Liberty Counsel Does Rap Videos

I’m not sure what to make of this. Liberty Counsel, Jerry Falwell’s answer to the ACLU, is now apparently producing videos for Christian rappers. They’ve put out a casting call for people to star in a video for someone who calls himself Humble Tip.

18 comments on this post.
  1. Reginald Selkirk:

    Isn’t this one of the signs of the impending apocalypse? 2013 might be the year.

  2. Brett McCoy:

    Aren’t they a few years late in jumping on the hip hop/rap bandwagon? If they really want to appear “with it”, they need to be doing acid jazz and dubstep.

  3. Akira MacKenzie:

    Since actual creativity is absent from the fundamentalist mindset , all they can do mimic the secular culture they despise as a means to evangelize. Since they can’t truly understand the art they are trying to copy, it all ends up the same way: kitschy and terrible.

  4. timgueguen:

    A guy named Stephen Wiley supposedly released the first Christian rap album in 1986, Bible Break.

  5. Stu:

    Oh man, it’s bad. Here’s some of his earlier work:

  6. John Hinkle:

    @Akira MacKenzie

    Agreed. It’s the same with their attempts to co-opt science for whatever end they want to claim as true, until science indisputably disagrees with them, then it’s “well, science can’t answer everything” or “it’s in the Bible, I believe it, that settles it.” Science is good until it’s not good.

    Janet Parshall on Moody Bible Radio has a program called In The Market, in which she claims to have “robust conversations” in the “marketplace of ideas”, but it’s really just mimicry of something you’d hear on NPR. Her topics are presented with a narrow “biblical perspective” (now that’s robust), which is kind of funny because they really have to do some mental juggling to, for example, show how the Bible has an economic theory that the government shouldn’t help poor people.

  7. Modusoperandi:

    Did anyone tell Humble Tip that Falwell got his start with things like this? Yes, it’s possible that Jerry changed his way, and yes, it’s probable that it was at least partly political in the first place, but on the other hand whether it was from the heart or it was cynical, when Falwell moved on he only moved on to hating other groups.

  8. Rip Steakface:

    @Brett McCoy

    If they really wanted to be with it, they’d be ripping off complextro.

  9. loreo:

    “Humble Tip”, oh man, that’s funny. Christian “humility” = “I read one book, now I’m qualified to tell you how to run your entire life”.

    About as humble as Kanye, except Yeezy doesn’t pretend that he’s anybody’s savior.

  10. Crudely Wrott:

    @Akira MacKenzie
    Yup. That is a standard MO for those who stand on grounds made of mists and longings.
    In a way, a perfectly human way, I pity them.
    At the same time, I don’t like them very much at all. That is, I really, really don’t like them. In the same way that I don’t like bee stings. They don’t hurt me but, damn, they are an unwelcome interruption.
    And besides, “rap” is not music. It is noise.

  11. Modusoperandi:

    Crudely Wrott, now tell us young’uns to hike up our pants. Shake your broom! Shake it!

  12. Rip Steakface:

    And besides, “rap” is not music. It is noise.

    Let’s just ignore the thirty years of history in the genre, and its influences ranging from funk to jazz to heavy metal. Yep, that’ll show our musical knowledge. If you’re arguing that the sort of hip-pop that’s distributed on Top 40 radio stations is noise, sure, fine. But don’t dismiss the fun genres like g-funk (which takes all of the music – the beats, the melodies, the song structure – straight from 70s funk, especially George Clinton, meaning the only real difference is the vocal delivery) or intelligent progressive rap (which definitely exists – refer to any less-popular Lupe Fiasco song or album – he wrote a goddamn feminist rap song).

  13. Crudely Wrott:

    OK. So rap isn’t really just noise. But it would be better if they hired real drummers. Just imagine what someone like Gene Krupa could do for rap and hip-hop. Some real character and depth, perhaps? A beat that is not staggeringly boring and mind numbing?

    Sorry if I step on toes here. You have my apology.

    Yes, I am the reflection of my parents when I first put a Jimi Hendrix album on the family hi-fi. Just imagine me blushing.

  14. Modusoperandi:

    Crudely Wrott “But it would be better if they hired real drummers.”
    You know that ex-Public Enemy goof with the multiple, crappy, reality shows? Here he is on drums. And that’s not all. He’s a virtuoso.
    So get off our step, pops!

  15. dingojack:

    Q: How many drummers does it take to change a light bulb?
    A: None – they have machines that do that nowadays.

    Dingo
    ——–
    Q How many ants does it take to screw it a light bulb?

  16. =8)-DX:

    Humble Tip? Just the tip?

  17. scienceavenger:

    RIP Steakface, you are being way too general in your music lumping. As one who proudly owns some George Clinton, as well as Bootsy Collins, and other funk artists, I still won’t touch most (c)rap with a ten foot poll, though I’ll admit Eminem, Nelly, and some others occasionally rise above the genre. But Pitbull and the rest? Chanting babyish rhymes with a monotonous backbeat does not great music make, and just because its persistent doesn’t make it worthy (nod to Tim Minchion). Maybe its just because I have a talent for fast talking myself (I can do Eminem’s “Without Me” and REM’s “End of the world” sans lyric sheet), but I find it all underwhelming and stupid. I’ll check Lupe Fiasco, maybe there’s hope there – “intelligent progressive rap” seems oxymoronic to me. Adding Christianity to it seems entirely appropo.

    And yeah, pull up your pants, dumbest fucking fashion trend since white leisure suits, but less functional. And no, I’m not eligible for AARP membership.

  18. kermit.:

    RIp – Digable Planets had at least one feminist song on their first release in 1993.

    Crudely Wrot, try some of the internet African stations – much contemporary music from across the pond and turn right incorporates American rap and hip-hop, but it sounds to me like they make their own music all the way. I can’t imagine any pan-African music group not doing their own rhythms.
    .
    Jamaican dance hall has some pretty good stuff, too

    Oh – and Brazilian! Check out “Paul in Rio”, a fine internet station, for a wide variety of pop music which puts Yankee pop to shame. Ranges from swing to rain forest to hip-hop to ecstasy jazz.

    And to get back on track, Fundamentalists do music, humor, and science, like kindergartners playing house. They not only have no real understanding of it, and unwittingly do an hilariously poor and simplified send up of it, but they are utterly clueless as to how obvious it it that they don’t know what the difference is.

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