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WND: Scientists Using Satanic Telescope!

See, this is why I still enjoy reading the Worldnutdaily. It just cracks me up what they think is news and how they slant everything toward their intellectually challenged audience. Like how they’ve blown the lid off the fact that there’s a powerful new telescope in Arizona called — cue the scary music — LUCIFER.

The Large Binocular Telescope, or LBT, perched atop the Mount Graham International Observatory in southeastern Arizona, contains an immensely powerful tool that allows humans to observe the faintest and most distant objects in the heavens.

Those objects can be detected with the help of LUCIFER – a beastly set of super-cooled, near-infrared cameras also known as Large Binocular Telescope Near-infrared Utility with Camera and Integral Field Unit for Extragalactic Research.

The first camera, LUCIFER I, was fitted to the telescope in 2010. According to some reports, LUCIFER II is set to be installed as early as this year.

But why did scientists choose the widely known moniker for Satan when naming the instruments?

And what is the Vatican’s widely rumored involvement with LUCIFER?

Oh yes, we must know the answer to these questions.

WND contacted German astronomers at the Center for Astronomy of Heidelberg University who gave LUCIFER its diabolical name.

Professor and astronomer Andreas Quirrenbach, who also identified himself as a Catholic, told WND there’s a common misconception about the term “Lucifer.”

“The origin of the name is Latin, meaning ‘bearer of light,’” Quirrenbach said. “Whereas today most people may associate the name with a mythical fallen angel, who is also frequently identified with the devil, this is by no means the only and also not the original use of the name.

“In fact the designation ‘Lucifer’ was used in antiquity to designate the ‘morning star,’ i.e., the planet Venus when it is visible in the morning sky. This is the first use of the name, and so its occurrence in astronomy precedes any religious connotations.”

Quirrenbach also told WND, “[T]he only biblical connotation of ‘Lucifer’ is the astronomical reference to the morning star, which in turn is used to symbolize the Babylonian rulers (probably because the Babylonians identified constellations with gods). The downfall of the morning star is then a powerful picture for the end of Babylonian rule over Israel, as prophesied by Isaiah. Several authors have linked the name ‘Lucifer’ in the Bible to the devil, but this is due mostly to a misreading of the relevant biblical verses. However, these misreadings have propagated into folklore.”

But you know how those scientists lie all the time, right?

Mark Biltz is founder of El Shaddai Ministries, a Hebrew roots resource and teaching ministry. He told WND that Quirrenbach’s argument is based on “false assumptions.”

“To begin, there are astronomical references in the Bible from 4,000 years ago,” Biltz explained. “Also, when you go from Hebrew to Latin to English, you do lose much in translation.”

Biltz confirmed that the literal translation of “heylel” is “morning star,” not Lucifer or even Venus, as Quirrenbach suggested. (Biltz noted that the Hebrew word for Venus is, in fact, Nogah.)

“Yet this [Isaiah 14:12] commentary does refer to Satan,” he explained. “In Hebrew, every letter is a picture, a word, a number, etc. You can have multiple valid meanings. So yes it can refer to the king of Babylon, and yes it can refer to Satan, and yes it can refer to a morning star.

And it goes on and on and on like that. This is a news story for them.

Comments

  1. Moggie says

    The Large Binocular Telescope, or LBT, perched atop the Mount Graham International Observatory in southeastern Arizona

    If only they’d named it the Large Graham Binocular Telescope, or LGBT.

  2. matty1 says

    when you go from Hebrew to Latin to English

    To the best of my knowledge most Bible translations do in fact translate direct from the Hebrew not via Latin. There may be older (and we’re talking centuries) versions that go that way due to a lack of Hebrew texts but today it would seems completely unncessary.

  3. garnetstar says

    How about they named it Lucifer because it’s a damn acronym? Large Utility with Camera and Integral Field unit for Extragalactic Research.

    Please, someone, explain Occam’s Razor to these wingnuts. Slowly, in one-syllable words.

  4. says

    “In Hebrew, every letter is a picture, a word, a number, etc. You can have multiple valid meanings. So yes it can refer to the king of Babylon, and yes it can refer to Satan, and yes it can refer to a morning star.”

    And yet it doesn’t occur to him that polysemy is not a unique feature of Hebrew but occurs also in other languages, meaning that a word can both refer to Satan and to the morning star and that one might not be in fact intended.

  5. Henry Neufeld says

    “Yet this [Isaiah 14:12] commentary does refer to Satan,” he explained. “In Hebrew, every letter is a picture, a word, a number, etc. You can have multiple valid meanings. So yes it can refer to the king of Babylon, and yes it can refer to Satan, and yes it can refer to a morning star.

    As someone who actually does read Hebrew, I find this an amazing statement. And yes, people will believe it, unfortunately. There’s simply so much wrong with that paragraph.

    1) Isaiah 14:12 does not refer to Satan. Demonstrating this would take some time. I’ll wait until someone produces a piece of evidence to suggest it does.
    2) Every letter is a picture? Yes, but that’s pretty much true of alphabets … or rather of their origin. But the meaning of a word is no more created by the pictures from which the letters developed in Hebrew than in any other language.
    3) Words have multiple valid meanings, but that’s true of language in general. This is generally an excuse used by people who discover that the Hebrew scriptures don’t actually say what they want them to say.
    4) The reference here is to the morning star (“shining one,” which is here Venus), and in this connection does have a symbolic meaning, the king of Babylon, which is very clear from the context.

  6. raven says

    To the best of my knowledge most Bible translations do in fact translate direct from the Hebrew.

    The entire New Testament was written in Koine Greek. Daniel was written in Aramaic.

