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Oct 07 2012

Rush, Deep Purple Finally Nominated for Rock Hall of Fame

In news that should have happened a decade and a half ago, Rush and Deep Purple have finally been nominated for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Whether they make the final list of inductees remains to be seen. The fact that neither band was even nominated before is simply ridiculous.

The list of people and bands nominated is actually quite deep: Albert King, Chic, Deep Purple, Donna Summer, Heart, Joan Jett and the Blackhearts, Kraftwerk, the Marvelettes, the Meters, N.W.A., Paul Butterfield Blues Band, Procol Harum, Public Enemy, Randy Newman and Rush.

I voted at the link above, where I could pick my top 5 and I chose Rush, Deep Purple, Heart (another one that should have been in long ago), Joan Jett and Randy Newman. But I’d definitely vote for Albert King, the Meters, N.W.A. and Public Enemy as well. Yes, I know those last two are rap groups, but the hall has started admitting hip hop artists and those two certainly stand out as the most revolutionary and influential.

Someone on my Facebook page wondered, if Deep Purple is finally inducted, would Glenn Hughes and David Coverdale be included? Good question. I think it’s up to the band’s current lineup to decide which former members are invited, but I could be wrong. The current lineup has three members of the classic lineup: Ian Gillen, Roger Glover and Ian Paice. Jon Lord recently passed away. I imagine the band will invite Ritchie Blackmore to be there, and I really hope he is, but I wouldn’t be at all surprised if he blew it off and didn’t show up. These days, he’s left rock and roll behind for folk music with his wife. Steve Morse, the current guitarist, would almost certainly be there as well.

But there are whole bunch of former members that might be invited, including Joe Satriani, who played in the band for a couple years in the 90s, Tommy Bolin, Joe Lynn Turner (also the singer for Rainbow for a time) and several others you’ve probably never heard of. But I don’t think the Hall invites everyone who was ever in the band, I think they invite the current band and they get to decide who else to invite. The Red Hot Chili Peppers included two drummers who were in the band before they ever put out an album, and even had them playing with them onstage.

Rush, of course, wouldn’t have those kinds of problems. They’ve had the same lineup for 38 years now and the only former member was the original drummer, Jon Rutsey, and he died a few years ago. But man, how overdue is that nomination? By what possible criteria do they not deserve to be there? They are phenomenal musicians who have influenced practically every rock band of the last few decades, they’ve got classic songs and albums, they continue to sell out arenas all over the world. Even if you don’t like the band, you have to admit they should be in hall (I feel the same way about KISS, a band that bores the hell out of me but certainly should be there).

Heart and Joan Jett absolutely belong there as well. And Albert King should join the long list of great blues guitarists and finally be inducted. I also went with Randy Newman because I think he’s such a great songwriter and such a brilliant wit.

51 comments

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  1. 1
    Michael Heath

    I’ll put my nominees forward after this post. But I gotta ask, how does Joan Jett and the Blackhearts deserve even a nomination, let alone induction? Did they make even one decent album? I love her one hit, the obvious though fun anthem, I love Rock and Roll. But if she gets in for that song alone then Norman Greenbaum requires induction for the far better (IMO) fuzzy guitar song Spirit in the Sky. The follow-up single was a cover, Crimson and Clover which was equal to what any decent bar band could do, the rest of the album was again IMO forgettable where I don’t think I was the only one thinking that since I don’t recall any of her songs getting airplay on rock radio besides the aforementioned original hit.

  2. 2
    Didaktylos

    Tommy Bolin might have a wee bit of trouble attending …

  3. 3
    Michael Heath

    Follow-on the prior post. Procul Harem for Whiter Shade of Pale deserves induction way before Joan Jett and the Blackhearts; so I don’t even need to bring up Norman Greenbaum.

    My five:

    1) Rush (no-brainer)

    2) Heart (no-brainer)

    3) Donna Summer – I was never into disco much except for liking K.C. and the Sunshine Band, but she was a major talent that can’t be denied. I did love I feel love and Love to love ya’ baby as only a sixteen – eighteen year-old boy could.

