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SD GOP Displays Anti-Intellectualism, Provincialism

There are few things in this world that bother me more than that folksy, gee whiz, aren’t the little people so much better than those pointy-headed intellectuals bullshit we hear so often from the right wing. The South Dakota GOP just put out an ad for a House candidate that puts this provincial anti-intellectualism on stark display. You see, while the Democrat was busy getting college degrees and traveling the world working on environmental problems, the Republican was home running the family farm. As though that was a qualification for office. But hey, she did win an award from a soybean association. They did everything but claim that he once ate a meal with French cheese and arugula.

Comments

  1. davidct says

    That would pretty much sum up the position of President Andrew Jackson. We have for some reason not been able to grow beyond this attitude.

  2. =8)-DX says

    I’ve learned a lot from this: Varilek seems to be a much more accomplished candidate than Noem. And the global warming conspiracy must be true: why else would the scientists, activists and media people need to be bribed with huge quantities of corn dogs, beer and Jägermeister?

  3. says

    “While the Democrat party candidate, Smarty McSmartypants, was a-book learnin’, breathing through his nose, and brushing his teeth, our candidate, Real American Joe, was shaking his fist at the rain, Bible believin’, and stewing in his own bodily wastes. Smarty McSmartypans; bad for South Dakota, bad for America. Real American Joe, good for Freedom and Liberty and Freedom. America, on November the [pounds foot six times], put America first and choose America, America.”

  4. says

    IMO the historical record shows quite clearly that parochial-minded politicians with little to no experience of the outside world are on average less competent at:

    - discerning the best interests of their constituents & the polities they are expected to govern
    - succesfully advocating for, defending, or advancing those interests
    - implementing policy meant to accomplish such ends

    when compared to politicians with broader intellectual, experiential & ethical horizons.

  5. michaelraymer says

    What amused me was how the ad doesn’t even take a stance on global warming directly, but rather seems to assume most South Dakota voters already “know” it’s a liberal conspiracy. Sadly, that is likely the popular opinion in such a solidly red state. At least I get trying to scare up votes by mentioning the evil cap and trade, but the corn dog thing makes little sense…

  6. says

    Yeah, ask Missy Bachman about “corn dogs” and how much she liked the photos that were all over the web the day after her visit to the IA State Fair.

    “SD GOP Displays Anti-Intellectualism, Provincialism”

    Ed, you say this as if they might have stopped doing that at some point and then, recently, come to their senses.

    Lets not forget Bill Janklow former SD AG Governor for 16 years and U.S. Representative who only resigned after he was convicted of MV manslaughter for killing a motorcyclist while driving drunk. Political fuckbaggery is not news in SD.

  7. thalwen says

    Soybean farm? Soy is one of them fancy newfangled foods that they serve in them sushi places. And it produces estrogen that’s making all our boys gay. Soybean farm, psht, what a snob!

  8. lancifer says

    Corn dogs, thats an odd thing to focus on? I would think that most South Dakotans would be in favor of corn dogs.

    But, if you are living in South Dakota you may very well prefer to be represented by a farmer than by an environmentalist, cap and trade investment consultant.

  9. Sastra says

    That ad was hilarious. It’s almost as if the publicity people were up one night, worried at how unqualified their candidate was in comparison to the other candidate, and someone who’d had a few more beers than the others went “Hey! What if we turn it around, and pretend like the other guy has a problem!” Then they got all giggly and did it … and the next morning someone found the ad before it could be erased. The rest is history.

    The corn dog thing puzzled me, too. The message seems to be that this Matt Varilek doesn’t DESERVE to be eating and serving beer and corn dogs! He lived in fancy-schmanzy places like Scotland. Let him try making people eat haggis!

    I like that the woman was shown getting her power and expertise in such a womanly way: growing food, raising her family, and talking to the old folks. Not threatening or anything.

  10. reddiaperbaby1942 says

    “They did everything but claim that he once ate a meal with French cheese and arugula.”
    Actually, I don’t think arugula is the trendy, yuppie thing anymore. I’m not really very up on these things (I like old-fashioned romaine myself), but I ate out at a couple of cafés and the food was served with some new kind of leaves, green with thin reddish stems, quite nice actually. I think this may be the new curse of the lefty, liberal intellectual latte-drinker.

  11. jnorris says

    So don’t vote for Mitt because instead of working summers in the family automobile factory he went off to France.

  12. says

    “So don’t vote for Mitt because instead of working summers in the family automobile factory he went off to France.”

    That is just soooooooooooooooo unfair. We all know that Mittmoroni only did that so that others could go that Incochinese tropical resort.

    “But, if you are living in South Dakota you may very well prefer to be represented by a farmer than by an environmentalist, cap and trade investment consultant.”

    Youbetcha, lancedfuck. Just like all of the congressional delegation from Montana are shepherds and the ones from Maine are all lobsterman.

    She couldn’t even deliver on the Agwelfare bill that her constituents, those rock-ribbed individualsists are keening for. Maybe it’s because she’s spent too much time canning peaches and making quilts.

  13. says

    The values dissonance is so thick that it seemed to be straight up endorsing the democratic candidate during the whole comparison section. It’s honestly disturbing that this was made with the assumption that “running a family farm” was a more of a qualifier than “got a degree, started campaigning for something”.

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