The Taliban’s Disgusting Rationalizations


As I’m sure you’ve all heard by now, the Pakistani Taliban tried to murder a 14 year old girl because she advocated education for women. But now those barbaric thugs have released a statement saying that they didn’t try to kill her for that reason, but because she promoted secularism and was a symbol of an anti-Sharia movement. Because that’s so much better.

The letter, written in English, says a Taliban gunman “successfully targeted” Yousafzai “although she was young and a girl and the TTP does not believe in attacking women.” It says Yousafzai, who gained global recognition at the age of 11 through an online diary she wrote for the BBC about TTP influence in her hometown of Mingora, was shot because “whom so ever leads a campaign against Islam and Shariah is ordered to be killed by Shariah.”

The letter accuses Yousafzai of being “pro-West,” promoting Western culture, and speaking out against Taliban militants — charging that Yousafzai’s “personality became a symbol of an anti-Shariah campaign.” Using the term for Islamic holy warriors to refer to Taliban militants, the letter says that “Yousafzai was playing a vital role in bucking up the emotions” of Pakistan’s military and government “and was inviting Muslims to hate mujahideen.”

The letter goes on to argue that “[i]t is a clear command of Shariah that any female who, by any means, plays a role in the war against mujahideen should be killed.” It then seeks to justify the shooting of the schoolgirl by citing passages from the Koran in which a child or woman was killed…

The Taliban’s justification concludes with a threat, saying: “If anyone thinks that Malala is targeted because of education, that’s absolutely wrong and is propaganda by media. Malala is targeted because of her pioneer role in preaching secularism and so-called enlightened moderation. And whom so ever will commit so in the future too will be targeted again by the TTP.”

Fucking murderous barbarians.

Comments

  1. Michael Heath says

    My morning newspaper reported some rallies in Pakistan where were both in support of Miss Yousafzai and to condemn the Taliban for their behavior.

  2. Dennis N says

    My morning newspaper reported some rallies in Pakistan where were both in support of Miss Yousafzai and to condemn the Taliban for their behavior.

    Commendable, both to the rally-goers and to your paper for printing it.

  3. says

    the TTP does not believe in attacking women

    I don’t believe them.

    They’re certainly big, tough guys to shoot an unarmed 14 year-old girl. Their faith must be very very mighty indeed.

  4. dingojack says

    My advice to these so-called ‘mujahideen’* is this:
    targeting a child has simply shown the Pakistani people (and the world) the calibre of your ‘pistols’, and they ain’t quaking in their boots.
    I’d stay out of (reasonably) civilised areas, lest the crowd tear you limb from limb.
    Dingo
    —–
    * These ‘heroic warriors’ who are so terrified of a little girl they had to shoot her, and other little girls, to make themselves feel like men.
    Murderous barbarians? That’s an insult to murderous barbarbians – these are just common garden-variety scared, runty little mysoginist scumbags.

  5. says

    Shit, that makes it all better. When they shot her being an outspoken girl, I thought that they were cowardly sexist barbaric assholes. But now that I know that the shot her for simply being outspoken, it makes everything better. They’re only cowardly barbaric assholes. Wait, no that doesn’t make anything better.

    Gender equality, you’re doing it wrong.

  6. Sastra says

    I think that the Taliban believes that religious people around the world, whatever religion they believe in, agree that ‘secularism’ is dangerous and is something that ought to be fought against strenuously. If they can only explain that this is why they did what they did, then they hope global opinion will shift from disapproval to, if not approval, then at least sympathy. Most people are religious. Therefore, they reason, most people will accept the motivation as valid — simply be worried about whether the Taliban went a little too far or not.

    They appeal then to allowing a culture and community to defend their own definition of how far, is far enough.

    It’s actually not a bad strategy, given that most religious people around the world DO agree that “secularism” is an enemy to religion — depending on what you mean by that. And there’s the rub. The Taliban, like most extremists, fail to get the vital importance of definitions and distinctions and what are after all NOT fine points of difference on how you approach a problem: do you express moral outrage or do you shoot someone in the head? The Muslim fundies have allowed the little bubble of harmonious theological agreement which surrounds and isolates them from the wider culture them to color their perception of how other religious people think in those cultures. They think there is a confluence of purpose, and only minor disagreements on strategy.

    And they are, for the most part, wrong.

  7. tmscott says

    When you resort to violence or intimidation, you have as much as admitted the failure of your argument, whatever it is.

    TMS

  8. DaveL says

    I don’t know how they could make it much clearer that being against educating girls, against secularism, in favour of Sharia, in favour of the Taliban, and in favour of shooting teenage girls are all part of the same big bundle.

  9. steve84 says

    @Sastra
    Most religions fully agree with them. The Vatican’s official position is that secularism is the greatest threat to mankind. The Pope has compared secularism to Nazism.

