Ken Ham Declares War


Young earth creationist con man Ken Ham went on the radio with Kevin Swanson of Generations Radio last week and they had an amusing conversation about a war of the worldviews, with Ham landing on Omaha beach and being just like the warriors of the Bible.

Ham: Evolution, millions of years, the naturalistic philosophy that permeates our education system, that’s really the religion of this age to explain life without God. And much of our church, our church leaders, have adopted that religion, sadly, and compromised it with God’s word.

Swanson: Ken, as you write this book, ‘Already Compromised,’ do you get the sense that you are effectively very, very close to Omaha Beach in the war of the worldviews? I mean, you are right there, where the ideas are being formulated, where the minds and the lives of the next generation are being formed by the millions across this country, I mean this is an important battle.

Ham: It is, it’s an extremely important battle. Because, you know what, it only takes one generation to lose a culture. That’s all it takes. And if you can capture one generation, you’ll have the culture. And just as, you know, when the Israelites crossed the Jordan river and there were 12 stones to remind the next generation of what God did and what did we find? They weren’t reminded, the next generation, they lost it in one generation, we’re losing this culture before our very eyes today because the church opened the door to allow the philosophy of naturalism, and evolution, millions of years, to permeate into God’s word. We need to shut that door. If we don’t shut that door, that’s where the battle’s at right now, if we don’t shut that door, we’re going to lose this culture, America will be the England and Europe of tomorrow.

Yes, it’s a metaphorical war. And Ham is on the side of stupidity and dishonesty.

Comments

  1. Ben P says

    Of all the goddamn silly things…..

    I mean seriously, I can kind of fathom making that kind of “we’re losing the culture, it only takes a generation of kids raised the wrong way” argument when you’re talking about public morality, public acceptance of homosexuality etc. Even then it’s a false argument looking at the past through rose colored glasses, a generation ago that was racism, but I can at least fathom making that kind of argument talking about moral conduct. There, it at least makes sense. You’ve got an absolute moral standard you’re measuring against, and you think, at least, society is falling away from that standard.

    But when you’re saying “we’re in a war and we’re losing the culture” in reference to children being taught the age of the world, you’ve got something seriously nutty in your worldview.

  2. raven says

    Swanson: Ken, as you write this book, ‘Already Compromised,’ do you get the sense that you are effectively very, very close to Omaha Beach in the war of the worldviews?

    This is one of the dumber fallacies of the fundies.

    There aren’t two worldviews. It’s a false dichotomy.

    There are thousands at least, or millions of worldviews, depending on where you draw the lines.

    Even most xians worldwide don’t share Ken Ham’s worldview. Even a lot of creationists don’t. Many are old earth creationists or intelligent design creationists who think the universe is a lot older than 6,000 years old. When creationists aren’t attacking science, they occasionally attack each other.

    Mostly because there is a limited amount of funding for their nonsense. They claim to be in it to save your sould but they really seem to like the money they get for not doing much useful.

  3. raven says

    Swanson: Ken, as you write this book, ‘Already Compromised,’ do you get the sense that you are effectively very, very close to Omaha Beach in the war of the worldviews?

    It’s more like the Battle of Berlin for the fundies.

    They are sitting in the wreckage of a destroyed city watching the tanks roll in towards them and wondering what went wrong.

    US xianity is dying, destroyed by xians like Ken Ham..

  4. anubisprime says

    Don Quijote @ 6

    “This is exciting, the USA can have all the royal families and the EU.”

    Your welcome!….strolls away whistling trying to look not quite so relived and feigning innocence!

  5. Larry says

    We need to shut that door.

    Translation: Hear no knowledge, see no knowledge, speak no knowledge.

    That is all Ham’s bastardized version christ-inanity is about. Shut the world and reality out.

  6. busterggi says

    “And if you can capture one generation, you’ll have the culture”

    You had the generations captured for thousands of years and humanity suffered for it. I for one do not want to go back to being your captive.

  7. roggg says

    I’ll give ham credit for one thing. He’s consistent. Painfully, ridiculously, uncompromisingly consistent. “Ken Ham declares war on reality. Film at 11.”

  8. says

    So owning one generation leads to a takeover of the culture. Where have I heard that before?
    Oh, yeah: “He alone, who owns the youth, gains the future.”