    4) Deep Purple – I respect arguments that put them #1 or #2, I drop them down because they’re music doesn’t hold-up as well with age as Rush and Heart’s music does. That’s not just my opinion, but what I also observe when listening to several rock radio formats. But as a twelve-year old in 1972 when they broke-out with Smoke on the Water, I note they influenced a lot of kids my age to become rock musicians; just like the Beatles did when they performed on Ed Sullivan.

    5) Albert King – I don’t know the level of Kraftwerk’s influence well enough to know if they deserve induction before King. I suspect an argument could be made they deserve it more.

  4. 4
    cry4turtles

    Don’t forget “Bad Reputation”. The album “Rock n Roll” is on is actually a good album (from memory). I think she’s had more influence on female punk performers than you give her credit for Micheal. IMHO. Plus she’s still out there rockin’ it with the other veterans of classic rock, and holding her own.

  5. 5
    beezlebubby

    Still no ELO or Jeff Lynne. Pffft.
    Good on RUSH, though. I’m not even a fan of theirs but I like the nomination, signalling the end of at least one glaring HOF oversight/snubbing.

  6. 6
    Olav

    Honest question: why even care?

    Please don’t misunderstand, among other music that I like I also like rock music, especially from the seventies but also from later years. But the importance of this “Hall of Fame” escapes me. Isn’t it just another way of commercialising art? In other words, for someone to make money off other people’s music?

    Another honest question: when we are discussing favourites, why isn’t Rory Gallagher on anyone’s list?

    Video: A Million Miles Away

  7. 7
    Michael Heath

    cry4turtles:

    Don’t forget “Bad Reputation”. The album “Rock n Roll” is on is actually a good album (from memory). I think she’s had more influence on female punk performers than you give her credit for Micheal. IMHO. Plus she’s still out there rockin’ it with the other veterans of classic rock, and holding her own.

    If Bad Reputation is supposedly so good, how come it’s gets virtually no airplay on classic rock formats, especially AOR formats that go deep? Besides of course the song of the same name and I love Rock and Roll, which gets occasional play.

    The fact she continues to perform is the most popular defense I’ve encountered. However lots of bands are out there working it for years, so what? How does that distinguish her enough to deserve the Hall of Fame?

  8. 8
    addiepray

    Rush better make the cut- I agree with you their exclusion is absurd. I’d also like to see Jethro Tull make the cut someday- definitely not as big or as obvious as Rush, but they were a great band with an unmistakable sound. And they also have an equally rabid hater-base.

  9. 9
    Michael Heath

    beezlebubby writes:

    Good on RUSH, though. I’m not even a fan of theirs but I like the nomination, signalling the end of at least one glaring HOF oversight/snubbing.

    I’m not a big fan of prog rock though I have a lot of Rush music, I just never really took to it since I’m more of fan of blues-based rock that’s more about feelings than virtuosity. I always thought I should love them which is why I bought a lot of their music without actually loving them. There are some exceptions, I love the album Moving Pictures; but for the most part the LPs collect dust and CDs I imported into iTunes don’t get many plays compared to say, the Rolling Stones, or most of what Page and/or Plant did, or blues artists like Solomon Burke.

    But in spite of a difference in taste, I can appreciate what an enormously talented set of musicians Rush is, especially their drummer. Both in their recorded and live performances along with a lot of great material. The latter being the criteria I think normally applies to the truly great ones – creating, arranging, and performing great material. Exceptions of course exist, Jimi Hendrix’s cover of Bob Dylan’s All Along the Watchtower being a great example though his arrangement and performance greatly exceeded the original which even Dylan concedes – so even there great creativity was key. And while Rush’s earliest stuff is dated the point it doesn’t get much airplay, they’re stuff from at least the early-’80s if not back to ’78′s Hemispheres still sounds relevant.

  10. 10
    Nemo

    Voting open to fans for the first time

    Sounds great. But wait –

    Pick up to five acts – the top five vote-getters will comprise a “fan’s ballot” that will count as one of the more than 600 ballots that determine the Class of 2013.