    It’s just that Islam is a couple hundred years younger and never went through a reform process like Christianity did. But until the 18th century, Christians (both Catholics and Protestants alike) also killed non-believers and anyone who opposed them.

  10. says

    I think that the Taliban believes that religious people around the world, whatever religion they believe in, agree that ‘secularism’ is dangerous and is something that ought to be fought against strenuously.

    Gee, I wonder where they got that idea…

    Ed: Speaking of such matters, I’m trying to find some information about some sort of joint statement or proclamation promising interfaith cooperation against atheism worldwide. I believe you wrote about it at least once, and mentioned that Bush Jr. and the king of Saudi Arabia has signed onto it. Can you point to either your past posts on this, or to some other source? Thanks in advance.

  11. matty1 says

    There have been numerous attempts to reform Islam unfortunately they tend to either die out or be as repressive as what they challenge.

  12. grumpyoldfart says

    I think both reasons are bullshit. The shooters are control freaks. They kill people because it makes them feel important. They enjoy having the power to decide who lives and who dies. It puts them right up there with god himself.

    Sure they give reasons to the press but (as this story makes clear) if the press doesn’t accept the reasons, the Taliban just sit down and make up some more.

    Reason means nothing to the Taliban. Having the power to kill people for trivial reasons – that’s what gives them a hard-on.

  13. typecaster says

    I don’t know if I’m the only one, but when I saw TTP (undoubtedly the acronym for the real official name of their organization), I read it as “Taliban Tea Party”.

    In fairness, our home-grown Tea Party isn’t anywhere near this extreme, yet. But it worries me that I think the folks on that political fringe could, in time, get there. I keep thinking about the guy who walked into a Unitarian church and shot up a children’s stage play.

  14. jnorris says

    Marcus Ranum says:

    They’re certainly big, tough guys to shoot an unarmed 14 year-old girl. Their faith must be very very mighty indeed.

    Marcus, I believe their faith is piddling small. Allah allowed the school girl to live. The Taliban is not the Sword of Allah anymore.

  15. billgascoyne says

    It’s just that Islam is a couple hundred years younger and never went through a reform process like Christianity did. But until the 18th century, Christians (both Catholics and Protestants alike) also killed non-believers and anyone who opposed them.

    Unfortunately, those couple of centuries are also the difference between pitchforks and flintlocks vs. AK47s, RPGs, and nukes. Do you really think they’ll go “through a reform process like Christianity did” before they kill millions or billions of “non-believers and anyone who oppose[s] them”?

  16. iangould says

    “I think that the Taliban believes that religious people around the world, whatever religion they believe in, agree that ‘secularism’ is dangerous and is something that ought to be fought against strenuously. If they can only explain that this is why they did what they did, then they hope global opinion will shift from disapproval to, if not approval, then at least sympathy. Most people are religious. Therefore, they reason, most people will accept the motivation as valid — simply be worried about whether the Taliban went a little too far or not. ”

    Bingo.

    Hence too the offers to kill anyone desecrating the Bible or insulting Jesus.

  17. iangould says

    “Most religions fully agree with them. The Vatican’s official position is that secularism is the greatest threat to mankind. The Pope has compared secularism to Nazism.

    It’s just that Islam is a couple hundred years younger and never went through a reform process like Christianity did. But until the 18th century, Christians (both Catholics and Protestants alike) also killed non-believers and anyone who opposed them.”

    I keep hearing this claim and i’m sorry but its simply incorrect.

    There have been multiple reformist movements within Islam. Fro that matter, the dominant Islamic school of thoguht durign the Abasid Caliphate was highly rationist and deneid the inerrancy of the Qu’ran.

    There’s also the Alevi and Muhammediya movemments and various Sufi groups as well as various schools of Adat Islam as practised in Indonesia.

    Adat Islam is the school of thoguht that produced the late Abdulrahman wahid – President of Indfonesia and leader of the world’s largest muslim organzition – who maintained that “sharia” required total freedom of religion (and not just for “Peopel of the book”) and equality of the sexes

    It’s not that “Islam never had a reformation”, rather it’s that for the past couple of hundred years the Islamic counterreformation has been winning.

    A key reason for that is Euopean colonialism. The failure of Muslim states to resist European aggression led many people to conclude that they needed a moral and religious revival and a return to the fundamentals of their faith.

    There’s a famous quote from a 19th century Indoesnian Santri activist: “I do not wear the Hijab because my mother did. I wear it because she did not.”

    The Santri are a fascinating case study in how wrong westerners get Islam and Islamic history: the Santri were for science, democracy, equal rights for women – and a strict adherence to the tenets of orthodox sunni islam as they interpreted them.

    (Muslim Javanese women before colonialism had more rights than women anywhere else on the planet. They owned proeprty in their own right, had equal rights in divorce, traveled freely etc. As far as the Santri were concerned the decline in the position of women during the Dutch colonial period was due to a weakening of “Islamic values”.)

