The Church’s Low Bar for Miracles »« Egyptian Man Speaks Out Against Blasphemy Laws

LaBarbera Goes Gaga for G.A.G.A.

The deranged Peter LaBarbera of Americans for Truth About Homosexuality thinks he’s finally found some gay people who are on his side. He claims to have received an anonymous letter from a group calling itself Gays Against the Gay Agenda, or GAGA. Here’s the letter he says he received:

We are a group of gay men and women who want to join the fight against the gay political agenda because we know the truth.

Here are a few of our stories. Names have been changed for our safety:

From Abe: I was sexually molested by a neighbor when I was young. I was in counseling for years but as a teen started having gay relationships with other boys. I always said I was born gay but deep down inside I knew that my experiences as a boy were the cause. I still live a gay lifestyle but I know it’s wrong. It’s like a drug. You know it’s wrong, but you keep doing it.

From Adam: My Little League baseball coach molested me when I was 5. I blocked it out of my memory for years but it came rushing back to me one day in my twenties when I was in a car wreck. The trauma somehow pushed it back into my conscious memory. I am gay and always thought it was in my genes, but now I realize differently. I have considered going to counseling but it’s probably too late for me. It’s not too late for me to warn others though.

From Allan: My mother was a prostitute and drug addict. She had sex with other men in front of us kids all the time. Some of the men took advantage of us after taking advantage of her. I have been a part of the gay community since age 14 but I know I was not born this way.

From Anna: I was a foster child. I was molested many times by 3 different foster fathers. I chose to be lesbian because I do not feel comfortable with men in sexual situations.

From Amos: I was in love with a beautiful girl in high school. We started dating. I wanted to have sex. She did not. One night, with some high school friends, I got drunk. I think someone put something in my drink because I passed out. When I woke up, my best friend was giving me oral sex. It scared me because it felt wrong but felt good at the same time. The sex part felt good, but the fact that he was a guy felt wrong. I pushed him away and got dressed. I stomped out of the house. But one night at another party, I was drunk and he showed up. Next thing I knew I was in his car with him and not refusing his advances. I live a gay lifestyle now but I know that if that had never happened, I would probably be married with kids and living a normal life. I would be happy. I am not happy in this lifestyle. I don’t know how to explain why I don’t leave it but I am not happy.

From Andrew: I had no friends in high school. Some other students started being really nice to me. I felt like I finally had friends. They gave me a lot of attention and made me feel like I was part of something. It felt great. They were all part of the Gay Straight Alliance (GSA). They invited me to go with them. At first, I was there as a straight guy to give support to gays and fight against bullying (I had been through my fair share). But then we started socializing outside school. One day, at a party, I was high on drugs, and next thing I knew there was an orgy, and I was lured into it. Afterward, I felt sick. I skipped school for a week but then my parents found out. When I got back to school my friends were really nice and acted as if nothing had happened. It was surreal. Long story short, I ended up in a lot of gay relationships over the years but I know that if I had not had that first relationship, I would not be gay today. What’s weird is I can’t just switch back to the me I was before. I don’t know why but I know I was not born gay. I tell all younger friends to stay away from drugs and alcohol because you do things you normally would not do when you are under the influence and you are sometimes too weak to say no to things you know are wrong.

From Alice: My college roommate lured me into a gay relationship. The sex can feel good but you just know there’s something wrong. I definitely was not born gay.

It is our hope that many gays will stand up and tell the truth by forming small community groups to fight against the gay political agenda. Let your friends call you a traitor. You know better. We mustn’t have a central leader or that leader will be bullied into backing down. Like the Tea Party, we will be leaderless but powerful. We must help young people avoid what we fell into. Join with your straight fiends and make a difference.

Save the date:

12-12-12

@

12:00

On December 12, 2012, at 12 midnight, straight people and gay people who are against the gay political agenda, must walk outside with a candle, lighter, or flashlight and raise it in the air to show our solidarity. Let it shine upward into the sky. If you live in a cold climate, dress warmly. Stay for at least 30 minutes and let shine your courage, your determination, your knowledge that gay people are mostly victims, and we know we are being used to further an agenda.

He says that while he “cannot vouch for its authenticity,” the stories in it “ring true” — by which he means that they say what he wants them to say, of course. But seriously, Peter. Did you notice that the name spells out GAGA? Did you notice that all of the names of the people start with the letter A, and include Adam, Amos and Andrew? There are some serious hints here that this is a hoax. Whether the hoax was done by him or to him, I don’t know. But skepticism is certainly warranted here.

Comments

  1. regexp says

    I saw this a few days ago and my immediate reaction was that LaBarbera is being trolled. But really – how hard is that really to do?

  2. says

    I figured it was a hoax with the GAGA and everyone having an A name.

    Also, there’s the bit where every single story looked like a variation on the exact gay agenda filled with actively recruiting homosexuals story the anti-gay crusaders tell each other didn’t help. Basically, it looks like a Poe-ish variation on the Satanic panic meme that waxes and wanes in popularity.

  3. Captain Mike says

    I was molested by a young woman when I was 11.

    Damn it, if that hadn’t happened, I’d probably be gay now!

  4. valhar2000 says

    You’d be hard-pressed to lure me into a “gay relationship”. In other words, those stories don’t “ring true”.

  5. Big Boppa says

    Did you notice that all of the names of the people start with the letter A, and include Adam, Amos and Andrew?

    That’s because this is only half of the document. There were also testimonials from Gary, Garth, Greta and Gabriel.

  6. eric says

    Hoax, or some minister at a ‘gay conversion therapy’ center made his inmates write letters, then gave them pseudonyms.

