags are ones like the chips implanted in pets, and in some package labels. They require an external RF signal to so that they can be read. For most tags, the maximum distance from the transmitter/receiver is a few feet. I know a company that can do it up to a few hundred feet. In order to do 3D location, you need multiple receiver antennas across the area you want to track. Almost nobody can do 3D location using passive tags. Passive tags are cheap, on the order of a few cents each.

    Active tags, like those used for tracking whales, cars and large shipping containers require an internal power source. Active tags are expensive and still somewhat bulky. To do 3D location you either need multiple antennas (like in a warehouse) or an active tag with an associated GPS — which drives the price up even more. An embedded GPS is between $40-80 retail.

  19. 19
    meursalt

    I’m rather curious where the antenna capable of communicating with a satellite goes.

    And what is the power source for the transmitter?

    It goes in all the doorways in public places, and in both private and mass-transit vehicles. This would be a separate device that tracks the implants. Power comes from standard A/C in buildings. In vehicles, it’s powered just like the GPS systems cars currently use. All we need to do is add an RFID scanner. It’s been mentioned above that GPS doesn’t track its clients, so of course there’d need to be a separate communication band for that; maybe another satellite network. I’m sure we have something up there now that would serve the purpose.

    Let’s be clear here – Mr. Chambers is worthy of laughter due to the demonstrably false claim about the Affordable Healthcare Act and the silly X-ray (Is this a right hand, palm up? I’m no good at reading these things, so maybe someone else can comment. This is significant as a fundie dogwhistle). It’s clear the bill draft was referring to things like pacemakers and implantable defibrillators, and talking about a system for tracking their effectiveness. The claims in this meme are demonstrably false in regard to the law. On the technical side of things, I see nothing to laugh at here. Such a system would certainly be feasible. There would be some growing pains scaling up to the huge number of clients needed to implant the U.S populace, but I’m sure the NSA has good insights into handling this sort of thing on a massively parallel basis, ever since it became kosher to turn the ear of Echelon on our own citizenry (and we know damn well they were doing it before it was legal).

    [waiting to be dismissed as a kook... :)]

  20. 20
    Scott Hanley

    Chambers wouldn’t know reality if it crawled up his pantleg, perched on his ass and yodeled the Macarena.

    To be fair, I wouldn’t recognize that as reality, either.

  21. 21
    josephmccauley

    Last fall I was feeling bad for my former student and asked that you cut him some slack. Slack time over, he’s all yours.

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