    1/600th

  11. 11
    thecalmone

    I couldn’t name a single Rush song. I’m astonished Kraftwerk have never been nominated, however. They have heavily influenced – if not actually created – several genres of music.

  12. 12
    timgueguen

    Add me to the list of people that think a music hall of fame is a silly idea, The only truly objective criteria for music is overall sales, the rest is subjective. The Bay City Rollers probably sold more than the Velvet Underground, but had little lasting influence on the artists that followed, while a common quip is that everyone who bought the first VU album started a band.

    Kraftwerk were highly influential. But even before that there was Hot Butter’s 1972 cover of Gershon Kingsley’s “Popcorn,” which was a smash hit and a prototype for so much of the synth pop that followed. Somehow I doubt either Hot Butter or Kingsley will get in the Hall of Fame despite that major influence, because they were a one hit wonder. But what a hit!

  13. 13
    Michael Heath

    Olav writes:

    Honest question: why even care?

    Please don’t misunderstand, among other music that I like I also like rock music, especially from the seventies but also from later years. But the importance of this “Hall of Fame” escapes me. Isn’t it just another way of commercialising art? In other words, for someone to make money off other people’s music?

    Another honest question: when we are discussing favourites, why isn’t Rory Gallagher on anyone’s list?

    Well if done right, it becomes one way to insure future generations are exposed to those we think are great. So you kinda rebut your point by bringing up Rory Gallagher; for those inducted, their music has a better chance of being heard generations from now. Of course that process has to be competent where I readily agree he’s a deserving inductee and people are justified in being bent out of shape given the Hall’s ignoring Rush for far too long.

    And given the Hall provides inductions to people absurdly beyond what rock and roll is or came from while leaving out so many deserving others (especially some studio musicians), it’d be great to see a competing entity challenge them. One run by people who are actual fans of rock and roll.

  14. 14
    Ed Brayton

    I would have nominated Joan Jett on her own, for her work both with the Blackhearts as a solo artist and with the Runaways. I’d justify just in terms of influence. The Runaways were really the first all-female hard rock band and their story is pretty legendary. I think my criteria for the hall of fame is this: If you were to tell the story of rock and roll, would you need to include this artist? I think Joan Jett qualifies on that criteria. But there are obviously other standards one could use and it’s mostly subjective. But a band like Rush should be obvious even to non-fans. Another band that qualifies: KISS, a band I really have no use for and don’t like at all. But if you’re telling the story of rock music, you simply can’t leave them out.

  15. 15
    democommie

    No Albert Lee, Searchers,Dick Dale* and the Del-Tones, Nils Lofgren, Jan&
    Dean, 10cc, Burton Cummings/Guess Who, Freddy Fender, Robert Palmer, Robert Plant, The Groundhogs, Delbert McClinton, Suzi Quatro,. Any of the bands mentioned here are at least as deserving as Joan Jett, in one category or another.

    * An asshole, imo, but his guitar style is unique to its time period and influenced a lot of people.

  16. 16
    Bill Dauphin, avec fromage

    addiepray (@8):

    I’d also like to see Jethro Tull make the cut someday- definitely not as big or as obvious as Rush, but they were a great band with an unmistakable sound.

    Wait, what?? Obviously I don’t keep up with the R&RHoF or I would’ve already known this, but I’m shocked that Jethro Tull isn’t already in! You seriously put Rush ahead of them? I love Rush, but Tull is utterly seminal.

    timgueguen (@12):

    But even before that there was Hot Butter’s 1972 cover of Gershon Kingsley’s “Popcorn,” which was a smash hit and a prototype for so much of the synth pop that followed. Somehow I doubt either Hot Butter or Kingsley will get in the Hall of Fame despite that major influence, because they were a one hit wonder. But what a hit!

    Blast from the past! That album (which had a folded movie theatre popcorn container glued to the jacket) was one of the first records I ever bought, right after I got my first stereo, at age 12!