  7. Karen Locke says

    Centuries ago, or so it seems, in the late 1980s, I was an engineer working for a military contractor on flight simulators. When we developed the prototype for a particular program, we figured out acronyms to call our sub-modules things like CURSE, FEAR, and RAGE. It was all a bit of engineering fun, and a way of purging some of our frustrations with the program management. All went well until upper management heard us using our (by then oh-so-familiar) acronyms in front of the customer’s engineers! The customers didn’t seem to mind, but upper management had a collective fit.

    The whole notion of LUCIFER suggests a similar mindset among the scientists who coined it.

  8. jnorris says

    The dreaded Lettuce Bacon Tomato (LBT) telescope is nothing compared to the Evil LUCIFER .
    Got to hand it to the WND, they did actual journalism and contacted the people involved. They’re still crazy though.

  9. cptdoom says

    How about they named it Lucifer because it’s a damn acronym? Large Utility with Camera and Integral Field unit for Extragalactic Research.

    That was the scientists’ mistake. They should have left the full name of the device as is, but referred to it as “Louis Cypher,” and they would never have been found out. What, you think the editors at WND are smarter than Mickey Rourke?

  10. Larry says

    Pleased to meet you
    Hope you guessed my name, oh yeah
    But what’s confusing you
    Is just the nature of my game
    Just as every cop is a criminal
    And all the sinners saints
    As heads is tails
    Just call me lucifer
    Cause I’m in need of some restraint

    Quite simply, the person who named it was a Stones fan. Hoo-hoo!

  11. eric says

    Biltz confirmed that the literal translation of “heylel” is “morning star,” not Lucifer or even Venus, as Quirrenbach suggested. (Biltz noted that the Hebrew word for Venus is, in fact, Nogah.)

    Venus appears in both the morning and evening. Some cultures thought the morning and evening appearances were different objects, so Venus has two names in a variety of ancient writings. Wikipedia tells me the Babylonians got it right but the Greeks and Romans both gave it two names, with the Romans using “Lucifer” for the evening star and “Vesper” for the morning star….

    Which is fully consistent with both Quirrenbach’s comment and Blitz’s. Blitz may be linguistically correct but historically ignorant.

  12. leftwingfox says

    Garnetstar: Honestly, I seriously doubt the acronym came out first. I think it’s much more likely that a scientist liked the “Bringer of Light/Morning Star/Hehehe” implications of the name, and fudged the acronym to fit.

    ——-

    “I think we’re all beginning to lose sight of the real issue here, which is: what are we going to call ourselves? I think it comes down to a choice between “The League Against Salivating Monsters” or, my own personal preference, which is “The Committee for the Liberation and Integration of Terrifying Organisms and their Rehabilitation Into Society.” One drawback with that–the abbreviation is C.L.I.T.O.R.I.S.” – Rimmer, Red Dwarf

  13. naturalcynic says

    The most obvious interpretation of WND has to be the rejection of Lucifer. After all, they do want to be kept in the dark. Growing on bullshit. They’re MUSHROOMZ!!!!11!!

  14. says

    @garnetstar #2 – “Please, someone, explain Occam’s Razor to these wingnuts. Slowly, in one-syllable words.”

    No can do: both “Occam” and “razor” have two syllables each.

  15. robertfaber says

    There are no astronomical references from the Bible 4000 years ago, because the book didn’t exist at the time. Isaiah was written in the 500s BCE at the earliest, which leaves it about 1500 years short of Blitz’s WND “expert” analysis.

  16. Abby Normal says

    Those serpents/scientists continue to spread their subtle evil. God is not some little fleck of an atom. People are not homo anything, those queers notwithstanding. And Uranus should not be probed. Need more convincing? Ever notice the USB emblem is Satan’s trident. Think about it.

  17. Randomfactor says

    There may be older (and we’re talking centuries) versions that go that way

    King James Version, no?

  18. says

    Ed! You left out the best line in the article! It’s the very last line:

    The Vatican observatory did not return WND’s requests for comment about whether Jesuits had located alien life in deep space.

    Gee, I wonder why…

  19. Nibi says

    Too bad LHC wasn’t instead dubbed the Large Underground Collision Instrument and Field Energy Resolver. Then we could have LUCIFER in search of the God particle.

  20. Crudely Wrott says

    Word association time.

    When I hear the word “lucifer’ I immediately imagine a word that describes “making something lucid, that is more apprehensible, clearer, brighter.

    In my world, this leads to greater understanding. In We’re Not Dumb world, it leads to fear and trembling and spittle spewing rhetoric.

    Nice to be here with all of you in my world.

  21. Crudely Wrott says

    punctuation patrol.
    There should be a comma after “that is” in second sentence.
    There should be one of these ! after “Not” in fourth sentence.
    Maybe some of you just knew to put them there on your own . . .

  22. matty1 says

    @7 Yes, I should have been clearer I meant that modern translators use sources in the original languages, whatever they may be rather than translating through a third language.

    @20
    According to Wikipedia (which of course could be wrong) the King James Bible did use a Hebrew source for the Old Testament but they did switch to Greek or Latin versions of the Hebrew didn’t match their theology.

  23. ospalh says

    (A)ll academia now accepts (…) that (there may be) intelligent life literally trillions of years ahead of us (…)

    Citation needed!
    Billions, trillions, it’s all before 4004BC, so i guess for the WND a few orders of magnitude don’t matter.

  24. Tabun says

    Engineers and scientists can be so creative when it comes to acronyms.

    I recall reading about a variant of secondary ion mass spectrometry a few years back, called the SHRIMP (Sensitive High-Resolution Ion MicroProbe).

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