Keeping the Sabbeth Holy


This cracks me up. The Oklahoma legislature passed a bill to put a Ten Commandments monument on the state capitol grounds and it was installed recently. Unfortunately — or fortunately, for us — they misspelled two words on the monument.

But before state Rep. Mike Ritze (R), who sponsored the initial bill and whose family donated $10,000 to fund the project, worries about fielding a suit from the state’s American Civil Liberties Union, he first needs to deal with spelling errors, The Oklahoman reports.

The rose-stone block reads “Sabbeth” instead of “Sabbath.”

And at its base, the tenth commandment reads, “Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor’s wife, nor his manservant, nor his maidseruent.” It should read “maidservant.”

“It’s a simple fix,” Ritze told The Oklahoman. “Scrivener’s errors or misspellings are not uncommon with monument manufacturing.”

Uh, no. They’re not. They might be in an initial run, but for it to be delivered and installed that way is just plain incompetence. Of course, the thing shouldn’t be there at all. The placement of such monuments is just a case of fundamentalist Christians marking their territory. But it isn’t their territory, it’s ours too.

Comments

  1. Doug Little says

    The rose-stone block reads “Sabbeth” instead of “Sabbath.”

    I’m sure Ozzy Osbourne and Tony Iommi will be disappointed.

  2. hexidecima says

    and just what sabbath are they talking about? The friday night/Saturday Jewish nonsense or the Sunday Christian stuff. If *I* were a god, I’d certainly be miffed if my chosen people got it wrong and bothered me on my day off.

  3. Nancy New, Queen of your Regulatory Nightmare says

    When I was a kid, a local baptist congregation built a new church–and for months, until they could get it corrected, their new church was the “Cavalry Temple.”

    That still makes me happy.

  4. mommiest says

    Is it actually an easy fix? I don’t know much about this stuff, but aren’t those errors, um, engraved in stone?

  5. Pierce R. Butler says

    Now we know why Roy Moore and the other courthouse-commandments fetishists usually opt for the Reader’s Digest Condensed “For Dummies” versions.

  6. woodsong says

    Is it actually an easy fix? I don’t know much about this stuff, but aren’t those errors, um, engraved in stone?

    I had the opportunity to ask that question of a professional. Changing one letter to another isn’t that difficult–you mix stone dust of the right color with epoxy, fill in the letter to change, wait until it sets firmly, then carve it again. It’s much more of a pain in the ass when a letter has been left out entirely, as the entire word has to be filled in and re-blocked. If it’s a word in the middle of a longer sentence, centered on the stone block, that can be a major fix. And, of course, if it’s the stonecarver’s fault it was misspelled, as opposed to whoever commissioned the work, the fix is expected to be free.

  7. Tualha says

    When the local godless folk challenge this in court, I’m sure all the hate mail and death threats they get from their good christian neighbors will be rife with misspellings too.

  8. says

    Moses also had a problem with V1, so he just broke ‘em and and moved on to V2. Maybe that’ll work.

    For some reason this reminds me of the first thesis I supervised. It had the words CLAS Detector in the title. The publisher, probably laughing at those pointy headed physicists, changed it to CLASS Detector. We had to explain that CLAS was an acronym (CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer–actually a nested acronym) not a word.

  9. raven says

    Fundie xianity induced cognitive impairment strikes again.

    Haven’t they ever heard of spellcheck?

    Or did they just mistake a dictionary for a science textbook and throw it out?

  10. Chiroptera says

    As an atheist who is a staunch advocate for separation of church and state, may I offer a compromise? I say keep the monument in place…with the misspellings. Keep it as a monument to the basic illiteracy and ignorance of the contemporary US right wing.

  11. freebird says

    To miss errors like this begs the question, why does it really need to be there if no one is actually going to read it?

  12. baal says

    @16 freebird – to make sure the hand of god surrounds that building and continues to enforce the xtain will a.k.a. it doesn’t have to be read, it’s magic (literally).

  13. busterggi says

    Still not too bad for folks who don’t read beyond a 3rd grade comprehension level. And its not the version actually called the Ten Commandments in their magic book anyways.

    Hey Sabbot! I can’t help it, every time I see or hear that word…

  14. Didaktylos says

    The question is – did the carver make the mistake or did he faithfully transcribe a poorly proofread script?

  15. John Hinkle says

    I wonder if the stone mason was wearing one of those “Fred Flintstoned” T-shirts while carving the letters.

  16. Larry says

    So the genius using MS Word© for Tablets couldn’t even be bothered to turn on spell check. Hell, even Clippy would have caught those typos.

    And who was on proofreading duty the day they shipped that thing?

  17. says

    When the local godless folk challenge this in court, I’m sure all the hate mail and death threats they get from their good christian neighbors will be rife with misspellings too.