  17. 17
    wildbill

    I know I’ll get slammed, but I don’t think Rush belongs. Yes they are talented, but so are a lot of other groups that don’t get in. And I’ll give it to them, they made it in spite of their label (I always thought Mercury was a poor label, they never seemed to support their talent). I also don’t think Joan Jett deserves it. I liked some of here stuff, both solo and the runaways (though I haven’t listened to it in years, and I don’t know if it will hold up).

    I agree with the selections of Albert King (no question), Deep Purple (after Led Zeppelin, probably one of the next most important heavy metal bands of the time), Donna Summer (I’m not a big disco fan, but I understand her importance), Public Enemy (I’m not a big rap fan, but I understand their importance) and Kraftwerk. Maybe Randy Newman, I’m torn on that one.

    The ones I think are questionable, but maybe deserve it are: the Marvelettes, the meters, NWA, Procol Harum and Paul Butterfield. Some of these artists I haven’t heard as much, but I know their reputation. Others I like, and that could be swaying me a bit.

    But I’d say no to Rush, heart, Joan Jett and Chic (I almost wanted to put them in the maybe category, but couldn’t)

  18. 18
    dingojack

    Yes but, as ‘has-beens’, do they support (or not) Obama or Rmoney! That’s the burning question (obviously)!! @@
    Dingo
    —–
    The seventies, like the eighties, are ‘comfort music’, not great but we like to think so because of the memories attached for ‘our generation’*.
    Later generations will ask: ‘Joan Jett/Rush/Jethro Tull, who the hell were they?’
    * When was George Formby, Gracie Fields, Bing Crosby, The Inkspots, The Andrews Sisters and other favorites of our parent and/or grandparents inducted in any kind of ‘hall of fame’? And if they were how influential are they in the grand scheme of things?

  19. 19
    Larry

    democommie sez

    An asshole, imo, but his guitar style is unique to its time period and influenced a lot of people.

    I never heard that but, personalities aside, Dale is a seminal artist who introduced the surf guitar craze, thus establishing a major 50′s and 60′s genre which included The Beach Boys. To my mind, any one or group who establishes a major era of music is highly deserving of being a member of any hall of fame.

  20. 20
    Wes

    The exact criteria that the Hall uses to choose its inductees is opaque to me. Is it for “influence”? Then why are none of the bands from the most influential recent movement in rock music–the Seattle grunge scene–inducted? I mean, no Nirvana. No Pearl Jam. No Soundgarden. Really? It’s been over 20 years since the Seattle sound broke out, and pretty much all subsequent rock music was influenced by it to some extent, but no love from the HOF?

    Is it for defining a sub-genre? Then why are Slayer and Rage Against the Machine excluded? Is it for leading a movement? Then where are Judas Priest and Iron Maiden? Is it for being very unique and creative? Then why isn’t Tool or Primus inducted?

    In fact, I can’t help but notice that the “hard” forms of rock are not very well-represented among the inductees. They include hip hop and disco as “rock”, but the only thrash metal band inducted is Metallica, and there’s no rap metal (unless you count the Beastie Boys), no death metal, no grunge, no hard core punk, no progressive metal, no industrial metal, etc. This despite the fact that for the last 40 years rock has been steadily moving towards harder and heavier sounds. I mean, why induct bands like Black Sabbath, Led Zepplin, and Deep Purple, but then mostly ignore the enormous amount of hard rock and heavy metal that owes its existence to them?

    I just find it hard to believe that ABBA is a bigger rock presence than, say, Nirvana or Nine Inch Nails. (Hell, Captain Beefheart (also not inducted) probably had more influence in the grand scheme of things than ABBA.)

    And I hate glam metal, but can anyone deny that butt rock bands like Motley Crue were huge influences on rock music, for better or worse? And what about Yngwie Malmsteen? Are shredders not welcome in the Hall of Fame?

    Anyways, I agree that leaving Deep Purple and Rush out for so long was absurd, but I could make a long list of bands that have been absurdly left out, but the HOF’s sins go beyond leaving out certain individual performers. Entire genres of rock are mostly or entirely ignored by them.

