British ‘Psychic’ Goes All Peter Popoff


A British “psychic” named Anne Germain has apparently been caught doing what faith-healing fraud Peter Popoff did when James Randi caught him in the mid-80s, using questionnaires and an in-ear receiver to give her information about the people in the audience she was conning. Citing a Spanish newspaper report, the Daily Mirror says:

It says it has seen copies of briefs prepared for Mrs Germain and allegedly handed to her before she met members of the crowd at her £60-a-ticket packed live shows and on her TV series.

In one encounter, it is claimed “spiritual medium” Mrs Germain had a dossier saying one audience member had worked at the family’s pottery business.

A section headed “deceased loved ones”, informed Mrs Germain of the name and age of the person’s relative as well as how they died.

In the subsequent show, the medium claimed to be communicating with the deceased and told the person: “She is showing different pots, plates and glasses.”

Mrs Germain, who uses a translator at her shows in Spain, confirmed to The People this week that dossiers had been prepared for her ahead of her events.

Popoff’s version of this was to have people coming to his faith-healing services fill out prayer request cards, which he then had his wife read to him through a receiver in his ear that the audience could not see.

Comments

  1. Reginald Selkirk says

    In the subsequent show, the medium claimed to be communicating with the deceased and told the person: “She is showing different pots, plates and glasses.”

    They have dishes in Heaven?

  2. John Hinkle says

    Sixty quid per ticket!? That’s some good coin. I would get in on this racket, if it weren’t for that meddlin’ conscience.

  3. MikeMa says

    Really a combination: fraud by the charlatan and willful stupidity by the audience. A perfect match. People who write down prayer cards and then don’t recognize that crap spit back at them should be too stupid to remember to chew let alone reproduce.

  4. dogmeat says

    Sixty quid per ticket!? That’s some good coin. I would get in on this racket, if it weren’t for that meddlin’ conscience.

    Not to mention those meddling kids and their pesky dog!

  5. blf says

    A different British fraudster, possibly also doing a Popoff, with an insight into how much these scammers can earn, Why won’t psychic Sally Morgan accept our invitation to test her powers?:

    Last October, Simon Singh, the Merseyside Skeptics and [Chris French (the article’s author)] issued a challenge to alleged psychic Sally Morgan to take a test that would enable her to prove that she really does have psychic powers. This was after concerns had been raised that Sally might have used a hidden earpiece during her stageshow through which she was fed information about members of the audience, giving the impression that she was obtaining this information by psychic means.

    Sally didn’t provide reasons for not taking part this year [when challenged again], but last year her lawyer Graham Atkins told Simon Singh: “You well know that we all have far more important things to do than take part in this or any other ‘test’ at this point.” Given that proof of Sally’s ability not only to talk to dead people but also to receive accurate replies would constitute the most amazing scientific breakthrough of this or any other century, it is hard to imagine what these “far more important things” might be …

    …[O]n average she [is estimated to make] £25,000 per show — just short of £26,000, which is the average annual income of households in the UK.

    The bottom line is that if Sally tours for, say, 10 months of the year, she is almost certainly making at least £5m per annum, just from her stage shows. If you were her, would you agree to take part in a test that you’d almost certainly fail unless you had genuine psychic powers — and that would only reward you with a paltry million dollars even if you managed somehow to pass it?

    The “million dollars” is a reference to JREF’s prize.

  6. =8)-DX says

    I don’t see what’s wrong. It’s all a show, everyone knows it, don’t they? She knows it, her staff know it, the public knows it, her audience surely… oh. Darn. I think she should’ve put up a disclaimer.

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