Farah’s Old Time End Times Religion


Joseph Farah is joining the litany of Christians proclaiming that the end is hear in this column, which is based on the “prophecies” of a 13th century rabbi named Judah Ben Samuel who was alleged to have “performed many miracles.” And he’s got his golly gee amplifier turned up to 11:

The prophecy involves the Jubilee Year cycle every 50 years. I should point out there’s much controversy about pinpointing Jubilee Years because they have been observed in Israel since ancient times, while no one is 100 percent certain about when they should occur on the modern Hebrew calendar.

However, in the year Judah Ben Samuel died in 1217, he prophesied that the Ottoman Turks would rule over the holy city of Jerusalem for eight Jubilees. Now, keep in mind, he made this prediction 300 years before the Turks seized control of Jerusalem in 1517. In fact, the Ottoman Empire, as it would become to be known, did not even really exist yet in 1217.

According to Judah Ben Samuel, 1217 was a Jubilee Year. If he was right, that would also make 1517 a Jubilee Year.

Exactly 400 years after the Ottoman Turks took control of Jerusalem in 1517, they were driven out of the city and the Holy Land in 1917 by the Allied forces under the command of Gen. George Allenby – on Hanukkah, by the way.

Holy coincidences, Batman! There’s more:

The rabbi also prophesied that during the ninth Jubilee Jerusalem would be a “no-man’s land.” This is exactly what happened from 1917 to 1967, due to the fact that the Holy Land was placed under British Mandate in 1917 by the League of Nations and literally “belonged” to no nation. Even after Israel’s war of independence in 1948-49 Jerusalem was still divided by a strip of land running right through the heart of the city, with Jordan controlling the eastern part of the city and Israel controlling the western part of the city. That strip of land was considered and even called “no-man’s land” by both the Israelis and the Jordanians.

So if you translate “no man’s land” to mean “not controlled by any nation but by all nations,” this seems accurate. But if this “prophet” had meant that, why didn’t he say that? This is the kind of semantic game that is always played by those who believe such “prophecies.” It’s the same nonsense that followers of Nostradamus engage in, take a vague phrase from long ago and translate it into some modern circumstance. For Farah, that means the end is near:

The rabbi also prophesied that during the 10th Jubilee, Jerusalem would be under the control of the Jews and the Messianic “end times” would begin. The 10th Jubilee began in 1967 and will be concluded in – 2017.

What should we expect to happen in 2017? I will leave that to your imagination.

Of course, the fact that this rabbi undoubtedly thought he was predicting the first appearance rather than the second, since as a Jew he did not believe that Jesus was the messiah, seems to have missed Farah completely.

Comments

  1. busterggi says

    Why is this Christian using the work of a Jewish scholar – isn’t the NT good enough for him?

  2. lynxreign says

    I’d bet the entire thing is either fudged dates, wild interpretations or bad translation, especially the part about “Ottoman” rule. It isn’t that “the Ottoman Empire, as it would become to be known, did not even really exist yet in 1217.”, the founder wouldn’t even be born for 50 years. The whole thing smacks of retrofitting and ridiculous interpretation.
    Oh, and the Ottomans took Jerusalem in 1516, not 1517.

  3. Reginald Selkirk says

    especially the part about “Ottoman” rule. It isn’t that “the Ottoman Empire, as it would become to be known, did not even really exist yet in 1217.”, the founder wouldn’t even be born for 50 years.

    Just a misunderstanding. He’s talking about furniture, not empire.

  4. matty1 says

    It is not even clear that Rabbi Samuel wrote what is attributed to him. Neither wikipedia or other mainstream reference sites I can find mention it and all mentions are by Christianists.

    The oldest reference I can find goes all the way back to 2008 when someone called Ludwig Schneider wrote about it in a magazine called Israel Today aimed at Jewish converts to Christianity.

    In short this may not even be a Nostrodamus situation where they use old texts as Rorsach ink blots. Instead it seems to be a straightforward lie made up in the last few years and attributed to a historical figure.

  5. machintelligence says

    If you have the side of a barn peppered with arrows, each one in the center of a bull’s-eye, you either have one hell of an archer, or someone drew the bull’s-eyes in afterwards.

  6. AsqJames says

    This is exactly what happened from 1917 to 1967, due to the fact that the Holy Land was placed under British Mandate in 1917 by the League of Nations and literally “belonged” to no nation.

    With its ability to time travel into the past it’s a mystery why the League of Nations failed so spectacularly really.

    Yes, I know it’s a little nit-picky, the Brits did kick the Ottomans out of Palestine then and there was the Balfour Declaration, but that was armed conquest. The legal niceties of getting the League of Nations to endorse the Mandate had to happen later because the League didn’t exist until later.

    That’s the kind of fudging of details needed to make this sort of bollocks seem to work. Now I know nothing of 13th century Jewish Rabbis, or the history of the Ottoman Empire, but surely everyone (or almost everyone anyway) knows that the League of Nations was formed after WW1 and the date of the ending of that war*. If he’s twisted and misrepresented things I know about, I can’t trust him on any of the other facts.

    * – The start date seems more contentious. While the whole horses and bayonets kerfuffle was going on I kept hearing/reading things about the US Navy “in 1916″ or “pre-WW1″ or, even more explicit, “before the start of WW1″, with those terms seemingly used interchangeably. Not exactly nails-on-a-blackboard annoying, but I kept wanting to point out 1916 was right in the middle of the damn thing.

  7. janeymack says

    AsqJames #8–The war started earlier, certainly, but U.S. involvement didn’t happen until 1917, so from an American standpoint (really the only relevant issue as far as the “horses & bayonets kerfuffle” is concerned), 1916 *was* “pre-WWI.”

  8. davidbrown says

    Picky historical point #45,762:

    General Edmund Henry Hynman Allenby (later Field Marshal 1st Viscount Allenby), not “George Allenby”, led the British forces that took Jerusalem.

    Brought to you by The Society for Making Sure You Damn Well Get Things Right on the Internet.

  9. says

    However, in the year Judah Ben Samuel died in 1217, he prophesied that the Ottoman Turks would rule over the holy city of Jerusalem for eight Jubilees. Now, keep in mind, he made this prediction 300 years before the Turks seized control of Jerusalem in 1517. In fact, the Ottoman Empire, as it would become to be known, did not even really exist yet in 1217.

    Wow. That’s pretty damned impressive prophecy right there, considering that ol’ Osman, the founder of the Ottoman dynasty, wasn’t born until 40 years after Judah Ben Samuel died. Also, I can literally find nothing save secondary or tertiary sources on the internet that reference the prophecy. There are no direct quotes and no proof of source documents. His writings were apparently simply rediscovered a few years back.

    This, um, this smells a mite fishy…

  10. AsqJames says

    janeymack #9 – Yes, I know the yanks turned up late for both World Wars. And the US-centric perspective is entirely understandable when discussing the fallout of a US presidential debate. I didn’t comment at the time partly for that reason (and also ‘cos it’s a petty thing to comment on). But I do think it’s indicative of a wider attitude that the US perspective is the only valid one. It’s by no means universal in the US, and I’m sure its equivalent exists (to varying degrees) in every country. It was just something that struck me at the time.

  11. Quodlibet says

    And it’s only because we have imposed a decimal system (10, 20, 30…) on time that we even notice events that occur every 50, 100, 1000 years…

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