  21. 21
    Ace of Sevens

    @Michael Heath: So Rush is your topp pick, but Joan Jett doesn’t get enough modern airplay? I must hear “I Hate Myself for Loving You” twice a night at work.

  22. 22
    Draken

    I find ‘Rock and Roll’ a term associated with a greasy hairstyle, fixed rhythms and instruments and empty lyrics- Bill Haley, the old Beatles, that sort of thing. I can’t bring myself to call Rush or Kraftwerk Rock ‘n’ Roll.

    But since progressive rock is allowed in the Rock and Roll hall of fame, I must nominate Mike Oldfield. I know, I’m the last man in the world to still listen to Ommadawn and Hergest Ridge. If you want to date me, you need argon dating.

  23. 23
    Joey Maloney

    They’ve had the same lineup for 38 years

    Fuck, we’re old.

  24. 24
    sanford

    No Albert Lee, Searchers,Dick Dale* and the Del-Tones, Nils Lofgren, Jan&
    Dean, 10cc, Burton Cummings/Guess Who, Freddy Fender, Robert Palmer, Robert Plant, The Groundhogs, Delbert McClinton, Suzi Quatro

    There are a couple of of these groups that I have never heard of. But did the Guess Who have a long and distinguished career? Same goes for Robert Palmer. I have to say I only know two of his songs. Suzi Quatro (leather tuscadero) please. While I am not a fan of Kiss, how are they not in the Rock and Hall of fame. That is like keeping Howard Stern out of the Radio Hall of Fame, regardless what you think about him. If I am correct I think he was to be inducted this year.

  25. 25
    basementmatt

    I’ve been reading political blogs for entirely too long. From the first three words I figured it was one of two things:

    1. Limbaugh caught dead with a prostitute; or
    2. Limbaugh complaining about Ohio.

  26. 26
    tacitus

    Honest question: why even care?

    Agreed. This seems to be a mostly American phenomenon (sports as well) — though I guess other nations have adopted the “Hall of Fame” thing too.

    Maybe they should start a politics “Hall of Fame” next, then we’d really see the sparks fly.

    The exact criteria that the Hall uses to choose its inductees is opaque to me.

    It’s a popularity contest, probably with a good deal of snobbery thrown in given that most people (and especially the voters in this “contest”) like to think they have a good taste in music. Clearly it’s more a marketing vehicle than anything else, and I suspect that, unlike sportsmen and women, the vast majority of musicians couldn’t care less unless they are actually invited to attend the ceremony.

  27. 27
    KDinUT

    The 2nd largest concert draw (after Led Zeppelin) in the mid-1970s and, it is said, who Deep Purple ceded to as the closing act at the 1974 California Jam because DP knew they’d get blown off the stage by them, the band that all but made “synthesizer” a household word, is sadly missing from the RRHOF: Emerson, Lake & Palmer. People either love them or hate them, but it doesn’t change the fact that ELP were HUGE at their peak.

  28. 28
    Doug Little

    The rock and Roll hall of fame isn’t, and never will be until freaking Iron Maiden and Motorhead are inducted. Kraftwerk, seriously???

  29. 29
    Ed Brayton

    Wes –

    No one is eligible to be in the hall of fame until 25 years after their first album. Nirvana will be eligible in a few years and they will undoubtedly be a first-ballot inductee. Pearl Jam probably will be too. Same is true of many of the other bands you mentioned.

    They’ve been very slow to recognize heavy metal acts, but that’s starting to change. They’ve now inducted Black Sabbath and Metallica, but Iron Maiden and Judas Priest should definitely be there.

  30. 30
    Michael Heath

    democommie writes:

    Burton Cummings/Guess Who

    That one blows me away, they were awesome and their songs sound as every bit as fresh now as then.

    Ed’s approach . . .

