Prayer in Schools Key to Stopping Violence


The Worldnutdaily is pushing for a major ramping up of the culture wars in an attempt to re-Christianize American culture to avoid violence (never mind that religious belief correlates with higher rates of violence, not less). David Lane of the American Renewal Project starts his crusade with a big ol’ lie:

“How is it possible that violent crime in the United States has surged by more than 460 percent since 1960?” – Joel Rosenberg

It hasn’t, of course. This is a textbook example of how to lie with statistics. You just have to pick your beginning year carefully. 1960 was a low year for violent crime, with a rate of 161 violent crimes per 100,000 residents. That started to go up sharply in 1965, when it jumped over 200, and it went up steadily until the early 90s, to almost 800 violent crimes per 100,000 people. And then it started to go down and it has continued to go down pretty steadily since then. A small jump in 2011 was the first annual rise in two decades. But now that we’ve got the dishonesty out of the way, let’s get to solutions:

In 1963 the disrespectful-of-religion Supreme Court removed the Bible from public schools – by an 8-1 majority vote. “It led not to true neutrality with respect to religion, but to the establishment of a religion of secularism.” – Justice Potter Stewart, the lone dissenter.

You see this, right? The “adversary” of a Christian nation disconnected the tie-in to God from public education – and America’s children – in 1963.

The adversary sheathed the Sword.

Actually, what the court did was rule out mandatory prayer and Bible reading in public schools. Because if it isn’t unconstitutional to force a child to recite a government-written prayer, what possibly could be? I find it amusing that the same people who rant about the evils of government are fine with the government telling their kids how to pray.

America was a Christian nation. The Mayflower Compact declared, “In the name of God, Amen. We whose names are underwritten, having undertaken – for the glory of God, and advancement of the Christian faith …”

Yes, but the Mayflower Compact didn’t have anything to do with America as any nation at all, Christian or otherwise. It established only a single colony and that colony was a theocracy, not a democracy with anything vaguely resembling religious freedom. We overthrew that colonial rule in 1776 in a little war you might have heard about.

Let’s decide if America is a Christian nation or a pagan nation – and get on with it; the sooner the better.

My intent is to put God, prayer and the Bible back into public schools as a principal component of education. Some experts say it would take 1) a constitutional amendment; others say 2) a simple 50 percent plus 1 vote in the House and Senate (U.S. Constitution, Article III, Section 2).

Pick your poison – either approach is fine with me.

Can you picture what America would look like following a decade-long war – a knock-down drag-out – to return God, prayer and the Bible to the public schools? To regain our Christian heritage and re-establish a Christian culture?

Yep. It will look just like it does now, with you saying endlessly stupid things and the rest of us pointing and laughing at you.

Comments

  1. cjcolucci says

    Where did this idea that there is no prayer in the public schools come from? There will be prayer in public schools as long as there is algebra. Obviously, you can’t disrupt a class with chanting or davening, or kneeling on a prayer rug in the middle of a lesson, but such common-sense accommodations aside, there is absolutely no prohibition on prayer in public schools. What there is is a prohibition on government prayer. And what sort of decent and devout person wants government-written, or government-sponsored, or government-approved prayer?

  2. bobafuct says

    So I guess implicit in this is that all teachers/principals/superintendents that don’t meet some particular Christian litmus test would need to be fired and replaced by Christians who meet this standard. Good thing Christians have a solid, consistent set of beliefs that all its adherents share to the same degree, or this might cause some problems….

  3. erichoug says

    Ask him if he minds Mormon Theology being taught to his kids and then when he says “Yes” tell him to sit down and shut the fuck up.

  4. slc1 says

    Joel Rosenberg, a man who write totally nutcase novels. As I stated in previous comments on this blog, I started to read one of he novels, never having heard of him before, and stopped after about 15 pages as it was totally insane. He is also a member of the McLean Bible Church, a storehouse of whackos.

  5. says

    Can you picture what America would look like following a decade-long war – a knock-down drag-out – to return God, prayer and the Bible to the public schools?

    It’d look a lot like Dover, PA. How much did they spend? And how many of the original school board who preached that particular crusade are left?

    It’s like he’s looking at Vietnam and wondering, “should we commit troops to help defeat communism there, again?” Wow, that sounds like a winning strategy!

  6. says

    I know how to nip this in the bud. Introduce parents to the new teacher, Mohammed al Hussein, who will be leading their children in their morning* prayers.

    * And early afternoon, and late afternoon, and evening …

  7. says

    cjcolucci, didn’t you know? The government is evil and can do absolutely nothing right.
    Except bomb the shit out of dark-colored people and, apparently, lead children in Christian prayers.

  8. says

    Marcus Ranum:

    In fairness to the people of Dover, they voted out the entire slate of theocrats (most of whom were actually appointed to fill vacancies in the first place) shortly before Judge Jones issued his ruling. It’s why the school district never appealed and also why Crazy Uncle Pat told them to prepare for a smiting.

    Fifth dentist:

    How fast would Lane change his position if that were to happen? Can the people at CERN measure time intervals that short?

  9. anubisprime says

    The argument , or the whining rather, about prayer in schools is not really the point.
    It seems that the mouth piece xtians everywhere are in major martyr mood.
    They are apparently repressed, discriminated against, and suffer intolerance everyday.

    Apart from the fact that they are not exactly coherent or cogent on just how they are being repressed, discriminated against, and how they are not tolerated is a bit of a mystery.
    But it does not seem to phase them they have no actual prima facie evidence to back up their claims, after all with the audience they are complaining to and want to enrage are themselves a bit dim and not exactly au fait with the back story, or indeed particularly the reasons why, certain rules are enacted.
    But mutter ‘jeebus’ and you have your militia!