  18. Chiroptera says

    iangould, #19: A key reason for that is Euopean colonialism.

    I was about to say, pro-Western liberal reformers could have been the dominant political force in the Middle Eastern areas when the Ottoman Empire broke up after WWI. Unfortunately, they lost most of their credibility when the victorious allies broke their promises of independence for these areas and promptly made them Mandates (that is, colonies under a newer name).

    The one place where the reformers did gain power was Turkey itself, which maintained its independence.

  19. iangould says

    Yes, let’s hear it for that wonderful teansformation that Christianity has gone through.

    The Lord’s Resistance Army is just a statistical outlier.

    Like the Christian mobs in Cote d’Ivoire who burnt down 2,000 mosques and murdered hundreds of Imams during the civil war there.

    And the hundreds of Rwandan Catholic clergy who took an active part in the genocide and justified it in explicitly religious terms.

    And the Serb militias who flew icons of the Virgin Mary from their tansk when they roleld into Srebrenica.

    And the British skinheads who wear St George’s cross insignia while attacking Muslims.

    I keep saying this because people not getting the message: a vanishing small percentage of Muslism support vioence against other religious groups, an approximately equivalent percentage of every other major religion do the same.

    But westerners who live in an obverwhelmingly Christian society, who see the great majority of peaceful law-abiding Christians every day, recognize that violent Christian extremists are a small minority.

    But Islam, especially sicne 9-11, is ivrtually never covered in the western media EXCEPT in terms of religous violence. Quick when was the last time you saw a story, any story, from a Muslim country that wasn’t about religious extremism or didn’t feel the need to insert references to religious extremism?

  20. andrewlephong says

    “If anyone thinks that Malala is targeted because of education, that’s absolutely wrong and is propaganda by media. Malala is targeted because of her pioneer role in preaching secularism and so-called enlightened moderation.”

    Really, it’s the same thing. The former (education) has a very strong tendency to lead to the latter (secularism and enlightened moderation).

  21. StevoR says

    Taslima Nasreen’s post “Malala and Taliban” of October 14, 2012 at 12:42 am and the cartoon there says it all really.

    (I’d link to it but I can’t seem to do that here – past attempts to do so on this blog have resulted in my comment vanishing without trace.)

    Malala has been flown to the UK for treatment, and the whole world has noticed again that the taliban are dishonourable gutless cowards so terrified and worthless inside that they tried to murder a schoolgirl – three schoolgirls actually – for merely wanting to learn.

    How powerful an educated woman must be that causes Islam and the bearded, nasty, frightened, violent, murderous men with AK-47′s to try to kill them?

    Fucking murderous barbarians.

    Yes the taliban certainly are *exactly* that.

    We should have no respect for them or their child raping, murdering hallucinating or/ & lying long dead dark age “prophet” and his overgrown death cult. We should not let these fucking murderous barbarians intimidate us into silence or bully us into giving them any quarter.

    We shouldn’t care what they think and should unapologetically and unhesitatingly and vigourously fight the threat they pose to the rest of Humanity.

  22. dingojack says

    Stevo – no matter how much you keep saying it, it don’t make any more true.
    Dingo
    —–
    PS: [sorry if this is ‘teaching you how to suck eggs’]
    try this:
    [a href=”insert hhtp here by CnP”]text that hides the link[/a]
    (but replace brackets with ‘less-than’ and ‘greater-than’ signs).

    like this:
    < a href=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taliban”>Wiki on the taliban</a>

    which should appear like this:
    Wiki on the taliban.

    Only two links are permitted per post, otherwise it’ll go into moderation.

    Hope that helps.

  23. iangould says

    Shorter SteveR, let’s exterminate the subhuman Muslim scum in the name of freedom and tolerance.

    Go read back issues of Der Sturmer and you’ll find almost exact, word-for-word identical statements about the Jews.

  24. iangould says

    O,h by the way, Malala is one of those mindless members of that barbaric death cult you want to exterminate.

    But I’m sure a few years in a re-education camp will fix that right up.

  25. seivadthe says

    @iangould
    Re: Santri, don’t you mean Abangan? Santri is the more orthradox muslim stream that follows sharia. Where as Abangan pratice adat, and contain ethnic groups like the Minangkabau who are a matrilinial society (still), and mixes Hindi, Buddhist and other indigneos traditions.
    Adat is still important regionaly in Indonesia, but it was never praticed by the majority of Janvanese people, who in turn are the majority in Indonesia.
    But yes, an interesting culture and history, one of many examples of syncretic Islamic cultures, and has a long history of being challenged by more orthradox muslims (see the padri war).

Trackbacks

  1. […] was busy dropping a man from space and finding new worlds, religion was busy praying for change and shooting a 14 year-old girl in the head for wanting equality.Here’s to a humanity that recognizes the best of us. /* Filed Under: […]

Leave a Reply