Obama Derangement Syndrome Strikes Again


I don’t remember where the term “derangement syndrome” began. Someone who suffers from it is totally incapable of thinking reasonably about the object of their hatred so everything gets interpreted in the most absurd and evil way even if it’s obvious to everyone else that they’re distorting the truth. Here’s a perfect example, Victor Medina clearly suffering from Obama Derangement Syndrome:

According to a report by the Weekly Standard, during a Google Hangout live video chat last Thursday (February 14), President Barack Obama complained that his problems include abiding by the laws of the United States, griping “I’m not the Emperor of the United States.”

After being asked why he had not done more about illegal immigration, or stopped a record number of deportations, President Obama said “This is something I’ve struggled with throughout my presidency. The problem is that I’m the president of the United States, I’m not the Emperor of the United States. My job is to execute laws that are passed,” he said.

Any reasonable person could see that he wasn’t complaining, he was explaining to the person asking the question that the president doesn’t have imperial authority and still must enforce laws they don’t agree with. But when it comes to Obama, Medina simply can’t be reasonable.

The President then blamed the immigration problem on Congress, saying they had failed to address what he called “a broken immigration system.” However, the President has opposed any immigration reform efforts offered by Republicans, including the STEM Act, which had received wide bipartisan support. The Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Act would make visas more available to immigrants that earn advanced technical degrees in U.S. universities.

Obama is right that Congress hasn’t passed immigration reform. He’s also right that the STEM act, while I think it’s a good idea, has almost nothing to do with real immigration reform. It does nothing to address the problem of 11 million undocumented immigrants in the country at all.

Comments

  1. says

    I recall the term popping up as Bush Derangement Syndrome back in the midst of the C-Plus Augustus administration, after years of the Patriot Act, warrantless wiretapping, free speech zones, the Iraq debacle, and Darth Cheney in his undisclosed location made it very easy to assume the absolute worst about what he may do, and some people ran with it – camps, cancelling elections, jackbooted thugs snatching antiwar campaigners and anyone suspected of being Muslim in the night (although that second last wasn’t too far off with widespread infiltration of opposition groups, and the last really did happen in the days after 9/11, so make of that what you will). Bush’s crack during his first presidential campaign about how the US would be easier to run as a dictatorship “as long as I were the dictator” probably didn’t help things, given suspicions about his gullibility and the power his advisors and backers may have held over him (my guesses: highly gullible, and far more than we’ll ever know).

    Noting that you’re not an absolute ruler is one thing; joking about being one is a bit different, and kind of creepy, although in some ways it’s refreshing to hear of people seeking clownish amounts of power being so open about what they think of the structures and societies they wish to rule.

    Anyway, the Nobel Peace Prize winner in power is OK with warrantless wiretapping and extrajudicial killings, and as usual his loudest rivals don’t make a peep about those things because they’d like those powers available for themselves, so here we are. That Pandora’s Box won’t be closing without a lot of pressure and force from all of us on the potential wrong end of those powers. Remember, missiles and deep packet inspection programs don’t know anything about the targets they’re trained upon, and don’t care – do you trust the people ordering their use?

  2. Alverant says

    I remember the term being used by W’s defenders to dismiss any complaints against him no matter how legitimate. You had a more encompassing term for when an argument is dismissed just because the person was part of a group and not because of the content of the argument. I forgot what it was.

    I also remember W making the comment that he wished the US was a dictatorship (provided he was the dictator). Did Medina say anything about that?

  3. Jordan Genso says

    You had a more encompassing term for when an argument is dismissed just because the person was part of a group and not because of the content of the argument. I forgot what it was.

    Are you thinking of Ed’s ‘Argumentum ad labelum’?

  4. freemage says

    Yeah, “Bush Derangement Syndrome” is how I really recall it coming into common usage. (After that, I’ve seen it applied in other contexts, including fandom–“Character Derangement Syndrome” being when you so utterly despise a particular character that you automatically re-interpret any actions or dialogue in the worst possible light, for instance, often stretching the bounds of plausible discourse.) And as noted, BDS really was a thing–a lot of it fed the Truther movement (at least, the leftist component thereof). The notion that 9/11 happened because Bush was evil (rather than our government in general being merely incompetent in assessing our actions in the Middle East) was rather endemic at the time. Then, however, a bunch of Republican blowhards started immediately whipping out the BDS charge anytime someone said anything negative about Dubya, no matter how reasoned or mild.

  5. Scr... Archivist says

    If the archives of Google Groups and the article in Wikipedia are any guide, the term “derangement syndrome” as applied to politics was coined in December 2003 by Charles Krauthammer. He defined it specifically regarding Dubya, writing, “Bush Derangement Syndrome: ‘the acute onset of paranoia in otherwise normal people in reaction to the policies, the presidency — nay — the very existence of George W. Bush’.” The first person he diagnosed was Howard Dean, well-known 9-11 truther and — worse — self-confessed Democrat. (Boo, hiss.)

    I’m not sure the term applies to the most vituperative opponents of Obama. Nearly all of them were already paranoid to begin with.

  6. Acolyte of Sagan says

    Did you know that the 2ft. tall mythical creature that inhabits the Oval Office also has ‘ODS’? He was seen recently walking out of the White House singing the old Eric Carmen song;
    “Obama’s Elf, don’t wanna be
    Obama’s Elf, anymore”.

  7. Michael Heath says

    Ed writes:

    I don’t remember where the term “derangement syndrome” began. Someone who suffers from it is totally incapable of thinking reasonably about the object of their hatred so everything gets interpreted in the most absurd and evil way even if it’s obvious to everyone else that they’re distorting the truth.

    I get email blasts through-out the day from the Wall Street Journal. A couple of days a week I’ll click on the link to the article to just to see how so many of the commenters in that venue will imagine a way to blame President Obama for what’s being reported; that’s of course when the article has nothing to do with anything the President can significantly influence.

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