    That is not what these mewling dog whistles are about, it is not for an in depth analysis of the claim of oppression, it is to pretend that xtianity in under some vague but apparently substantial attack from shadowy but definitely Obama supporters with the liberal and atheistic/teh ghey coalition with their agenda to throw jeebus under the bus.

    That is all the audience needs to be informed of!
    And most believe it…cos they ain’t really clever enough to smell the stench of self aggrandisement and social manipulation.
    And definitely not cute enough to realize the political marionetteing going on depending on state or county electioneering.

    It is the same old dog whistle though, which means they have little else, beside guns, evolutionary theory, and women’s reproductive rights to rant and rave about.

    It is a sign of a failing and imploding meme, which has held sway for nearly 2000yrs, and recent polling on the question of the supremacy of religion is not in the least to their collective taste, it has seemingly seen its best days.
    Now more then ever they must pretend that religion is being attacked, not that folk are growing up intellectually.
    The whole tacky tawdry pack of lies is falling and they are panicking, the claims will get more and ever so fantastical in the final death throes, it will get embarrassing for them.
    They have no where else to go, except overboard and ridiculous!

    They want to set their delusion centre front, the only way is to establish a theocracy completely separate from secular government, they will consider arms as a definite solution if all else fails, that is why the principle of ownership must be preserved…the thing is all else is failing, and they are fast running out of time!
    They are pretending that they are in a corner here, they want conflict, because that is and always has been the final solution for xianity, that feels threatened, that is their ‘get out of jail’ card!

    Up until now it has been a successful tactic, but there are no guarantees and the times have indeed changed and not in a helpful way!
    Their choices are slim getting slimmer, and that clock is ticking relentlessly, they have to decide soon, otherwise their dying nonsense will be dead and rotting while the land of jeebus will be gone…for good!
    So the first shots are always horror stories about how their belief is about to become unlawful.
    It is what they always say before they line up in battle dress!

  10. John Hinkle says

    anubisprime – good comment. But…

    …the claims will get more and ever so fantastical in the final death throes, it will get embarrassing for them.

    Will?

  11. soul_biscuit says

    What’s he talking about here?

    My intent is to put God, prayer and the Bible back into public schools as a principal component of education. Some experts say it would take 1) a constitutional amendment; others say 2) a simple 50 percent plus 1 vote in the House and Senate (U.S. Constitution, Article III, Section 2).

    (1) is clear enough. A constitutional amendment could make the U.S. an officially Christian nation quite neatly. What about (2), though? Article III, section 2 is all about the jurisdiction of federal courts. It has nothing to do with Congress. (Except a passing reference to impeachment, but that would be an odd way to accomplish policy change.)

  12. jnorris says

    soul_biscuit, I believe David Lane believes Congress can pass a law forbidding the federal courts from hearing any cases involving mandatory True Christian Prayers and Bible Readings in public schools.

    Like so many, I want any True Christian to explain how a small double handful of men defeated their god so easily.

    As for picking a poison, what did the Reverend Jim Jones use

  13. ttch says

    soul_biscuit @ 12 / jnorris @ 14: The Federal court system could be explicitly stripped of jurisdiction over the proposed school prayer law. This has been done several times. Wikipedia has an article:

    Jurisdiction stripping
    .
    State courts could still find the law Federally unconstitutional, but you can bet certain states wouldn’t.

  14. soul_biscuit says

    The Federal court system could be explicitly stripped of jurisdiction over the proposed school prayer law.

    Of course, the Exceptions Clause is in Art. III § 2. Thanks!

  15. says

    “the claims will get more and ever so fantastical in the final death throes, it will get embarrassing for them.”

    I don’t think it’s embarassing for them so much as it is for genuine christians, the ones I actually get along with. It reminds me of the joke about the guy who gets to fuck a chicken for five bucks and then a week later gets into a peep show to watch a guy fuck a chicken–for twenty bucks.

    @ 13:

    Roger. If it’s a bible verse, they are likely MISquoting it or using the only part of the passage that actually supports their delusion.

  16. says

    If they were serious about preventing violence, shouldn’t they be promoting Buddhism? Or maybe the Jain faith. New Age tree worship would work, too.

    Seriously, how does promoting a death cult that effectively controls the US military, one with a centuries-long history of murder, war and genocide, prevent violence?

  17. sytec says

    @cjcolucci
    Exactly, and it is frustrating to me to read the crap on my fb feed (I’m in the Bible belt)… posted this the other day:

    They took prayer out of school??? Really? Well that’s news to me, and I’m a teacher, and I have one student who is devoutly catholic, and who prays (and I mean down on the knees, hands raised, prays) about 5 or so times in a 50 minute class. And he’s a great kid, and doesn’t disrupt class. So please, get off of it. Prayer was never taken out of school. I cannot tell (for example) this student that his beliefs, or way of praying is wrong. Do you really want teachers or principals or schools telling your children what they should pray for or how to do so? What if the principal or teacher or school is Jewish? or Muslim? or Hindu? Still ok with school sponsored prayer? Nobody took prayer out of schools, but someone from the school dictating “correct” beliefs and prayers (most wouldn’t want me in control of “spiritual guidance, I’m sure)…. well, I wouldn’t want that for any student.
    We also don’t confiscate Bibles or Korans or any other holy book… So, nobody removed God from school…. CLICK

Leave a Reply