  9. noastronomer says

    “…very close to Omaha Beach in the war of the worldviews…”

    We’re already on the beach and people like Ham and Swanson are on the bluffs looking down on us as, but already the infantry has outmaneuvered the static defenses . Their fall is inevitable.

    “if we don’t shut that door, we’re going to lose this culture, America will be the England and Europe of tomorrow.”

    I’m sure that at some point Pocahontas thought exactly the same thing and she was right.

    Mike.

  10. says

    @fifthdentist:

    So owning one generation leads to a takeover of the culture.

    Yes, indeed. Once Obama usurps the authority of congress to enact his Esperanto-only law, the rest will follow quickly. Vi estas liaj sklavoj.

  11. says

    Off topic bleg (Ed — please delete if not appropriate and accept my aplogies) but in the interest of good science for high school students. And this post is somewhat related to bad science, sooooooo…

    I gave a talk to high school students on how the Higgs field produces mass and how the Higgs boson was discovered.

    It is here.

    I’d be interested in any feedback to make it better since I plan to give it to another high school. Don’t post comments here, send constructive criticism to david.heddle at cnu dot edu.

    Or not.

    </bleg>

  12. baal says

    “in the interest of good science for high school students” <–that statement has me worried given your worship of the supernatural. I flipped through the talk but will leave it to someone who is actually good at physics to comment on field vs particle. I do take exception to your assertion that there is a god field everywhere. The metaphor is weak to begin with but the hand of god is making everything have mass? It's a bit much.

  13. says

    Baal,

    I didn’t make up the term “god particle” or “god field”. It was invented by secular scientists and popularized by the media–I actually don’t like it at all but trying to undo it is tilting at windmills. The exception you take is not with me, but with the scientists (secular) who coined the term. Go after Nobel Laureate Leon Lederman.

  14. Doug Little says

    heddle @15,

    Just for reference you might want to check out Sean Carroll’s attempt at explaining the Higgs Mechanism.

    I think that it is also important to highlight that the Higgs field contributes very little mass to real particles most of their mass comes from QCD.

  15. Doug Little says

    heddle,

    Well to be fair the scientists referred to it as the God damned particle. It was the media that shortened it to the God particle not wanting to piss off the delicate sensibilities of the Christians of the time.

  16. says

    Doug Little #18,

    Thanks! He actually states (correctly, of course) that most of the mass of real objects comes from QCD. What he means is that the mass of a complicated beastie like the proton comes from this:

    1) The mass of the fundamental particles (in this case quarks) , which comes from the Higgs mechanism, and
    2) Additional mass from the interaction (QCD) that confines the quarks (and gluons, and other quarks) into a big old messy proton.

    The importance of the Higgs mechanism is in providing the mass of the bare fundamental particles.

    I believe that is a very good fact to point out. to the high school students that there is more to the mass of a “real” object (proton) than the sum of the masses (from the Higgs mechanism) of the three constituent quarks. Thanks again.

    What is missing from his short talk (IMO) is a picture of how a field might create mass. That is what I was shooting for.

  17. says

    Doug Little,

    Well to be fair the scientists referred to it as the God damned particle. It was the media that shortened it to the God particle not wanting to piss off the delicate sensibilities of the Christians of the time.

    Is that a joke? (Seriously, is it?) Because, of course, it’s not true.

    And to be fair all around, the Higgs field is extremely mysterious. All other fields have a known source. Charge, current, mass, QCD “color”, etc. The Higss field is postulated to be everywhere in the universe, with no known source of the field.

    The universe is an amazing place.

  18. Doug Little says

    heddle, of course it is.

    It wasn’t even Lederman’s choice. “He wanted to refer to it as that ‘goddamn particle’ and his editor wouldn’t let him,” says Higgs.

    Reference

  19. Doug Little says

    heddle,

    Also why we are on the topic of your talk, the diagram with the charge inside the block and with the spring scales needs to depict the charge in the middle of the block as a positive one for clarity. I guess you could actually ask your audience what the sign of the charge should be to see if they have been listening, a little interaction can be a good thing.

    I would add Sean’s motivation for why they started thinking about the Higgs Mech in the first place, I found this to be a unique idea when it comes to explaining the Higgs Mech that I hadn’t seen before in any other article.