    KISS was a great illustration of your approach. I agree they should be in the Hall of Fame in spite of my thinking they’re gut-cringingly bad in every musical factor one can imagine – except marketing prowess. An opinion shared by none of the other guys I was hanging with in high school in the 70s when they were huge. Though in those guys’ defense I was and still am a Barry Manilow fan.

  31. 31
    Marcus Ranum

    Rock and Roll hall of fame is kind of a silly idea. There are more awesome rockers than there are inductees, and that’s not even dipping down into the slightly-less-than-awesome. Awesome is just too big a club, when it comes to rock and roll!

  32. 32
    williamgeorge

    As a Canadian I’m happy that our national band may finally be inducted.

    We’ll all forget about it in a week. But it’s nice to know that our lifestyle of jean jackets and swinging mullets as we air guitar to Closer To The Heart will finally earn some respect on the international stage.

  33. 33
    Michael Heath

    Draken writes:

    I find ‘Rock and Roll’ a term associated with a greasy hairstyle, fixed rhythms and instruments and empty lyrics- Bill Haley, the old Beatles, that sort of thing. I can’t bring myself to call Rush or Kraftwerk Rock ‘n’ Roll

    What style of music is Rush playing then? How about The Rolling Stones, Honky Tonk Women; what style is that?

  34. 34
    Michael Heath

    The Hall of Fame would be more fun if we were able to have a, “on second thought”, category; where certain members were expelled because they didn’t deserve to be there in the first place.

    My first nomination of a group where I was a big fan would be Van Halen; though I think Eddie Van Halen deserves induction for his guitar prowess.

  35. 35
    Michael Heath

    Second ‘kick them out’ would be Guns ‘n Roses. What was I thinking?

  36. 36
    democommie

    “There are a couple of of these groups that I have never heard of.”

    Then you might want to look them up and find some of their music before you dismiss them out of hand.

    “But did the Guess Who have a long and distinguished career?”.

    More distinguished than Ms. Jetts, imo. “American Woman”, “No Sugar Tonight”, “These Eyes”, “Laughing”, “Shakin’ All Over (cover), “Undun”, “These Eyes”, “No Time (Left For You)” are all in rotation on rock stations that play the music of the period.

    “Same goes for Robert Palmer. I have to say I only know two of his songs.’

    You’re listening to the wrong music, then. Robert Palmer was in the biz for over 35 years. He made a shitload of money and his songs were happily listened to by millions–especially the two that I think you know, “Addicted to Love” and “Bad Case of Loving You.”.

    “Suzi Quatro (leather tuscadero) please.”

    25 or more albums, record sales estimated at over 40 million worldwide.

    These are just bands that I like and think are every bit as deserving of acclaim as Joan Jett; there are, undoubtedly, hundreds of other bands that other people feel the same way about.

  37. 37
    democommie

    No John Mayall/Bluesbreakers, JJ Cale,John Hyatt, Atlanta Rhythm Section–the list just keeps getting longer.

  38. 38
    jakc

    Add me to the list of people that think a music hall of fame is a silly idea, The only truly objective criteria for music is overall sales, the rest is subjective. The Bay City Rollers probably sold more than the Velvet Underground, but had little lasting influence on the artists that followed, while a common quip is that everyone who bought the first VU album started a band.Add me to the list of people that think a music hall of fame is a silly idea, The only truly objective criteria for music is overall sales, the rest is subjective. The Bay City Rollers probably sold more than the Velvet Underground, but had little lasting influence on the artists that followed, while a common quip is that everyone who bought the first VU album started a band.

    Add me to the list as well. I think one problem is that rock critics for the most part descend from three guys getting stoned in a dorm room in 1964; they liked the Velvet Underground and Sgt. Pepper and so those are good. 14-year old girls liked the Bay City Rollers so the Rollers are bad.