    My favorite was an email the ACLU received during the Giles County 10 Commandments flap:

    You folks are allowing Satin to rule you!!! … Following Satin is such and easy out following Jesus is the challenge and thus makes us Christians stronger.

    The sad thing was that the author was a teacher in the school district.

  18. frog says

    Speaking strictly from my position of many years on the production side of book publishing:

    Let’s not mock the fundies for typos and misspellings. Such errors are rife regardless of religion/atheism or educational level. If I had a dollar for every error a tenured professor left in their manuscript before handing it over to my department, I could retire.

    If I had a dollar for every person claiming to be a great proofreader, I could retire and bring some friends with me. I don’t think there is a bigger pool of Dunning-Kruger Fail than people who think they have good grammar/spelling skills and can proofread. (Even worse than people who think they’re good drivers.)

    Yes, fundies are more likely to leave illiterate screeds lying around the internet. But at the level of general literacy, the smartest people make the dumbest mistakes all the damn time. This keeps me gainfully employed.

  19. grumpyoldfart says

    Just for the record, here’s the real story about the ten commandments as told in the bible (not preached from the pulpit):
    `

    Nobody knows what was written on the first stone tablets because Moses smashed them.
    `

    God later organised a new set of tablets and wrote on them the same words that were on the broken set (Exodus 34:1).
    `

    Those commandments are listed in Exodus 34:14-26.
    `

    Then, just so there can be no mistake, in Exodus 34:28 the bible clearly states that those laws “…are the words of the covenant, the ten commandments.”
    `

    The stuff on the Oklahoma monument comes from Exodus 20. Those rules were not written on stone and they were not called the ten commandments – that phrase first appears in Exodus 34:28.

  20. Bjarni says

    #22 reminds me… On eBay I once bought a furry ladies muff with satan lining. Very nice it was too.

  21. Aliasalpha says

    Maybe it was someone taking the piss. An angry dick comes into the shop venting about the destruction of society as we know it because there’s no ten commandments monument, gives the stonemason the bit of paper complete with typos and says “I want this, exactly!”, the stonemason sees the typos and decides is is one of the times where the customer is always right, especially when the result of that is them looking like a complete tool and carves exactly what the paper says.

  22. Lonely Panda, e.s.l. says

    It has the last commandment written as “Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor’s wife, nor his manservant, nor his maidseruant, nor his cattle, nor anything that is thy neighbors.”

    So in addition to the maidseruant, there’s also a problem of a missing possessive apostrophe.

  23. evilDoug says

    “…missing possessive apostrophe.”

    Perhaps what happened to the Planet Express ship and it’s its crew after Leela made an issue of a statuary apostrophe caused that to be overlooked.

  24. blf says

    the tenth commandment reads, “Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor’s wife, nor his manservant, nor his maidseruent.”

    Oh for feck’s sake, drop the euphemisms: “Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor’s wife, nor his slaveboys, nor his slavegirls.”

  25. says

    frog@24:

    Yeahhhh, No. Fuck ‘em.

    It’s been said that sunshine is the best disinfectant (pretty sure that no longer applies) but laughter is prolly the best way to let the asshats in the OK lege know what fuckwads they are.

  26. skinnercitycyclist says

    When I was a kid, a local baptist congregation built a new church–and for months, until they could get it corrected, their new church was the “Cavalry Temple.”

    I often hear the word “Calvary” used in place of “cavalry” in my perusal of right wing podcast, as in “the calvary are coming.”

    As a public school teacher, I am just happy I can enjoy ignorance for its own sake.

  27. peterh says

    @ #25:

    Must you spoil a good pie fight by dragging facts into the matter?

    @ #26:

    I’ve often wondered about that sort of thing (fur coats being a bit more common these days than muffs); wouldn’t the garment be more protection against cold by having the fur on the inside? One reason I don’t like satin and similar fabrics is they’re cold!

  28. kermit. says

    blf: Oh for feck’s sake, drop the euphemisms: “Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor’s wife, nor his slaveboys, nor his slavegirls.”

    At the time of the King James translation, there was little difference.

    When my daughter and I were watching “Ever After” a vaguely Renaissance version of Cinderella, she was horrified when the evil stepmother tried to sell some household servants. My daughter’s idea of “servant” was more Batman’s Alfred than a medieval serf. If I recall correctly, in the Old Testament captured members of an enemy tribe (usually young girls) were taken as “servants”, and weren’t called slaves, which sounds strange to modern ears.

  29. says

    @kermit, that’s “servants” as in “sex slaves,” is what was meant back in those times.
    If they just wanted servants, I’m sure the men would have been much better at plowing and hauling and building things.

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