  20. slc1 says

    Re Heddle @ #20

    To be entirely accurate, the binding forces that hold the proton together have effectively negative mass as otherwise the proton would be unstable (e.g. the binding energy of a proton has to be negative).

  21. Michael Heath says

    Thanks for sharing heddle. That’s easily the most comprehensible explanation I’ve encountered.

  22. criticaldragon1177 says

    Ed Brayton,

    You’re right, if Ken Ham is in a war, he’s definitely on the side of stupidity and dishonesty.

  23. grumpyoldfart says

    Because, you know what, it only takes one generation to lose a culture.

    As the Christian missionaries are well aware.

  24. dingojack says

    Ken as Cardigan? Hardly. More like Brig. Gen. James H. Ledlie at the Battle of the Crater.

    And now for a little game:

    Q: Where’s Kenny?

    Dingo
    ——–
    A: Safe & sound in England guarding the rubber tanks of FUSAG.

  25. slc1 says

    Re dingojack @ #33

    Cardigan was just following orders. As Tennyson put it, “there’s was not to reason why, there’s was but to do or die”. The real author of the clusterfuck was Lord Lucan who ordered the charge.

  26. dingojack says

    Lucan carried the orders with verbal instructions to attack the battery on the near right side of the valley, defensively.But the instructions were contradictory so instead of a awaiting more and clearer orders from Raglan, Cardigan disregard the orders he was given and made up his own, deciding to attack the battery at the rear of the valley.
    This was largely due to Cardigan and Lucan (who were brothers in law) hating each other’s guts.
    After the battle, it is said, the Russians smelt the Englishman’s breath believing that they must have been drunk to make such a risky, daring attack.
    Tennyson was not in the Crimea at the time, so cannot be regarded as a reliable source (but a hell of good poem though)*.
    Dingo
    ——-
    * I think of it as being anti-war (the whole Crimean Campaign was very unpopular, kinda like the US’s foray into Iraq). It totally wrecked Cardigan’s reputation as a commander, and as a person. (What a damned shame!)

    ‘Theirs was was not to wonder why
    Theirs was not make reply
    Theirs was but to do — and die’.

  27. says

    Cardigan was just following orders

    It’s not that simple. Cardigan was following some orders, but his battlefield awareness was so poor that it’s certain that the orders he was following were not the orders he was given.Some of that might lie with Nolan, who apparently made a vague hand-gesture toward the guns at the redoubt, not the flank, and, of course, the orders were not written in imbecile so Cardigan couldn’t be expected to understand them.

    (BTW, now, if you want to read written orders raised to fine art, Wellington’s are masterpieces of clarity and brevity. If Wellington had been at Balaclava he’d have probably been facepalming so hard … )

  28. says

    It totally wrecked Cardigan’s reputation as a commander, and as a person.

    The black bottle affair already accomplished that. The Charge was a culmination, of sorts, for a case-study in why putting your upper-class twits in charge of military units is a bad idea. But Cardigan’s entire career appears to have been an exercise in making fools like Petraeus look good in comparison.

    For those of you who are amused by victorian military hijinks, Cardigan gets a pretty amazing sequence of hatchet-jobs throughout George MacDonald Fraser’s “Flashman” books, as “Lord Haw-haw” …

  29. dingojack says

    The orders given by Wellington (at Waterloo) ordering his men to re-occupy a partially burned out farm house are a masterpiece. They are clear in purpose, grammatically correct, beautifully written in perfect copperplate and show a great deal of care (he warned his men to watch out for burnt out floorboards). At the time his centre was under attack from the fortified farm in front of the English lines and he was moving the troops on his right flank and the centre to rest the latter and bring in fresh troops into a trouble spot.
    Later he observed ‘It was a damn-near thing. It would not have done had I not been there!’
    Dingo

  30. Draken says

    The military comparison reminded me of this old gem from the FSM site:

    Letting the religious right teach intelligent design in schools is like letting the Marines teach poetry in advanced combat training. As a scientist, I see these the relevancy between the two sets to be equal.
    — J. Simon, PhD

  31. says

    @dingojack – my favorite piece of Balaclava trivia was the way the Scots regiments under Colin Campbell avoided dysentery by camping up-river from the English regiments. It would appear that drinking the assorted byproducts of the Scotsmen felled more Englishmen in that battle than the Russians did.

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