    The odd thing is that 14-year olds probably listen to and buy more music than 50-year olds (at least they did back in the 1960′s and 70′s), but objective standards get overwhelmed by subjective standards when necessary. 14-year old girls are not cool. The Bay City Rollers are not cool. The Bay City Rollers certainly sold more albums than the Sex Pistols or the Velvet Underground but that is explained away by that vague concept called “influence”

    The Ramones were cool so they must have been influential and important and they go in, while bands like Rush, Styx, REO Speedwagon, Cheap Trick, Journey, Grand Funk Railroad and the Guess Who, from roughly the same era, are not cool and are not in – despite the fact that far more people have paid for their records, paid to see them in concert, or heard them on the radio. Laura Nyro is in but Three Dog Night and the 5th Dimension are not, even though you might have never have heard of her without those bands covering songs. Ritchie Valens is in for one great song and a tragic death with Buddy Holly; Bobby Fuller isn’t in despite a suicide and a better song. Don McLean isn’t in despite a huge song about, among other things, Buddy Holly.

    My favorite irony is that Crosby, Stills and Nash are in, but not Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young – apparently adding Neil Young, in the HOF twice (solo and with Buffalo Springfield), made the band worse not better.

    It would make more sense to enshrine songs or albums rather than bands. That wouldn’t change the fact that a small group of people with similar tastes get to make the choices, but at least we don’t have to have the fight about what version of the band gets in.

    As for Rush, never been a huge fan, but I still don’t get how Black Sabbath is in and Deep Purple is not (“Paranoid” was a great album at age 12 but is a little cringe-worthy now). Hell, I suspect people have heard more often and bought more copies of “Smoke on the Water” which mentions Frank Zappa, than all of Zappa’s songs, but Zappa is in.

  39. 39
    mikeym

    How is it that Johnny Rivers is NOT in the Hall of Fame?

  40. 40
    Olav

    Williamgeorge, #32:

    As a Canadian I’m happy that our national band may finally be inducted.

    The Tragically Hip?

  41. 41
    brucegorton

    I find ‘Rock and Roll’ a term associated with a greasy hairstyle, fixed rhythms and instruments and empty lyrics- Bill Haley, the old Beatles, that sort of thing. I can’t bring myself to call Rush or Kraftwerk Rock ‘n’ Roll

    To claim rock, as a genre, has empty lyrics kind of defines one as not having heard much rock.

  42. 42
    democommie

    Frank Zappa put out over 60 albums (at least one a year from 1967 until his death in 1993.

    His music has been covered by a number of bands, including the London Symphony.

    Zappa, like Lenny Bruce, was a foulmouthed performer. He was also a musical genius.

    Deep Purple and a number of other rock bands include excellent musicians and showman. I would not consider them to be in the same league as Zappa, and that is not meant as an insult.

    If Frank was still alive he might well have told the HoF to keep their trophy.

  43. 43
    left0ver1under

    First, the “hall of lame” needs Rush. Rush do not need it. Groucho Marx was right.

    Second, the “hall” is run by Jan Wenner and his cronies from rolling stone magazine. RS is to music what an ambulance chaser is to the legal profession. Those at the “hall” work hand in hand (read: money passes between hands) with the record companies to promote and overhype so much crap. If you want to know which groups will be “inducted” this year, go check the record companies’ websites and look for newly packaged greatest hits and boxed set compilations. Those are the groups who will get in. “Nominations” and “inductions” are deliberately timed to maximize revenues and capitalize on nostalgia, not when the group deserves recognition.

    Third, a proper music hall of fame is needed, not just “rock and roll” (which that one no longer is), and should not be run by corporate cronies or be money-driven. Induction should be based on reasonable criteria and categories (e.g. musical talent, influence, innovation, the number and quality of records, album art and artists), not when a group put out their first record and how many copies they sold. By the criteria of the “hall”, new kids on the block will be eligible soon – and probably get in.

    Fourth, why does no one respect Kraftwerk, not here and other sites talking about this? They are more influential and important to electronic music than the Beatles were to pop music. Speaking of electronic music and snubbed groups, where are Joy Division/New Order and Devo? Both have been around 30+ years.