  7. AsqJames says

    When I was 18 I had a drunken (and stoned) gay fumble with one of my former teachers when I went back to my old school for an “Old Boys” weekend. If it hadn’t been for that experience I may never have decided I was definitely straight.

  8. greg1466 says

    They should be careful with the shining lights into the night sky on 12/12/12. They might inadvertently catch the attention of the aliens. Hey. Maybe that’s what the Rapture really is. I’ll guess we’ll know if we find a bunch of candles and flashlights lying around come morning.

  9. says

    Even if we assume the letter-writers (a) exist and (b) are sincere, it does not alter the fact that the “gay agenda” in the US, such as it is, is to ensure that GLBTQ people are accorded the same legal privileges, etc, that heteronormative people have, even though by rights they ought to simply by being citizens of the US.

  10. jakc says

    It’s well known that “a” is the gayest letter. Look at Andrew Sullivan, and ummm … umm … Anne Heche and ummm …. lots of other gay people with “A” names.

  11. Captain Mike says

    I wouldn’t focus too much on the names. The letter mentions that the names have been changed.

  12. lofgren says

    Hoax or not, I kind of wish that gay activists would drop the “born this way” talking point. First because I wouldn’t be surprised if different people do come to have same sex attraction in different ways. Human sexuality is damn complicated, after all. But primarily because it shouldn’t matter. Whether you chose to be gay, or if your experiences taught you that it is enjoyable, or if you were born that way, or even you identify as straight but just like a good same-sex romp sometimes just isn’t relevant to the fact that nobody should be discriminated against for it. I’m a straight guy right now, but hey you never know what I might want to try someday in the future. Sexuality is not a valid basis to discriminate against other people.

    Whether or not gay people are “born” or “made” or “chosen” seems to me like an extremely complex scientific question that is worthy of investigation by biologists, neurologists, anthropologists, sociologists, biochemists, and probably several other relevant fields that I am neglecting. Politically, it’s just not relevant.

  13. inerrant says

    Hoaxer: The following bullshit is true except that I changed the names.
    Skeptics: Wait a minute. The names are obviously made up. This must be fake!

  14. jayhawk says

    Lofgren

    While I agree it should not matter and it is an interesting and complicated subject, I think if it was substantiated that sexual orientation was totally chosen (which it is not), then protecting people from discrimination under the law would be more difficult because you are talking about something that is controllable.

    Civil rights in general are about things that you cannot control, race, color, impairments, ethnicity, even religion is technically not a choice, but based on what you believe.

    I think author(s) of this letter have little understanding of what it means to be homosexual.

  15. matty1 says

    The way I always put it is. If being gay is a choice then discriminating against gay people is morally the same as discriminating against Christians. After all no one denies that is a choice right?

  16. matty1 says

    even religion is technically not a choice, but based on what you believe.

    I can’t think of anything that is a ‘purer’ choice than the decision to believe or not what someone tells you. If our opinions are not chosen then there is no reason to believe any aspect of our lives is. Which is a perfectly defensible philosophical position but it does rather undermine the idea that there is some special category of unchosen things that deserves different treatment.

  17. jnorris says

    Now who in the hell with anything like a half functioning brain is going to light a damn candle at midnight just 9 days before the end of the world?

  18. lofgren says

    then protecting people from discrimination under the law would be more difficult because you are talking about something that is controllable.

    I disagree. Are gay people, as a class, discriminated against? Yes. Is that unfair? Yes. Even if they could change, why should they? The burden is still on the bigot to show why discriminating against gay people is justifiable.

    Civil rights in general are about things that you cannot control, race, color, impairments, ethnicity, even religion is technically not a choice, but based on what you believe.

    And homosexuality is who you are attracted to.

    Even the hardcore bigots have mostly given up on the notion that a person can choose whom they are attracted to, and not even the gayest gay would deny that sex acts with a person of your gender are a choice over which they have control. Look at the examples above again: these poor victims did not and do not choose to have homosexual urges. Those urges were inflicted upon them. That’s the overriding narrative. And it has a lot more in common with “what you believe” than “what pants you put on this morning.”

    And that’s without getting into a discussion over whether religion is really about belief or tribal identification.

    And I still don’t think it matters. Perhaps a legal scholar can tell us where it is written that people are not due protection against unfair and unjust discrimination based on personal choices that harm no one.

  19. Sastra says

    jayhawk #19 wrote:

    Civil rights in general are about things that you cannot control, race, color, impairments, ethnicity, even religion is technically not a choice, but based on what you believe.

    No, I agree with those who point out that whether something is a “choice” or not is less significant than whether or not something is inherently harmful. The reason race, color, ethnicity etc. are singled out is that it was traditionally assumed that there was an essential nature which automatically defined the character and abilities of anybody in those categories. Traits and tendencies run in the “blood” and human beings are like breeds of dogs.

    Since this is not true, such beliefs can result in unfair discrimination.

    So “religion” belongs in that category only as long as people believe that one’s faith is a mark of inherent identity, separating one essential type of person from another. Atheists don’t see it that way: religious beliefs are rational conclusions (and they’re wrong.) The religious go back and forth between agreeing that’s it’s a rational conclusion (but it’s right!) and — when they start losing that one — that religion is instead some sort of Magic Essence.

  20. martinc says

    Looks Poe-ish to me, though given that the names were admitted to be changed, it’s possible the fact that they start with the letter A simply means they were picked off an alphabetical list, so I’d dismiss that as supporting evidence of fakery. I do like that typo toward the end though:

    “Join with your straight fiends”

    Hmm, “straight fiends”. Does Hell have gay fiends as well?

Leave a Reply