  44. 44
    kuralssssp

    Genesis got inducted. But Yes? No? C’mon these two bands are soulmates who started the same and went on to produce very divergent albums. Sure, I’ve heard all those “professors” who tell me that King Crimson (another glaring omission) is the true prog and the rest are mere imitators. Perish the thought. Surprising that a band like Yes that could fill up Cleveland’s own Blossom Music Center as late as 2004, isn’t considered popular or famous enough. And John Mayall? No questions.

  45. 45
    democommie

    “Speaking of electronic music and snubbed groups, where are Joy Division/New Order and Devo? Both have been around 30+ years.”

    Last I heard/read, Mark Mothersbaugh of Devo was a happily busy guy (http://www.mutato.com/info/). I agree with leftoverunder that most of the bands in the HoF are there for reasons beyond my ken.

  46. 46
    Alverant

    Rush deserves to be in the RRHoF because of how it influenced the genre and other bands.

    I’m also going to come out and say Weird Al also deserves a spot, not just for his music but for his directoral skills with music videos.

  47. 47
    rgmani

    The major problem with the R&R Hall of Fame IMHO is that they have a fairly strong bias against Art/Prog Rock and Hard Rock/Heavy Metal and an inexplicable fondness for minor R&B acts of the 50s and 60s. From what I see, the above biases are at the root of most of the snubs as well as the undeserving inclusions. Things seem to be changing for the better of late with a lot more Prog and Metal acts getting in. Hopefully, in another decade the Hall of Fame might become something most rock fans can be happy with.

    – RM

  48. 48
    Michael Heath

    rgmani writes:

    The major problem with the R&R Hall of Fame IMHO is that they have a fairly strong bias against Art/Prog Rock and Hard Rock/Heavy Metal and an inexplicable fondness for minor R&B acts of the 50s and 60s.

    I agree but would add there’s a bias for bands that did well in the NYC scene but nowhere else. Some of course earned the attention, like the Talking Heads, but even the ones we all know often didn’t have the material and talent to match-up to their hype.

  49. 49
    Pieter B, FCD

    And as I say every year about this time, how can you take the Hall seriously as long as Nicky Hopkins isn’t in the sidemen category? He should have been there on the first ballot of the first year. You may not know who he was, but you know his piano if you listened to almost any classic rock band. Beatles (“Revolution” among many others), Stones (the intro to “She’s A Rainbow” puts a lump in my throat every time I hear it), the Who, Jeff Beck, the Airplane, Quicksilver Messenger Service, Kinks, Yardbirds, Joe Cocker… sometimes I think it would be easier to list the bands he didn’t play with, but then you wouldn’t have heard of most of them.

  50. 50
    Michael Heath

    Pieter B writes:

    nd as I say every year about this time, how can you take the Hall seriously as long as Nicky Hopkins isn’t in the sidemen category? He should have been there on the first ballot of the first year.

    Aye, he one of the very artists I was thinking of when I wrote the following @ 13:

    And given the Hall provides inductions to people absurdly beyond what rock and roll is or came from while leaving out so many deserving others (especially some studio musicians), it’d be great to see a competing entity challenge them. One run by people who are actual fans of rock and roll.

    Some others: Jim Keltner, Russ Kunkel, Bobby Keys (another Rolling Stones sideman), David Lindley, and Danny Kortchmar. The last two helped define the country rock sound we now all take for granted.

    I also think Pete Anderson, Dwight Yoakum’s guitar player, deserves to be in the Hall as a stand-alone, as does Tom Petty and the Heartbreaker’s lead guitarist, Mike Campbell, for the very same reason. Neither Yoakum or Petty would have gotten to where they did without Anderson and Campbell respectively.

  51. 51
    bryanfeir

    I love Rush, but Tull is utterly seminal.

    Of course, Tull has the whole ‘which former members to include’ problem in spades…

    An old roommate of mine had the ’20 Years of Jethro Tull’ CD, and the centerfold of the album booklet had a genealogy of the band, including all members from 1967 to 1987 (and there have been others since, of course), and all the other bands that those people had been members of, both before and after. Holy crap was that a long list…

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jethro_Tull_%28band%29#Member_history

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